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Submission + - Comey Denies Clinton Email 'Reddit' Cover-Up (politico.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The FBI concluded that a computer technician working on Clinton's email was not engaged in an illicit cover-up when he asked on the Reddit website for a tool that could delete a "VIP" email address throughout a large file, FBI Director James Comey said Wednesday. Republican lawmakers have suggested that the July 2014 Reddit post from a user believed to be Platte River Networks specialist Paul Combetta showed an effort to hide Clinton's emails from investigators.
However, at a House Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday, Comey said FBI agents concluded that all the computer aide was trying to do was replace Clinton's email address so it wouldn't be revealed to the public. "Our team concluded that what he was trying to do was when they produced emails not have the actual address but have some name or placeholder instead of the actual dot-com address in the 'From:' line," Comey said. Comey said he wasn't sure whether the FBI knew about the Reddit posting when prosecutors granted Combetta immunity to get statements from him about what transpired. However, he added that such a deletion wouldn't automatically be considered an effort to destroy evidence. "Not necessarily ... It would depend what his intention was and why he wanted to do it," the FBI director said.

Comment Re:not limitless (Score 1) 176

If I gave them the benefit of the doubt, perhaps it was strategic: price it high enough to limit the strain on their wireless network, but then similarly not so high that those who would actually use it and need it to be reliable are screwed over. Then sod off anyone who didn't like it. Not that I'd expect them to actually come out and say something like that.

But, let's keep going and try to make it look better for them.

If we assume they sprung for high-end enterprise grade access points that won't drop dead under the load of several hundred clients in the area given, then a dozen access points might be at least a five-figure deal right off the bat. If the requirements for "separate network" also indicate complete physical isolation then additional equipment would likely be required. In addition to some decent switching equipment, they might need a good firewall to withstand the abuse. Maybe additional expense if they extended isolation to where they sourced their Internet connection from, as well. Several media outlets might have requirements for uplink bandwidth necessary to stream their event if they aren't doing satellite uplink or something like that. Perhaps in that scenario it'd require someone getting an impromptu fiber run to the site of the event.

If the "tuning" they indicated was figuring out what propagation looked like post-setup and making adjustments to the placement of their access points that'd entail at a minimum a few more intern hours or at worst a few more access points.

I sincerely doubt that even given the above figuring they lost their shirt over this wireless network. But I'm sure at the same time if everyone and their grandmother took out portable MiFi units or turned on the hot spot feature for their phone the service would have been absolute shit and littered with clients and ad-hoc wireless devices operating on cross channels.

Comment Repeat cycle (Score 3, Interesting) 192

The forced upgrade cycle gave the usual OEM's ample time to roll out Windows 10 devices and most consumers will simply move to Windows 10 by way of failed or slow computer forcing their hand to upgrade that way. By that momentum alone Windows 10 adoption will continue to rise steadily.

Windows 7 will continue on as the new Windows XP in the professional space and we'll all repeat the painful process of resisting unwanted change for the next ten years.

Comment Guess its time to start job hunting again (Score 1) 271

Because when all the businesses in rural nowhere: population 'me' catch whiff of that I'm either going to be relegated to burger flipper salary equivalent wage to compensate, layoffs will force more small businesses into the hands of contract IT vendors (of which there are maybe two that matter around here), or forced to move again.

I suppose I'm in the minority considering $15/hr flipping burgers in California by comparison would be middle class here, but a sweeping adjustment like that will certainly do more harm than good around here where median income for nearly everyone is far below that 50k/year threshold.

Comment Re:$50 is 'high end' (Score 1) 288

I think the price point is $50 due to it competing with the establishment (e.g. brick and mortar movie theaters). If they charge too much, nobody will use the service. If they charge too little, they are competing with existing streaming services like Netflix and Hulu which would otherwise be declined such early access agreements which could result in lots of lawyers having a very merry Christmas this year.

I wonder how it would affect their gross revenue on these movies at the lower price point. Apart from the fact it could disrupt food and merch sales for the theaters, it would be cutting into the high price point ticket sales which would mean Michael Bay would have to wait at least an extra 2 years for his tenth private jet purchase. Can't have that now, can we?

Comment Probably not the greatest idea anyway. (Score 1) 303

Microsoft could continue to turn a profit on licensing like they do now with open source clauses. Hypothetically, there isn't a problem with that if they carried some BSD-like license for their OS. But, could you imagine the turmoil that would ensue? I can see it now: Dell PC's no longer ship with Windows, but Dell Workstation Foundation. Its like Windows, but with all the things they don't want you to have stripped out and replaced with their own proprietary spin. Who needs services when you have Dell work units? Or explorer when you have Dell clicky experience? OEM's do it with their phones all the time so what's stopping them from going full retard on the PC market, too?

Or worse, the OEM's void your warranty if you try to install vanilla Windows to avoid it to lock you into their solutions. I realize there are implications to some of the above that would break software, but we see the same things across Linux distributions all the time. Why would open sourcing Windows be any different?

Windows could never be open sourced anyway. There is code for libraries and other components licensed out from other vendors and all kinds of patent mess that would make it extraordinarily difficult for them to do it anyway. Its a cool thought, but its also a can of worms I hope they don't open.

Comment Under certain conditions? (Score 4, Interesting) 99

Oh aye, they did a good job of trying to sweep this one under the rug. If you rebooted any computer afflicted with this before the fix was deployed, you had a solid chance of rendering your system unbootable. With Panda broken, Windows often will not start. And even if it does start, Panda would swallow up several core system files, leaving you with a rather unusable system. We had several customers with dozens of workstations running Panda, and the first thing they thought to do was of course a reboot.

In some cases, Panda even requested a reboot to complete its hari kari.

Systems that were not rebooted were unusable while Panda held everything up.

Of course, Panda later released a tool to fix that if you rebooted your system. But it only really works if you can boot into, at a minimum, safe mode. But I still find it very hard to believe that if they were testing these updates that this would have happened. I have a feeling a chain of technicians got complacent about this, and a string of managerial staff is probably going to get fired as a result. I know they're not the only company to screw up an update like this, but this really is quite nonsensical.

Comment Misleading title is misleading (Score 1) 379

This still needs to pass the senate, and if enough commotion can be stewed up among the masses it'll make that whole process a bigger pain in the ass for them. And it should, because this is blatantly unconstitutional and they know it. Now would be the time to make it a point to your representatives that this is not what you want, and certainly doesn't represent the intents and demands of their constituents.

Comment Lawsuit will solve it for sure. (Score 1) 699

Just like the LimeWire lawsuit ended music piracy, right? Its so much easier to cling to a bad marketing model for dear life and sue anyone who gets in your way. Of course, contrary to their beliefs most of my own clients didn't even know what adblock was until I recommended it. I suppose while they're at it they should sue Microsoft, too, for introducing their own content blocker and opt-out do-not-track requests which uses the same lists as adblock.

IMO, win or lose they won't survive any longer for it.

Comment Too early for this discussion (Score 1) 239

Until a proposed system to make automated vehicles feasible on public roads in mass is proposed, developed, protocols and legal procedures released related to this come about, this is nothing but a scare topic making vague assumptions about things that aren't even a topic for development yet.

Comment Does incremental upgrade count? (Score 1) 391

I'd say the last "build" I did was in 2012, where I added a Radeon HD 7870, an extra 8GB of RAM and a SSD to my main PC. That PC has been incrementally built upon for years. It started as an office PC with an AMD Athlon T-bird CPU (impossible to keep cool), Radeon 7000 graphics (not HD of course), a 4gb IBM fireball hard drive and 256MB of RAM. I can't really think of any instance apart from my main PC where I've started from basically nothing since starting a career in IT (its amazing how easy corporations will just let their old servers and desktops go after an upgrade).

Nowadays most of the hardware available is more or less the same between vendors that the fun of sourcing the hardware is pretty much moot.

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