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Comment Problem (Score 1) 207

He doesn't understand the limitations of technology. Unless quantum computing becomes mainstream, it's unlikely we'll have the processing power necessary to realize anything that we would recognize as AI (say, passing an unseeded Turing test with an arbitrary respondent).

It's been 35 years that I have been watching this and nothing better than an optimized Eliza has been demonstrated.

Comment Re:Google is evidence that the internet failed (Score 1) 105

You aren't tracking why it caught on. I obviously have more familiarity with the situation in the mid-1990s than you do. There were ample commercial alternatives to the internet which died on the vine precisely on the issue of corporate control and cost. If the government had attempted to closely control the network post-1994, none of this would have happened.

Comment Google is evidence that the internet failed (Score 3, Interesting) 105

The whole goddamned point was an online network not controlled by a big telco or the government. And here we are - controlled by monopolistic entities and/or governments. I'm so relieved it isn't a big national telecom monopoly (not).

Through the combined efforts of criminal activity, rogue states and a failure to just fragment the network, large monopolistic entities now control communications in a way they hadn't since the advent of public internet access. You can't run your own servers, at least if you don't want to play whack-a-mole with constant threats, paramount being the DDoS that you have no power to resist yourself. The common protocols have been one by one exposed to be insecure. The price of sufficent infrastructure to provide an emulation of those protocols has risen to the point that individuals can't afford it. If you still are, you just haven't been attacked vigorously enough yet, or you're already compromised and don't know it.

The problem is the money. None of this would be happening if it weren't possible to steal money or commit fraud over the network.

Disconnecting entirely sounds better and better every day. It's just going to get worse.

Comment Re: Having a 'bad gene'... (Score 1) 579

This. It's not that (or not only that, at least) more people are dying of cancer, or even of specific cancers in this day and age; it's a combination of things like 'instead of having ten people dying of 'consumption' or 'old age' we now break it out into specific cancers' and 'well, a hundred years ago, they usually died of something else, first.'

And yeah, until very recently, kids were 'shy' or 'withdrawn' and would have undesirable traits beaten out of them; metaphorically or literally.

Comment Re:What is the point of view? (Score 3, Informative) 579

Well, think of it this way.

A housing development has a rash (pun intended) of break-ins.

They get together and decide to institute mandatory installation of alarm systems.

The number of break-ins goes down in direct proportion to the number of houses have alarm systems installed, until all the houses have them installed, and the number of break-ins is almost, but not quite, zero per year.

After a while, people start to think 'we don't have a break-in problem, why are we mandating these alarm systems?'

New houses under construction start to be built without alarm systems. What do you suppose happens to the break-in rate?

The price of freedom (from preventable disease) is eternal vigilance (of vaccination rates.)

It's real easy to say 'we don't need vaccines' when you've never seen a playmate in polio braces, or when pictures of a wall full of children in iron lungs is a quaint historical anachronism. When you don't have an Uncle Bob who's sterile from a bout of mumps. When having a dead sibling is unusual, and probably the result of accident or something, and not 'measles.'

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