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Comment Re:Wonder why? (Score 1) 206

Mobile pay *does* give you the protection you are asking for. That was the point I tried to make (poorly), the mobile payment system works through the credit card system. The mobile payments work by adding a credit card to your mobile system. There was an additional "shrink wrap" contract from your credit card provider, that you must agree to before adding your credit card to your phone. The only new potential liability is that you must report to your credit card company if you lose your phone, just as you must timely report a credit card theft/loss. The main point is the credit card company is still on the hook for any charges made that you didn't authorize.

Comment Re:Canon's Diffractive Optics taken to a new level (Score 1) 60

I'll be excited when I can trade in my bulky, heavy, expensive SLR lenses for one perfect, cheap zoom. For all of the advances in digital sensors, lens tech has been virtually unchanged. Sure they threw on some expensive nanocoatings and made the glass aspherical but at the end of the day it's still the same heavy hunk of glass your grandparents had on there SLRs in the 50s. Never heard of the canon DO... interesting stuff. I am a Nikon shooter like my father before me.

Comment Re: slippery slope (Score 2) 822

While I agree it's entirely anecdotal, I have extremely mild asthma, smoke (even some cooking with poorly vented stoves) and exercise can be triggers for me. I didn't used to think it was a problem, I just lived with it. For a while now in public open air parks it has been illegal to smoke in Houston. I really appreciate being able to go to a park and not have to worry about it. I'm not sure if my having an attack, or multiple attacks over the course of time, triggered by smoke causes any "long term" health hazards, I don't know. But in the short term it's no fun at all, I can tell you that. Many asthma sufferers are worse than me.

I'm willing to have the discussion about if my privilege to breath without coughing over-weighs a smokers right to use a legal substance in a public park. I just think personally it's nicer now to go to a park and not worry about it.

Comment Re: This will only help the wealthy... (Score 3, Interesting) 144

It seems slashdotter's aren't the only ones who disagreed about the "E"

Quoted from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/....
Reflecting the treaty between the British and French governments that led to Concorde's construction, the name Concorde is from the French word concorde (IPA: [kkd]), which has an English equivalent, concord. Both words mean agreement, harmony or union. The name was officially changed to Concord by Harold Macmillan in response to a perceived slight by Charles de Gaulle. At the French roll-out in Toulouse in late 1967,[26] the British Government Minister for Technology, Tony Benn, announced that he would change the spelling back to Concorde.[27] This created a nationalist uproar that died down when Benn stated that the suffixed 'e' represented "Excellence, England, Europe and Entente (Cordiale)." In his memoirs, he recounts a tale of a letter from an irate Scotsman claiming: "[Y]ou talk about 'E' for England, but part of it is made in Scotland." Given Scotland's contribution of providing the nose cone for the aircraft, Benn replied, "[I]t was also 'E' for 'Écosse' (the French name for Scotland) — and I might have added 'e' for extravagance and 'e' for escalation as well!"[28]

Concorde also acquired an unusual nomenclature for an aircraft. In common usage in the United Kingdom, the type is known as Concorde without an article, rather than the Concorde or a Concorde.[29][30]


P vs. NP Problem Linked To the Quantum Nature of the Universe 199

KentuckyFC writes: "One of the greatest mysteries in science is why we don't see quantum effects on the macroscopic scale; why Schrodinger's famous cat cannot be both alive and dead at the same time. Now one theorist says the answer is because P is NOT equal to NP. Here's the thinking: The equation that describes the state of any quantum object is called Schrodinger's equation. Physicists have always thought it can be used to describe everything in the universe, even large objects, and perhaps the universe itself. But the new idea is that this requires an additional assumption — that an efficient algorithm exists to solve the equation for complex macroscopic systems. But is this true? The new approach involves showing that the problem of solving Schrodinger's equation is NP-hard. So if macroscopic superpositions exist, there must be an algorithm that can solve this NP-hard problem quickly and efficiently. And because all NP-hard problems are mathematically equivalent, this algorithm must also be capable of solving all other NP-hard problems too, such as the traveling salesman problem. In other words, NP-hard problems are equivalent to the class of much easier problems called P. Or P=NP. But here's the thing: computational complexity theorists have good reason to think that P is not equal to NP (although they haven't yet proven it). If they're right, then macroscopic superpositions cannot exist, which explains why we do not (and cannot) observe them in the real world. Voila!"

Comment Re:Its called paying attention (Score 1) 364


I Learned something new today. I had never heard of a "Michigan Left". It does seem like it would be safer for pedestrians and allow for a longer green light. The drawback being that to make a left turn you must first make one right turn going the wrong direction, change lanes to the left and then make a u-turn. I think I would find myself planning my route to avoid left turns if possible.

Comment Re:More BS from the group that brings you BS (Score 1) 987

Not sure how many of these are reachable behind the WSJ paywall. But I find it interesting how the WSJ publishes climate change minimizing articles in there "opinion" section and promotes them heavily on their site. At the same time also has excellent well written articles not as easy to find on the climate change in there hard news section.

Opinion piece attempting to poison the well before the report was released.

Fact based real reporting article published today.

Comment Re:Irreversible? (Score 4, Informative) 987

You can go to the bottom of the report page 38 for a chart and review the differences in the between a "low emission mitigation scenario" RCP 2.6 (one that we try to help the problem) and a high emission scenario (where we keep on keepin on.) RCP 8.5.

While temps go up for both, the mitigation scenario leads to a much more livable planet, closer to the one we live in today. the difference between scenarios is stark, an average of 3C difference by 2100. Children born today could easily live to see 2100, they would be 86 years old. So for me in Houston TX that means a hot summer day that was 100F will be 105.5F. The mitigation scenario could reverse the warming trend as early as 2050. You are correct that even the best case scenario doesn't allow for a return to current temperatures by 2100. In my mind the question is how long until we realize we our saving our own skins and make some hard decisions. Everybody want's a livable planet, but nobody want's to be the first to make the sacrifice.

Comment Re:In the kitchen (Score 3, Informative) 547

Yeah. I bet he was the only one (or a very few) at the time on Harvard's wifi and TOR. Then some good old fashioned police work, by telling the suspect some well crafted white lies closed the case. ie (we know what you did, sign this confession and make your life easier.) Unless I missed it, the court document never said they traced the specific message to him. Just him to TOR and TOR to the email. Then he admitted to it. At any rate, I'm glad they caught him. There are easier ways to avoid taking a test.

Comment Perhaps send a small animal as well. (Score 2) 92

I wonder if they sent a mouse or appropriate sized o2 to co2 animal how long the seeds could grow. I guess you'd also need a heater to keep the mouse alive in the cold of space. They could send a little bit of radioactive material to help regulate the temp. It just seems a shame to go all the way to the moon for a 5 day experiment.

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