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Comment Re:Its been denied by McLaren (Score 1) 136

is not in discussion with Apple in respect of any potential investment.

So they could be in discussion about putting apple software in the McLaren vehicles. That is not against what they said.

The article flatly states:

"The California technology group, which has been working on a self-driving electric vehicle for more than two years, is considering a full takeover of McLaren or a strategic investment, according to three people briefed on the negotiations who said talks started several months ago."

So McLaren's response is 100% against what the article says.

Not only that, but Financial Times is still sticking with their story:
"Obviously we stand by our story despite McLaren's statement"
https://twitter.com/tim/status...

Comment Re:So many problems... (Score 1) 325

Meanwhile, the average American spends $775 dollars a year for Cable TV.
http://www.fool.com/investing/...

If you gave them a choice between an $600 EpiPen that they may not need (but may save their life) and missing out on Keeping up with the Kardashians or Monday Night football, I'm sure the later would win out.

Comment Re:Single payer system would avoid this problem (Score 1, Insightful) 325

There's only one company making the EpiPen (Mylan).....they can charge what they want, even with a single payer system. The single payer (the goverment) can either not pay for it at that price, or Mylan can choose not to sell it.

The only way this works in single payer systems currently is that Mylan is able to make up the loss by charging higher prices in non-single payer markets. If every single country in the world was single-payer, EpiPens wouldn't exist because every country would want to pay $1 per pen.

Comment Re:Okay, Tim. Show us the data (Score 1) 410

This goes both ways. The EU also needs to show the numbers they used to decide this, which they haven't yet by their own admission:

"If it was up to me, the non-confidential version of the decision would have been published yesterday, because that is another way of enabling everyone to see what we have decided and on what basis we have made this decision"

What's stopping them from doing this?

Comment What? (Score 1) 410

"There are very, very few figures in the public domain"

What figures is it that she's referring to? Apple is publicly traded, are there numbers about revenue that are being hidden from her? Maybe, and that would be a whole other set of crimes to tack onto tax evasion.

"More transparency would be a good thing, for example, a country by country reporting"

Well let's start with Belgium....surely she has access to those numbers?

"If it was up to me, the non-confidential version of the decision would have been published yesterday, because that is another way of enabling everyone to see what we have decided and on what basis we have made this decision"

So if it's not up to her, who is it up to?

Comment Re:Or the other reason.... (Score 1) 448

The fact the whole state is a river flood plain

The Baton Rouge area is 56 feet above sea level.
https://www.google.com/webhp?s...

and only stupid people build homes in a river flood plain?

I'm sure that the area you live in doesn't have any sort of vulnerability to any type of natural disaster. Go fuck yourself.

Comment Re:Think it through. (Score 2) 306

much hand-wringing about all the lives that they would cost when sources were revealed. That didn't happen [bbc.com]

My credit card info was released during the Target hack; since none of it was used, that makes it okay and I should congratulate the ones responsible? In the name of what exactly?

huge amounts of documents like this can not be censored for potentially harmful or embarrassing personal information prior to their release

This is patently false. Snowden seemed to do a pretty good job of it.

Comment Re:Think it through. (Score 1) 306

In one case, the cables included the name of a Saudi who was arrested for being gay. In Saudi Arabia, homosexuality is punishable by death.

As the person was already arrested, I assume the govt already knows their name and their punishment is already lined up. Making this info widely public is probably the only way anyone else will ever know what happened to this person.

This this person request that this information get released? Just because the Saudi government knows about it doesn't mean the rest of the world should either.

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