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Comment Re:Sanity checks (Score 1) 212

Depends on the business case for one or the other. In this case, the bank may well have decided 'the less than, literally, 600-in-7.5-billion chance of having somebody exceed this age range is less important to us than stopping incorrect payments going out to people with ages that are far FAR beyond 'wildly improbable.''

In other cases, it would be far better to have multiple incorrect accounts than to miss one valid but wildly outlier account.

Comment Re:So what's the issue? (Score 1) 212

What if you think 'Out of 7.5 billion humans, there are, at most, 600 people over the age of 110. How many of the 0.00000799927238618 percent of humans who fit this category likely happen to live in our country? How much bigger is the number of incorrect or fraudulent records where the age is above, say, 110?'

Comment Re: So what's the issue? (Score 2) 212

Why would someone who is not a programmer set up such an arbitrary limit?

Probably because it's not arbitrary; most people don't live to be 110, and everybody knows you're supposed to perform sanity checking. According to a quick google search (the height of scholarly rigor,) there's maybe 300 people in the world who are older than 110 years. The most wild estimate is 600.

On the other hand, fraud is a real thing, not to mention straight up human error; somebody dies, they don't get taken out of the system, so the money keeps going out.

Comment Re:Not easy to fix - cheaper solution (Score 1) 212

I doubt very highly it's a 'two digit year' storage issue.

More likely, it's perfectly correct and reasonable boundary checking; an age should never be less than 0, and never more than, what? How many people are actually older than 110? She is an extreme outlier, and proof positive that the boundary checking is working.

Comment Re:Storage? (Score 2) 475

For coal, this doesn't really matter - it still loses. To pick up where renewables leave off, you want natural gas (or even petroleum) turbines that can quickly be brought on and off line. Coal and nuclear are not really suited to this.

The power industry makes the distinction between "base load" and "peak load" generation sources. Coal and nuclear are best for base load, running 100% capacity as much as possible. Combined-cycle turbines are best for peak load since they can be economically throttled.

The issue is both peak and base load demands are increasing. Turbines make great peak load sources but are poor for base load. TVA -- my former employer -- took coal plants offline due to Obama-era regulations making them impossible or unprofitable to operate (or both). They made up for the lost generating capacity by running their turbines as if they were base load generators. The result? Huge increases in turbine maintenance costs, more frequent maintenance outages, and more unplanned outages.

If the goal is to kill coal you have to replace it with something. Nuclear is a non-starter for most people because of their hysterical, irrational fear of it. Natural gas is cheap but, as stated above, it's not the best candidate for peak load generation. Nothing in the solar or wind column can come close to substituting for any current base load generation technology.

Comment Re:Total regulatory impact 2-3 percent (Score 2) 475

Coal has been made disproportionately more expensive over the last several years by government fiat, not market forces. Burdensome regulation and carbon taxes have made it so. Until recently I worked for TVA (mostly nuclear plants but some coal, hydro, and combined-cycle turbines). Several coal plants were shut down well ahead of schedule simply because Obama-era regulations made them unprofitable to run. Remember, candidate-Obama promised to destroy coal. He certainly worked hard enough at it.

If coal is allowed to float without government interference it will be quite a bit cheaper than renewables and much more abundant. Windmills only spin when the wind is blowing. Solar only works when the sun is out and your panels aren't covered in snow. Coal runs 24x7, rain or shine, windy or calm, hot or cold.

Comment Re:Total regulatory impact 2-3 percent (Score 1) 475

Adapt. Fossil fuels are over. They're too expensive.

Says the guy whose lights and computer are very likely lit by electricity generated from fossil fuels. Who, if he has a car, is likely powered by fossil fuels or has a battery charged by fossil fuels. Or, if he uses mass transit, it's either fueled by fossil fuels or powered by electricity derived from fossil fuels. Whose synthetic plastic materials around him are made from fossil fuels. Who, if he's ever flown anywhere, was in a plane powered by fossil fuels. Who, if he stopped to consider it, would be utterly unable to function today in any useful capacity without power, products, or motive force made possible in whole or in part by fossil fuels.

But hey doesn't it sound all trendy and shit to say "fossil fuels are over"?

Comment Coal won't cut it? (Score 2, Informative) 475

From the DoE:

Major energy sources and percent shares of U.S. electricity generation at utility-scale facilities in 2016:

Natural gas = 33.8%
Coal = 30.4%
Nuclear = 19.7%
Renewables (total) = 14.9%
Hydropower = 6.5%
Wind = 5.6%
Biomass = 1.5%
Solar = 0.9%
Geothermal = 0.4%
Petroleum = 0.6%
Other gases = 0.3%
Other nonrenewable sources = 0.3%
Pumped storage hydroelectricity = -0.2%

So, wind + solar = 6.5%
Coal + natural gas + nuclear = 83.9%

Winner = not renewables

If coal's been on the decline it's only because the Obama administration demonized it and because we had a happy accident of finding an abundance of natural gas. Wind and solar would be nowhere without massive government subsidies.

Meanwhile, I'm still waiting on those fusion reactors.

Comment Re:Defining sports (Score 1) 269

Ok, so it's like the SCOTUS and pornography; you'll know it when you see it.

So, the followup question would be: you have teams of competitive StarCraft players who train in amounts and methods very similar to atheletes, and who play for cash prizes, sponsorship deals, and what not; what term would you say applies?

Comment Turing (Score 1) 629

My first 'formal' computer programming training was in High School, using a language developed at the University of Toronto called Turing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

It was a cute little language, and I remember doing some fun stuff in it, including some basic 3d wireframe engine work. Which was pretty exciting stuff in high school computer programming in the early 90s on a 386.

Comment Re:American problem is American (Score 1) 440

You know people might need to get more than two loads of laundry done in a day. While one might not need to supervise the washing machine, you do need to be around to move the laundry to the dryer, so that you know, it drys. Where with a normal washer I could have the wash done in thirty minutes, throw it in the dryer, start ANOTHER load in the washer and then run into town to get some errands done, when I get home an hour later, oh looks. I have a load of dry laundry., and another load of laundry to put in the dryer. Meanwhile you are still waiting for your first load of laundry to wash and I'm getting load number three in the washer.

You'd be amazed at how much laundry two kids and two adults can produce in a week.

Given that I had laundry duty for the wife and three daughters, I know exactly how much laundry can be produced in a week. I also know that it's not unusual for the laundry to sit in the washing machine for three hours after it's run before I get around to moving it to the dryer.

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