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Comment No. (Score 3, Funny) 286

I started programming in C++ in '89. Templates were still new, but most of the language was stable. C++ code I wrote in '89 is still readable and compilable today. I know people who started with C++ in 1981, when it was still Bjarne's skunkworks project. The first public release was '83, making C++ 33 years old -- closer to 40 years old than 25.

Comment Re:7.62x63mm (Score 1) 93

(I'm the AC who originally posted; I wasn't logged in then.)

But it's nice to know they somewhat cater for the Liberians, the USAmericans and the rest of the world.

Oddly enough, a .30-06 is only called 7.62x63mm. That's the metricified name for it... but not the actual dimensions of the round: the bullet diameter is 7.8mm, not 7.62mm.

Cartridge names look like they're dimensional quantities, but they're not, and really never have been. The .38 Special and the .357 Magnum fire the same size of bullet. (In fact, you can fire .38 Special from .357 Magnum revolvers.) The German-designed 7.65mm Parabellum cartridge actually fires bullets 7.85mm in size. The Russian 9mm Makarov is actually 9.2mm. The 9mm Parabellum and 9mm Short fire different sizes of bullets, too; one is true 9mm and the other is smidge larger.

Moral of the story: the name is just a name -- it doesn't actually reflect the size of the cartridge, and for that reason there's no reason to prefer metricified names.

Comment Re: plugin has been suppressed from the wordpress (Score 2) 76

Actually, as soon as we were notified of the issue, the plugin was closed and hidden on a temporary basis until we had time to evaluate the problem. Once we had done so, I personally created a new version of the plugin, without the malicious code, and pushed it to the repository in order to get the update out to the affected users. The existing committers were all removed, leaving the plugin entirely in the hands of the plugin team. The latest version is now safe and will not be otherwise until we determine the full details of what happened here.

Full disclosure is great, but some advance notice longer than a day or so helps a lot. We will always protect our users to the best of our ability, but sometimes, we get blind sided. It happens. Nobody posts about the dozens of other times we fix things before they get exploited. Not judging, just saying.

Comment Re:Fuck Forbes, and in particular Ethan Siegel (Score 1) 176

It's clickbait and self-promotion.

Clickbait, no: there's actual, real, high-quality content to what he writes.

Self-promotion: so what? If someone writes something interesting and informative, I want it to be brought to my attention -- even if they're the ones to bring it to my attention.

Feed Techdirt: Guy Who Won Original Right To Be Forgotten Case Loses His Attempt To Have New Story About His Past Forgotten (google.com)

The whole right to be forgotten thing over in Europe continues to get more and more bizarre. Not too long ago, we wrote about one Thomas Goolnik, who had succeeded in getting an old NY Times story about him "delinked" from his name in Europe. The NY Times then wrote about that delinking, and we wrote about the NY Times article. Mr. Goolnik then succeeded in having our article about his successful right to be forgotten attempt also forgotten by Google. So we wrote about that too. And, once again, Goolnik succeeded in having that story forgotten. As of yet, it appears our final story on Goolnik has remained accessible on European searches for Goolnik's name, but we have no idea if it's because Google has realized that it should remain up or if Goolnik just hasn't made a request.

Meanwhile, it appears that the guy who first convinced the European Court of Justice to enforce this right to be forgotten, Mario Costeja Gonzalez, may have run into a similar situation. As you probably remember, Costeja brought the original case that argued that Google should no longer show results on searches for his name that linked to some stories in the late 90s about his being forced to sell some land to cover debts. The Court eventually decided that since this information was no longer "relevant," that under the data protection directive, it should be "delinked" in Google's database as a "privacy" measure.

Of course, as many people pointed out, in bringing that very case, the details of Costeja's financial transactions suddenly became relevant again. And, apparently that resulted in more people commenting on Costeja, including an article entitled "The unforgettable story of the seizure to the defaulter Mario Costeja Gonzalez that happened in 1998." And, as you might imagine, he wasn't too happy about some of the comments, and with this newfound power that he helped create in hand, he demanded that Google also take down links to such comments (most likely including that article linked in this paragraph).

And here's where it gets fun: Google refused. And so Costeja went to the Spanish Data Protection Authority to complain... and the Spanish DPA rejected his claim, noting that this information is now relevant in part because Costeja himself made it relevant again.

Now the DPA finds that there is indeed a preponderant interest of the public in the comments about the famous case that gave rise to the CJEU judgment of May 13, 2014 – and expressly reminds that the claimant itself went public about the details.
So, yes, the right to be forgotten has now made the story that was "successfully" forgotten originally so newsworthy that it may no longer be forgotten, and in fact is much more widely known. I think we've heard of some term for that before...

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Comment Re:Yes and no, but mostly no. (Score 1) 83

One, the spec is positively Byzantine. It makes OpenPGP look like a marvel of clarity. It's a very hard spec to implement correctly, and for that reason I distrust most of the S/MIME out there.

Two, S/MIME has some hardwired dependencies on SHA-1. (So does OpenPGP; S/MIME has more of them.) SHA-1 isn't looking very healthy right now. OpenPGP is migrating away from SHA-1 and the working group is actively developing a new spec. The S/MIME community isn't.

Comment Re:Yes and no, but mostly no. (Score 1) 83

The biggest problem with OpenPGP is that it doesn't protect the metadata.

It's about to. :)

Daniel Kahn Gillmor had a novel idea for how to use PGP/MIME in a creative way to extend protection to virtually all the email header information. Enigmail is implementing this, as are a few other groups. Metadata protection is coming to OpenPGP -- and very soon!

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