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Comment Re:Senile? (Score 1) 951

No, he was asked a leading question by someone about us being in a simulation, and answered it using the standard philosophical argument people use for the simulation argument. And then he clarified that he and his brother are no longer allowed to discuss these things in hot tubs anymore.

Everyone, I assume, has entertained these ideas and thought about them. He didn't bring it up, he wasn't out to make some real point. You can use similar arguments to argue that we are at, or close to, one of the last human generations, or that the traffic in the other lane really does go faster.

They are all examples of the observation selection effect, wherein you make the assumption that you as the observer are a randomly chosen sample in the population space. In my mind, that right there is the trouble with all the arguments using that principle. You start out with an assumption of the distribution of a random sample, then you _force_ that random sample to be you, and then make conclusions based on the (no longer) random sample. Any conclusions made after the force are not valid. Just like in magic, if every time the magician shows you a "random" card from a deck, it's the 3 of clubs, then obviously the whole deck contains only 3 of clubs, right?

Comment Re:Cool but so small (Score 1) 285

you can hit 4 petawatt/hours in a year with 456gigawatts of production (Making the assumption of constant production, which is a false assumption with wind and solar, but meh.) 3% in a single year isn't horrible.

What I'd really like to see is some sort of utility level grid storage solution take off. We could turn off half our coal plants today if we had enough batteries on the grid to be able to handle peak demand loads.

Comment Re:Playing Devil Advocate (Score 1) 355

It's a little exaggerated, because MS still has "QA Analysts", but they don't do what the old Test org did, they're merely telemetry analyzers. Over the past two years MS has completely transitioned the old test engineering org to either developers, Analysts, or get laid off. This is across all business units and products.

Comment Re:Not a problem, nothing to see here (Score 1) 218

Er? Access to Binge on is free for providers. No one has to pay to be added to the list.

This was called out specifically in their briefing, and is mentioned in their binge on materials.

Now, some providers co-marketed with t-mobile to get prime placement on the _advertised_ list. There's nothing wrong with that. If apple buys an Ad on TV, does that make Dell not exist?

Comment Re: Lovely summary. (Score 1) 1044

I read that blog post all the way through. For the first time, mind you, and nowhere does it state that he has a slate, and he's voting for it and that everyone else must do the same. In fact, he was a lot more creditable than I was. If everyone had done as he suggested, there would have been a lot fewer no-awards, which basically disproves your assertion that he was the one running the show.

Comment Re:Headline is Bad (Score 1) 1044

Wow, where did you get that from???

The "special awards" you are referring to are George RR Martin's "Hugo Loser" awards, that he's been handing out for more than 30 years. And it wasn't given to people who had been preselected to win, it was given to people who would have been on the ballot if not for Vox Day's ballot manipulations.

There was no rigging except for the rabid puppies, this magical cabal of people the puppies believe control access to Hugo awards are the actual fans who vote.

Comment Re:The Sad Puppies won. (Score 1) 1044

I love how everyone mentions Jim Butcher when trying to justify the puppies actions, but fails to talk about the fact that John C Wright had 3 of the 5 associated works nominations. And they were utter drivel.

If all the puppies had done was get Jim Butcher onto the ballot, we wouldn't be here talking about the Hugos today. No. They instead shut out everyone but their own nominees by taking up all 5 slots in as many categories as they could.

_Of course_ there was going to be a backlash. There was no "fixing". There was only angry fans seeing someone tromping shit over their lawn and saying "NO".

Comment Re:Headline is Bad (Score 1) 1044

There was no voting bloc. Toni was tainted by unethical ballot stuffing. If she had done the right thing, like Annie Bellet and Black Gate did, there would have been a groundswell of support for her, and she may have gotten a 2016 or 2017 Hugo free of Vox Day taint. There was no way she was winning a Hugo this year, nor should she want to, considering how she got onto the ballot. (And I'm saying that as someone who actually voted for her)

Toni is an amazing editor, but Baen doesn't really push the boundaries of scifi in it's works. They're like Scifi Mac'n'cheez. Comforting, easily digestible, exactly what you wanted, guilty indulgence.

Comment Re: Lovely summary. (Score 1) 1044

Wait, what?

The only cliques were the puppies. the 2500 no-awards were not organized, I voted no award for every category that had only puppy-backed folks on it, except for Toni Weisskopf, who I truly believe deserves a Hugo. I did it without some shadowy cabal of liberal elites telling me to, I did it because the puppies gamed the system, and the best way to discourage that sort of behavior is nuke it from orbit.

And I'm one of the people the puppies should be courting as an ally. I will read any Baen author sight unseen. I love hard scifi. I own every Heinlein novel published, and kept them, even after I converted to ebook only. They're the only paper books I still have. I love military scifi and space opera. I'm exactly the demographic that would vote for some of the things the puppies want to see on the ballot.

I still nuked them, and I would do it again if they attempted to stuff the ballot again.

And the very fact that they could stuff the ballot they way they did disproves the idea of there being a shadowy clique controlling the nominations.

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