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Submission + - Is This Year's Dicamba Drift Problem Getting Understated In The News

MrBingoBoingo writes: Since Monsanto released their new generation of Dicamba resistant soybeans to farmers earlier this year, reports have been emerging of the volatile herbicide causing substantial collateral damage as it vaporizes and drifts. Recently the damage this drift has done to orchards and stands of trees has been acknowledged. With all the fuss that gets raised about GMOs in general, why is an actual agricultural disaster getting so little substantive coverage as it unfolds?

Submission + - Soros, the Open Society Foundations, and the Continued Political Hacks (riskbasedsecurity.com)

jkouns writes: A website called DC Leaks published internal data about the Open Society Foundations, an organization run by George Soros. The bulk of the data, which totals 1.51GB and is spread across 2,576 files. The DC Leaks website allows visitors to view the data and even offers a search function that has indexed the Soros leak to some extent. In the Soros leak there are interesting mentions about drones over 15 documents. The documents appear to show some of the intentions and contributing ideas made by the Open Society Foundations into accountability surrounding drone use by the United States military.

Submission + - PGP Short-ID Collision Attacks Continued, Now Targeted Linus Torvalds

An anonymous reader writes: Enrico Zini wrote:

There are currently at least 3 ways to refer to a GPG key: short key ID (last 8 hex digits of fingerprint), long key ID (last 16 hex digits) and full fingerprint. The short key ID used to be popular, and since 5 years it is known that it is computationally easy to generate a GnuPG key with an arbitrary short key id.

LWN.net wrote in June 3, 2016:

Gunnar Wolf urges developers to stop using "short" PGP key IDs as soon as possible. The impetus for the advice originates with Debian's Enrico Zini, who recently found two keys sharing the same short ID in the wild.

After contacted the owner, it turned out that one of the keys is a fake. In addition, labelled same names, emails, and even signatures created by more fake keys. Weeks later, more developers found their fake "mirror" keys on the keyserver, including the PGP Global Directory Verification Key. Gunnar Wolf wrote:

We don't know who is behind this, or what his purpose is. We just know this looks very evil.

Now, a fake key (fake: 0x6211aa3b00411886, real: 0x79be3e4300411886) of Linus Torvalds was found in the wild, scroll the page and you'll two of them. It looked like that every single key from the Linux kernel community have been forged successfully, another example is Greg Kroah-Hartman (fake:0x27365dea6092693e, real: 0x38dbbdc86092693e). LWN reader "rmayr" commented:

so it seems somebody is actually constructing a database of fake keypairs with "well-known" short IDs. Something is going on here...

Submission + - Genetically modified mosquitoes released in Cayman Islands (wral.com)

Okian Warrior writes: The first wave of genetically modified mosquitoes were released Wednesday in the Cayman Islands as part of a new effort to control the insect that spreads Zika and other viruses, officials in the British Island territory said.

Genetically altered male mosquitoes, which don't bite but are expected to mate with females to produce offspring that die before reaching adulthood, were released in the West Bay area of Grand Cayman Island, according to a joint statement from the Cayman Islands Mosquito Research and Control Unit and British biotech firm Oxitec.

[Note from submitter: This November Florida will hold a referendum to decide whether to release genetically modified mosquitos to combat Zika]

[Also, here's some background on the process.]

Submission + - Millennials Are Less Likely To Be Having Sex Than Young Adults 30 Years Ago (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A survey of nearly 27,000 people suggests that millennials are less likely to be having sex than younger adults were 30 years ago. The Guardian reports: "The research, conducted in the U.S., found that the percentage of young adults aged between 20 and 24 who reported having no sexual partner after the age of 18 increased from 6% among those born in the 1960s, to 15% of young adults born in the 1990s. Published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior by researchers from three U.S. universities, the study involved the analysis of data collected through the nationwide General Social Survey that has asked U.S. adults about their sexual behavior almost every year since 1989. The results reveal that young adults aged between 20 and 24 and born in the 1990s were more than twice as likely to report that they had had no sexual partners since the age of 18 than young adults of the same age born in the 1960s. Just over 15% of the 90s-born group reported that they had not had sex since they turned 18, compared to almost 12% of those born in the 1970s or 1980s. For those born in the 60s the figure was just over 6%. The shift [towards increasing abstinence seen among all adults since the 1960s] was greater for white individuals, those who had not gone to university, and those who attended religious services. The trend was also greater for women than for men: the authors found that 2.3% of women born in the 1960s are sexually inactive, compared to 5.4% of those born in the 1990s. That, the authors suggest, could in part be down to a rise in so-called virginity pledges as well as concerns about social stigma.

Submission + - Bitcoin Exchange Says It Was Hacked, Trading Suspended (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Hong Kong-based digital currency exchange Bitfinex said late on Tuesday it has suspended trading on its exchange after it discovered a security breach, according to a company statement on its website. The company said it has also suspended deposits and withdrawals of digital currencies from the exchange. "We are investigating the breach to determine what happened, but we know that some of our users have had their bitcoins stolen," the company said. "We are undertaking a review to determine which users have been affected by the breach. While we conduct this initial investigation and secure our environment, bitfinex.com will be taken down and the maintenance page will be left up." The company said it has reported the theft to law enforcement. It said it has not yet determined the value of digital currencies stolen from customer accounts.

Submission + - Seymour Papert, creator of the Logo language, died aged 88

gwolf writes: The great educator, creator of the Logo programming language, and the enabler for computer education in the 1980s has passed away. Listing his contributions is impossible in an article summary, but the ACM has published a short in-memoriam note for him.
Papert is, without exaggeration, one of the people I owe my career and life choices to.

Submission + - PGP Key of President of the Muslim Association of Puget Sound Trivially Factored

An anonymous reader writes: One of seven keys recently found to be trivially factorable by the Phuctor belongs to Mahmood Khadeer, President of the Muslim Association of Puget Sound. Khadeer's key and the others appear to have been generated with PGP software that utilized a null random number generator based on the way they were factored.

Submission + - Judge Rules FBI Violated Fourth Amendment By Recording 200+ Hours of Audio (thenextweb.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A federal judge in the Bay Area ruled that the FBI violated the fourth amendment by recording more than 200 hours of conversation at the entrance to a court house. Agents planted concealed microphones around the San Mateo County Courthouse in 2009 and 2010 as part of an investigation into bid-rigging at public auctions for foreclosed homes. In November, lawyers representing five defendants filed a motion that the recordings were unconstitutional on fourth amendment grounds (illegal search and seizure). US District Judge Charles Breyer wrote in an order yesterday: [T]he government utterly failed to justify a warrantless electronic surveillance that recorded private conversations spoken in hushed tones by judges, attorneys, and court staff entering and exiting a courthouse. Even putting aside the sensitive nature of the location here, Defendants have established that they believed their conversations were private and they took reasonable steps to thwart eavesdroppers.

Submission + - Japan Starts 8K TV Broadcasts In Time For Rio Olympics (pcworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Japan began the world's first regular 8K television broadcasts on Monday, five days ahead of the opening of the Olympic Games. 8K refers to broadcasts with a resolution of 7,680 x 4,320 pixels. That's 16 times the resolution of today's full high-definition (FHD) broadcasts and four times that of the 4K standard, which is only just emerging in many other countries. The format used by NHK, which it calls "Super Hi-Vision," also features 22.2-channel surround sound. Public broadcaster NHK launched a satellite channel that will broadcast a mix of 8K and 4K content as it prepares to launch full-scale 8K transmissions in time for the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. The channel will be on air daily from 10am until 5pm, with extended hours during the Rio Olympics. Japan's early lead in 8K broadcasting is thanks to NHK and its Science and Technology Research Laboratories in Tokyo.

Submission + - Your exotic pet is actually a bioweapon (thebulletin.org)

Lasrick writes: Laura Kahn at Princeton's Program on Science and Global Security writes about how security experts, including some in the US military, are becoming concerned about the potential for adversaries to deliberately introduce non-native species as biological weapons. But, as Kahn points out: 'The United States already endures biological attacks from non-native species every year, which arrive in large numbers via the exotic pet trade.'

Kahn goes on to look at both the legal and illegal wildlife trade in the US, and efforts to curb wildlife trafficking. Great read.

Submission + - Reddit will censor you if you complain online about tmobile policies. (reddit.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: I got into a long winded battle after T-mobile charged me full service costs after they suspended my mobile service on my tablet. I complained on the forums and got into a long winded battle involving a tirade of insults. After the original post was automatically removed after 5 complaints, I resubmitted a entirely new thread only to find it only appears on my personal reddit account and not on the r/tmobile reddit forum.

Submission + - A Third Of Cash Is Held By 5 US Tech Companies (siliconbeat.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Moody's Investors Service released an analysis Friday that shows Apple, Microsoft, Alphabet, Cisco Systems, and Oracle are sitting on $504 billion, which is roughly 30% of the $1.7 trillion in cash and cash equivalents held by U.S. non-financial companies in 2015. Almost all of their earnings ($1.2 trillion) are stashed overseas in an effort to avoid paying taxes on moving profits back to the U.S. under the country's complex tax code. Apple has more than 90 percent of its money located outside of the U.S., according to its most recent filings. Moody's said in its report that "we expect that overseas cash balances will continue to grow unless tax laws are changed to encourage companies to repatriate money." Some of the other tech and Silicon Valley companies in the top 50 include Intel, Gilead Sciences, Facebook, Amazon, Qualcomm, eBay, Hewlett-Packard and Yahoo.

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