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Submission + - SpaceX makes aerospace history with successful launch/landing of a used rocket (theverge.com)

Eloking writes: After more than two years of landing its rockets after launch, SpaceX finally sent one of its used Falcon 9s back into space. The rocket took off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, this evening, sending a communications satellite into orbit, and then landed on one of SpaceX’s drone ships floating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was round two for this particular rocket, which already launched and landed during a mission in April of last year. But the Falcon 9’s relaunch marks the first time an orbital rocket has launched to space for a second time.

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk appeared on the company’s live stream shortly after the landing and spoke about the accomplishment. “It means you can fly and refly an orbital class booster, which is the most expensive part of the rocket. This is going to be, ultimately, a huge revolution in spaceflight,” he said.

Comment Some are, some aren't (Score 2) 537

In this respect, techies are like anybody else. Some are out to help save the world, or at least make it a better place, and some aren't. It's not the tech that makes the savior, it's the person.

The same can be said about:

- finance folks (microcredit vs subprime mortgages)
- engineers (postwar reconstruction vs weapons)
- architects (affordable housing designs vs Trump towers)
- builders (habitat for humanity vs suburban subdivisions)

to name a few examples.

Comment Re:with so much demand for lego... (Score 1) 165

Good luck with that. The precision of Lego's molding process is beyond what can be done at home.

https://www.quora.com/Is-it-po...

Quote:

The moulds are permitted a tolerance of up to two micrometres...

To put that two micrometers tolerance into perspective:
- 1–10 m — diameter of a typical bacterium.
- 3–4 m — size of a typical yeast cell.

Comment Re:Legendary... (Score 5, Informative) 232

"Michael Abrash is a game programmer and technical writer specializing in optimization and 80x86 assembly language, game programming, a reputation cemented by his 1990 book Zen of Assembly Language Volume 1: Knowledge. Related issues were covered in his later book Zen of Graphics Programming. [...] After working at Microsoft on graphics and assembly code for Windows NT 3.1, he returned to the game industry in the mid-1990s to work on Quake for id Software. "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M...

Comment Re: why? (Score 1) 192

This would be hugely useful for remotely deployed ship-based (operating near shore) sensors which use cell networks to send back readings. For security and environmental reasons, the sensors are sealed boxes with no physical access to what's inside, including the SIM. What happens if the device is moved to another carrier's coverage area, or another country? What happens if the current carrier goes under, or they jack up their rates, or change their roaming policies? Right now, a carrier going under would brick the device.

Additionally, think beyond phones, as TFA implies. Physical access to a SIM is a security risk in itself. I would rather restrict phyical access to the SIM, and have password restricted access to a reprogrammable SIM than have my sensor drop off the air, or start sending readings somewhere else altogether.

Comment Re:Can we get a kiosk? (Score 1) 137

Why should I make the individual investment when I can just go to Menards with an AutoCAD or Unigraphics file and say, "print me a plastic part" for $2.99 and I'll stop by when its done?

Few people thought they needed home laser printers at first either. And you can bet that there will be a Kinko's model coming around the bend quite quickly.

The Almighty Buck

Device Protects Day Traders From Emotional Trading 260

Philips Electronics, a Netherlands-based company, has come up with a device designed to protect day traders from emotionally based trading decisions. The Rationalizer measures your galvanic skin response and lets you know when you are under stress. An online trader can then take a "time-out, wind down and re-consider their actions," according to the company. This may have come too late for us, but at least future generations won't have to live through the horror of angry day trading.
The Courts

Submission + - SCO blames Linux for bankruptcy filing 4

Stony Stevenson writes: SCO Group CEO Darl McBride says competition from the open source Linux operating system was a major reason why the company was forced to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Friday.

In a court filing in support of SCO's bankruptcy petition, McBride noted that SCO's sales of Unix-based products "have been declining over the past several years." The slump, McBride said, "has been primarily attributable to significant competition from alternative operating systems, including Linux."

McBride listed IBM, Red Hat, Microsoft, and Sun Microsystems as distributors of Linux or other software that is "aggressively taking market share away from Unix."
Windows

Submission + - The Greatest Game You Never Played

Alan writes: FiringSquad has been running their "American Idol wannabe" contest for a little over a month now. Now that they've weeded out the dredge, there are actually some awesome entries now. One of the best from this round is an article on The Greatest Game You've Never Played: Allegiance R3 Release. Apparently, it's a game Microsoft released several years ago and *gasp* ultimately made open source. It's since been developed further into an incredibly user-centric game. Good read.

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