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Comment Be careful what you wish for... (Score 3, Insightful) 36

... Well, we'd love to comply with your potentially-lawful request and EU-search-warrant-equivalent, but in order to comply with your conversation confidentiality and privacy rules, we had to create encryption schemes designed from the very start to be unbreakable because we don't have the keys, nor a way to download them.

Comment Easiest answer (Score 5, Insightful) 122

Just ask your company. Even though they've decided not to continue using and improving that particular project, they gain nothing by withholding the fixes, but could gain developer goodwill (useful in future endeavors) and positive PR (always nice to have) by allowing the patches to at least be submitted upstream, even if they're not ultimately merged.

Comment Screen shots/sharing (Score 1) 205

If your organization is small enough, send screenshots together with the report, or if you have some kind of desktop sharing ability (remote assistance, Lync), take your dev through the process of how to trigger the bug. Just had an issue yesterday where they couldn't reproduce it, so we fired up a screen sharing process, they had me load up the Firefox debug console, and I went through the steps... turned out to be my mouse having a higher dpi than what they were using, so instead of getting floats, my system was handing them doubles.

Submission + - PDFCreator: malware and alternatives (pdfforge.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Recently some friends reported me that they had malware installed by pdfforge.org PDFCreator. At first I didn't believe them, but even the official forum confirms it. Although the authors of the software say the installation asks for permission, I cannot recommend this kind of software to anyone. Now I'm looking for alternatives. Which free software would you recommend? What do you think of the tactic of using toolbars, spyware and other suspicious extras coupled with open-source software installations?

Comment Prior art (Score 2) 174

Apple has at least 20 years of prior art to fall back on here. While it didn't always work exceedingly well, I clearly remember telling the Mac in my high school library's material office (where us helper rats did things like laminate posters for teachers) things like "Marie, run Myst," and a minute later, hearing the opening theme play.

Comment Prior art (Score 1) 878

Apple has at least 20 years of prior art to fall back on here. While it didn't always work exceedingly well, I clearly remember telling the Mac in my high school library's material office (where us helper rats did things like laminate posters for teachers) things like "Marie, run Myst," and a minute later, hearing the opening theme play.

Comment CFN: cleveland.freenet.edu (Score 1) 387

I see this very early entry to the public Internet is sadly missing from the article. CFN (https://wiki.case.edu/Cleveland_Freenet) provided message boards, IRC, USENet, MUDs/MOOs, and just about every other service provided by the fledgling Internet was there, including email (with gateways to FIDO, CIS, and a few others), to anybody with a modem, for free. The FreePort software was also published under (I believe) a 4-clause BSD license, giving rise to myriad offspring, some of which might still be around (though hopefully not running FreePort anymore).

Censorship

Submission + - Facebook censors local PR disaster (blogspot.com)

Mhrmnhrm writes: A group of school students in the NE Ohio Mayfield City School District have been raising money and taking an annual trip to the local Target retail store to help children in crisis situations. Until this year. Then when the news starts flying across Facebook, it becomes "Story Non Grata," and all posts/comments/responses to it summarily deleted.

Comment Re:Story submitter here (Score 1) 607

On a premium niche network, these are people that are specifically interested in a narrow segment of content that the network is carrying and not just putting that channel on because Son of Sharktopus is on. You know more about these people and can spend more money marketing to them because they have the money to spend not only on cable but on a premium channel.

Let's not forget that SG1 started on Showtime, and Game of Thrones is doing *quite* well on HBO. The market is there. Maybe Syfy can't do it, but someone can, and I hope they do.

EVE Online trailers in the middle of Battlestar Galactica. Can't target your advertising any better than that.
End of line.

Security

Submission + - China Penetrated NSA's Classified Operating System 2

Pickens writes: "Seymour M. Hersh writes in the New Yorker that after an American EP-3E Aries II reconnaissance plane on an eavesdropping mission collided with a Chinese interceptor jet over the South China Sea in 2001 and landed at a Chinese F-8 fighter base on Hainan Island, the 24 member crew were unable to completely disable the plane’s equipment and software. The result? The Chinese kept the plane for three months and eventually reverse-engineered the plane’s NSA.-supplied operating system, estimated at between thirty and fifty million lines of computer code, giving China a road map for decrypting the Navy’s classified intelligence and operational data. “If the operating system was controlling what you’d expect on an intelligence aircraft, it would have a bunch of drivers to capture radar and telemetry,” says Whitfield Diffie, a pioneer in the field of encryption. “The plane was configured for what it wants to snoop, and the Chinese would want to know what we wanted to know about them—what we could intercept and they could not.” Despite initial skepticism, over the next few years the US intelligence community began to “read the tells” that China had gotten access to sensitive traffic and in early 2009, Admiral Timothy J. Keating, then the head of the Pacific Command, brought the issue to the new Obama Administration. "If China had reverse-engineered the EP-3E’s operating system, all such systems in the Navy would have to be replaced, at a cost of hundreds of millions of dollars," writes Hersch. "After much discussion, several current and former officials said, this was done" prompting some black humor from US naval officers. “This is one hell of a way to go about getting a new operating system.”""

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