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Comment Re:Think it through. (Score 1) 287

much hand-wringing about all the lives that they would cost when sources were revealed. That didn't happen [bbc.com]

My credit card info was released during the Target hack; since none of it was used, that makes it okay and I should congratulate the ones responsible? In the name of what exactly?

huge amounts of documents like this can not be censored for potentially harmful or embarrassing personal information prior to their release

This is patently false. Snowden seemed to do a pretty good job of it.

Comment Re:Think it through. (Score 1) 287

In one case, the cables included the name of a Saudi who was arrested for being gay. In Saudi Arabia, homosexuality is punishable by death.

As the person was already arrested, I assume the govt already knows their name and their punishment is already lined up. Making this info widely public is probably the only way anyone else will ever know what happened to this person.

This this person request that this information get released? Just because the Saudi government knows about it doesn't mean the rest of the world should either.

Comment Re:Good to hear. (Score 1) 188

Maybe, but Intel does bear some responsibility for letting themselves fall behind during that time frame. I can remember back in the K7/Athlon days, there were some Athlon chips that outperformed the P4 chips that ran at the same clockspeeds (Some of the PIII chips even outperformed it). Intel eventually tried to compensate for this by upping the clock speeds and adding cache to the already flawed NetBurst architecture (like the P4 Extreme Editions). I can also remember Intel stating early on that they expected NetBurst to scale up to 10 Ghz, when it in fact never got about 4. The decision to only support RamBus in the initial P4 Williamette rollout also hampered things.

Comment Congress (Score 1) 154

This part of the article is interesting:

"Last week, 25 advocacy groups asked Congress to sue to enforce riders it passed on prohibiting spending of taxpayer money on the IANA transition"

Did Congress get a say-so in letting go of control initially? If riders were added to it, then that tells me that they agreed to handing over control at some point (with conditions). When did this happen?

Comment Re:I believe it (Score 1) 618

Withholding money won't help them at all with their addiction, but it makes you feel self-righteous.

By turning a cold shoulder to them, you are not helping them.

Having the government pay them money doesn't help them either, but I guess it makes you feel self-righteous.

Giving $1,000 lump sum payment every month to a person like that doesn't help them. They would still be in the same situation, only more easily able to feed their addiction. What everyone here is suggesting is actually worse.....we'd have to eliminate all welfare and treatment programs available to this person to cover the cost of UBI.

Comment Re:Very Basic Income (Score 1) 618

No one is suggesting that everyone gets a flat amount with no recovery in other programs and taxes.

Actually, that's the "Universal" in Universal Basic Income:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

" all citizens or residents of a country regularly receive an unconditional sum of money, either from a government"

The system you just described is no different than having separate tax brackets or a negative income tax.

Submission + - 1 In 3 Americans Report Financial Losses Due To Being Defrauded (helpnetsecurity.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With nearly half of Americans reporting they have been tricked or defrauded, citizens are concerned that the Internet is becoming less safe and want tougher federal and state laws to combat online criminals, according to the Digital Citizens Alliance. In the survey of 1,215 Americans, 46 percent said they had been the victim of a scam or fraud, had credit card information stolen, or had someone steal their identity. One in three Americans reported suffering financial loss – with 10 percent reporting that the loss had been over $1,000.

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