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Comment Re: Why doesn't law enforcement get it? (Score 2) 145

What we really need are for the tech companies to band together like the libraries did, and protect the confidentiality of their clients. Demand warrants, and stop allowing easy access to our records. If the books I borrow are privileged information that requires a lawful warrant or subpoena (by law in most states), then so are the websites I visit, and the email I send and receive.

Comment Re:Don't Be Evil (Score 0, Flamebait) 432

That happened after 3rd party repairs and/or modifications though. It was more like an xbox detecting that the dvd drive had been swapped, and triggering the DRM. This case though, is more like when Sony removed the Linux capability from the Playstation 3. Hell, think of the outrage that would take place if a car manufacturer decided they were no longer going to repair a line of vehicles sold, and were even going around to the owners homes to inject a solution to cause the engines to seize.

Comment Defense calls surprise expert witness for rebuttal (Score 3, Insightful) 171

Hello, Maryland AG's Mother, and thank you for appearing in front of us today as an expert Mother. Your son has argued that everyone knows cell phones create, store, and broadcast location data all the time so no warrant is needed for tracking them. Did you know that your phone is reporting your location to the phone company 24 hours a day? Did you know your son wants to know where you go every hour of the day, and believes he has the right to do so without a warrant?

Comment Cars can now be copyrighted? (Score 2) 138

How is this reconciled with automakers not being allowed to pursue copyright claims against makers/sellers/distributors of replicas and kit-cars? I thought previous court cases determined that vehicles could not be copyrighted, and automakers only enjoyed trademark protection against the specific logos and trademarks placed on the vehicles?

Comment Re: Quick poll (Score 1) 174

Name one. I've searched CyanogenMod's supported devices page, and the earliest CM12 compatible device is from early 2012. Everything else is CM11 or earlier. MIUI v7 is similarly limited to devices from early 2012, AOKP hasn't yet released a stable Lollipop build for any device, and Paranoid only goes as far back as late 2012 / early 2013.
Near as I can tell, no Lollipop Rom supports anything from before 2012, mostly because the device manufacturers are still using proprietary blobs that require specific versions of the linux kernel to compile against, limiting how much support can actually be provided by newer versions of Android. There's also the fact of CPU/GPU/RAM limitations to take into account on older devices, and whether the experience of a Lollipop build for an older device becomes so terrible that it causes harm to the brand as a whole. Apple ran into that during their previous OS update to iOS 8, with the oldest compatible devices becoming noticeably slower after the upgrade.

Comment Re:Very sad - but let's get legislation in place N (Score 1) 706

Actually, the law is almost always on the storage facility's side. In general, the facility is not responsible for your items, assuming reasonable precautions are taken. You should carry your own insurance (through the facility or outside insurance), because the facility's own insurance may only be liable for the buildings themselves.
As has been pointed out to me though, there apparently was little to no security for the Ashley-Madison breach, which is much like a storage facility with no fence, no secured access, and no provision for you to even attach your own lock to the door of your unit. I don't think any judge would absolve such a facility of responsibility for such a lack of security like they would for one that took reasonable precautions against theft.

Comment Re:Very sad - but let's get legislation in place N (Score 1) 706

So, if this wasn't a theft of PII by network hack, but instead a physical break-in/raid resulting in the loss of all paper files, should all the executives still be on the hook? Say, if Ashley-Madison operated before the internet age, where customers visited an actual brick and mortor location and filled out paper forms, rather than electronic. Should a physical store be required to be Fort Knox before executives can be considered blameless for a breach?

Comment Re:Oh boy (Score 3, Insightful) 253

You shouldn't ever need the secret ones. Software taking advantage of the secret internal API's are the whole reason why upgrading Windows can and does break software. Heck, it's the reason so many malware programs cause actual bluescreens after an update. I sometimes wish they had never been accessible to 3rd parties.

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