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Submission + - Bitcoin Queue Reaching Peak Levels (bitcoinqueue.com)

Matt_H writes: Following the recent surge in Bitcoin price, there has been a huge build-up of unconfirmed transactions forming over the last two days. Transactions were "stuck" if they didn't pay a sufficient mining fee, i.e. they stay in the memory pool of nodes without ever being included in a block for several hours instead of the usual, average ten minutes. In order to visualize the phenomenon, I have created these live charts showing stacked graphs of the Bitcoin queue stats.
Transportation

Volvo Wants You To Ditch Car Keys For Its New Smartphone App (dailydot.com) 293

An anonymous reader quotes an article on DailyDot: Lending your car to a friend could be as easy as sending a text. That's the future Volvo is imaging with its smartphone app that enables keyless entry for the driver -- and anyone with permission to enter. Announced earlier this year and now prominently on display at the New York International Auto Show, the app does away with key fobs and puts the key right on the user's phone. Using the device's Bluetooth capability, the app can do just about everything that a standard key could do -- from unlocking the doors to popping open the trunk to even starting the engine of the vehicle without turning the ignition. Beyond just convenience for the primary holder, the Volvo app also allows others to take the wheel without requiring a physical key. Users are able to grant digital keys to others, allowing them temporary or ongoing access to the car.
AMD

Report: Intel May Dump Nvidia, Turn To AMD For Radeon Graphics Licensing (pcworld.com) 124

An anonymous reader quotes a report from PCWorld: Intel could dump Nvidia for a licensing deal with AMD as the chip giant tries to prop up its patent portfolio. Currently, Intel is under a $1.5 billion licensing agreement with Nvidia, which the two companies signed in 2011. At the time, the two companies had spent years fighting each other in courts over patent licensing, and the agreement put all that litigation to rest. Intel's Nvidia deal is set to expire on March 17, 2017, and a recent report by Bloomberg claimed that Intel is now looking to cut a deal with AMD instead.
Chrome

Chrome For Android's Incognito Mode Saves Some of the Sites You Visit 69

An anonymous reader writes: A newly found bug in Google Chrome for Android means incognito mode really isn't as locked-down as it's designed to be. Some sites you visit while using the privacy feature are still saved, and can be retrieved simply by opening the browser's settings. Google Chrome for Android has had incognito mode since February 2012. Here is Google's official description of the feature: "If you don't want Google Chrome to save a record of what you visit and download, you can browse the web in incognito mode."
Space

Asteroid Risk Greatly Overestimated By Almost Everyone 236

StartsWithABang writes: When it comes to risk assessment, there's one type that humans are notoriously bad at: the very low-frequency but high-consequence risks and rewards. It's why so many of us are so eager to play the lottery, and simultaneously why we're catastrophically afraid of ebola and plane crashes, when we're far more likely to die from something mundane, like getting hit by a truck. One of the examples where science and this type of fear-based fallacy intersect is the science of asteroid strikes. With all we know about asteroids today, here's the actual risk to humanity, and it's much lower than anyone cares to admit.

Comment No evidence the murder was real (Score 1) 294

For those who are looking for information rather than hype, there is the source:

http://www1.icsi.berkeley.edu/~nweaver/UlbrichtCriminalComplaint.pdf

At the bottom of page 23, you can read the following:

"32. Although I believe the foregoing exchange demonstrates DPR's intention to solicit a murder-for-hire, I have spoken with Canadian law enforcement authorities, who have no of there being any Canadian resident with the name DPR passed to redandwhite as the target of the solicited murder-for-hire. Nor do they have any record of a homicide occurring in White Rock, British Columbia on or about March 31, 2013."

Comment Re:That's it.... (Score 1) 463

Yes you can (for instance swissvpn.net - untested by myself but heard from French cyber-refugees using it).

And as a Swiss citizen, I have to VPN through a Rackspace VPS that I rented mostly for Netflix! These (mostly) US copyright holders wouldn't want to accept my money otherwise, probably thinking I should pay them more, somehow, maybe, or not, in the future, if they suddenly want to... and that somewhat proves one of the points in TFA.

So, I'm sorry about paying you that money that you did not want in the first place, US copyright holders.

Isn't it ironic, don't you think... ? :-)

Comment Re:Downloading, not uploading: Yes, but... (Score 5, Informative) 463

I'm a Swiss citizen and I can confirm that while downloading is legal, uploading is technically illegal. On the other hand, mass-discovery methods to detect uploaders ARE illegal here as well, and there are no political intentions to criminalize copyright laws. Switzerland is a direct democracy, meaning that any new law that is passed may be challenged by the people by collecting at least 100K signatures (that's about 1.5% of the population) against it.

About two years ago, one of the three judges of our Supreme Court made it clear in an interview that he was personally against going after people for "personal copyright infringement", stating that when the majority of the people is found to be infringing some law, that law was likely to be biased against the general interest.

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