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Comment When you let Goblins write the rules ... (Score 4, Interesting) 635

Albus Dumbledore explains to Harry Potter the philosophy of Goblins and the concept of selling an object.

From the Goblin POV, the only true master of any object is the person who made it. They do not like the habit of witches and wizards acquiring goblin made objects and passing them from wizard to wizard by sale or by inheritance. What wizard think as the price paid to a Goblin own an object, is merely a license fee to use the object for the lifetime of the purchaser. When the wizard dies, or no longer wants to own it, the object should be returned to the Goblin who made it.

John Deere will agree with this philosophy wholeheartedly.

Comment Re:How much to do this legally? (Score 1) 35

(For the record, I'm not involved in that type of business, but I do know some things about the evolution of modern payment systems, so I'm speaking from that angle, not as someone interested in dirty talk with an anonymous liar. Really.)

Wow! Even anonymous cowards do not want to be mistaken for phone sex callers...

Comment Re:So it begins... (Score 1) 212

A good question: What is it about paying rent people find so appealing?

Some opt to pay rent knowingly and willingly. If your job does not have steady predictable minimum income stream, you would be wise to rent a home/apartment, rather than owning. If you want to keep the option of taking a job anywhere in the country, again you would knowingly pay rent, rather than own.

Others are forced to rent knowingly and unwillingly. Usually poorer people without good credit history, they don't qualify for loans or have enough to invest. One of the startling findings about expanding solar to sub-Saharan Africa was this: They were paying lots of money for batteries, battery lamps and lighting oils but were too poor to acquire solar panels for themselves. A rack of 10 solar panels is too expensive for anyone in that village to own. The micro lending organizations stepped in and created loans for someone to buy a 10 or 20 solar panels and let people charge their phones and flash lights and lanterns for a fee. It is a very successful program. Rate of return is too small for big banks to even look at it. But some social welfare organizations solicit donations to lend money to poor villagers to buy solar panels and cell phones as micro or nano business opportunity. This is another example of people paying rent, knowing the economics but resigned to fate.

Then comes the third category that made you ask that rhetorical question. Some people are tricked into paying rents.

Comment Re:Many things are worse than bad comment punctuat (Score 1) 523

Thanks for the follow up. I agree with you on using long descriptive function names and variable names to reduce the need for comments.

Differences in our backgrounds explain the different emphasis we are placing on comments. But all three of us agree more than we disagree. Splitting hairs about the last 5% disagreement, while ignoring 95% agreement.

Comment Wonder how easy IRS would be on me if ... (Score 2) 135

If I have a software glich in my brain and enter made up data in my tax return, for 15 years, will IRS be as easy on me as SEC has been to Citi?

The banksters are simply too big to jail and too big to even question. Break up the banks.

"Honey I shrunk the government. And the banksters drowned it in the bathtub!"

Comment Re:Many things are worse than bad comment punctuat (Score 1) 523

I agree with Kosh, not with swillden.

The most important comments are the ones that specify "why not". Often we will implement the interface using some methods, after release we find the inadequacies and change the implementation. Often the first implementation would be simple, intuitive and the first thing anyone would think of. Now that implementation is gone, and new less obvious and often tricky things are introduced. If the "why this and not that" comment is missing, a later code review might remove the complex second implementation and restore status quo ante.

It is important to document why it is not done that way, what we intend to do. Without it we will be forced to constantly reverse engineer to understand the code and might repeatedly re learn the same lessons over and over again.

Comment Many things are worse than bad comment punctuation (Score 4, Interesting) 523

Worst comments are obsolete comments. The comment described what that function was designed to do, some 8 years ago. It has morphed since, default arguments added, the list has been replaced by multimap which was replaced by hashmap completely changing the behavior, and still the comments have not been updated.

Next worst are ego comments. Every inline function preceded by three line comment naming the author as though he is Leo Tolstoy or she is Jane Austen.

Next worst are trivial comments. Next worst are no comments.

Then comes badly formatted comments.

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