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Comment Re:Would it be positive for your customers? (Score 4, Informative) 158

Yes, more sponsored free data transfer and optimization from content providers. It's a grey area now. But "Stream Game of Thrones now without using your data, exclusively on AT&T" is something that carriers and content providers really want to do.

Comment Re:Ever the optimist is our Elon (Score 0) 426

90% of the work we're doing now (and probably closer to 100% of slashdotters' work) doesn't *need* to be done, but we do it anyway.

That's because the alternative is to just give them the things they need to live, which bothers a lot of people who like to take the position that the only moral way to survive is to work.

It has nothing to do with Maslow. If people's time wasn't taken up with bullshit jobs, and they instead were able to do work they found personally fulfilling without having to worry about working to survive, then their esteem and self-actualisation would be taken care of.

Comment Outsourcing (Score 1) 587

Outsourcing is a non-trivial affair. There are just about as many failures as successes.

Accepted economic theory is that capital is fungible, however, labor is not yet. That's the bottom line. Despite it's flaws, the Western way of doing business is superior to what happens in most of the world. Anyone who has worked with China, for example, can usually back that up.

Comment Uhh (Score 2, Interesting) 121

In 2012, an enterprising young Gizmodo blogger published the story of Shiva Ayyadurai, an MIT lecturer and renowned liar who pretends he invented email. Today, he adds another achievement to the resume, marrying Fran Drescher. Fran, you fucked up!

Yeah, I mean, Gawker probably would have lost this if they had taken it to trial. These are falsifiable claims, and interferring or attempting to in this way in a persons personal life would likely result in a good demonstration of "actual malice".

I mean, if it's just business, you do that. But this is digging into a persons personal life. That's not something you want a jury to weigh against the balancing act of "actual malice". As we saw in the main Hogan trial, it's not something you want to gamble with.

Comment I'd like to see this rule challenged (Score 1) 95

I would love to see this FTC rule challenged in Court. This is a very solid example of government overreach into private speech that they have labelled "commercial" by regulatory fiat. The entire concept of regulating this type of elective speech - where private individuals have elected to use a service which enables them to access what other people have published - is gravely disturbing to me. The FTC's view that this is a form of advertising under their control is very-outdated.

A Twitter post is much more like the answer you get when you say to a person - "What do you think?" than a form of advertising that targets people broadly.

Comment Re:linux etc (Score 2) 585

Liberalism ("Progressivism") is precisely what has led to the creation of the US prison state and fomented the spread of fascism in the US. I've personally watched it happening in real-time over the last 5+ decades.

Fuck that's funny. Even more so if you actually believe it.

There hasn't been a progressive Government in the USA for the better part of half a century, and 30-40 years for most of the rest of the western world (a handful of European countries aside, and even they've shifted significantly rightwards).

Right-wing Fascism evolved into right-wing Neoliberalism and it has been running the world since - at the absolute latest - the '80s. So the modern world shouldn't surprise anyone - the political right is the side of royalty, corporations, the church, the military, and other similar hereditary, conformist, strictly hierarchical, stratified, undemocratic organisations.

Comment Re:sigh (Score 1) 225

There was public access to the internet starting in 1989. Gopher was created in 1991. Mosaic released in 1993. So people did have access in the time of gopher and before the web "launched". I was playing muds in 91 at the library, but there were several isp's available at the time growing out of the bbs era.

Comment Re:sigh (Score 1) 225

I'd also disagree with the statement that ordinary people flocked to discover this new thing. At the time of gopher, before the web, ordinary people didn't have any interest in the internet. While some of use were listing to radio over the thing, chatting in chat rooms and using newsgroups, most of the rest of the world was oblivious to the internet. It wasn't until 93 when the web was launched the ordinary people started to join the internet and it became eternal September. I don't remember when AOL started giving away their discs, but that was a major push to get people online as well.

Comment Security (Score 1) 46

It does appear to be a bit more secure than what they had in the past, but since without text service it will lock out some people from using the service. With their password protocols requiring a new password every 6 months and requiring alpha-numeric and special key combinations it virtually guarantees that the password will have to be written down, so I guess by using this text requirement makes a bit of sense compared to just letting anyone in that happens across your password. I'm wondering though how will you be able to change numbers if you get a new phone.

Comment Re:Reliability (Score 1) 209

You can't (easily and reliably) stretch a RAID across hosts.

Backblaze take a chunk of data and break it up into 20 smaller chunks (17 data + 3 parity) and then spread those 20 chunks across 20 different physical servers. You can't do that with RAID.

It would also reduce the overall load during disk rebuilds as well.

https://www.google.com.au/sear...

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