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Comment Re:Main application? (Score 1) 76

I'm not quite sure why the iRiver IHP-120/140s didn't do FLAC out of the box. They supported some other specialty goodies(line level and optical in and out) that required more hardware and are probably even more esoteric; and they had ogg vorbis support, so it's not like they were MP3 only or wedded to whatever Microsoft was pushing at the time(the 300 series, though, leaned dangerously in that direction).

Luckily rockbox support is quite good on those models, which takes most of the pain away. LCD isn't good enough to do Doom justice, however.

Comment Re:Translation (Score 4, Informative) 30

If memory serves, the original logic behind the existence of this thing was dissatisfaction with Twitter jerking around 3rd party client developers in order to ensure that their freeloading peasants were exposed to enough advertising and had suitably limited control over layout, presentation, etc.

This service was going to be the one where developers came first and you were the customer, not the product. As far as I know that part of the vision was delivered; it just turns out that demand for "Like twitter, except basically empty" isn't all that robust, no matter how nice the service is.
Music

Cassettes Are Back, and Booming (fastcompany.com) 562

Long time reader harrymcc writes: By now, it isn't news that vinyl albums continue to sell, even in the Spotify era. But a new report says that sales of music on cassette are up 140 percent. The antiquated format is being embraced by everyone from indie musicians to Eminem and Justin Bieber. Fast Company's John Paul Titlow took a look at tape's unexpected revival, and why it's not solely about retro hipsterism.

Comment Re:Read the article (Score 1) 90

You get an email for *every* *single* *change* made to your tickets. Typical day:

mail 1: Your boss changed the delivery date of your task
1 minute later: Your boss changed the sprint.
30 seconds later: your boss changes the sprint back to its original
1 minute later: your boss attaches revised requirements document
30 seconds after that: revised unit testing spreadsheet.
1 minute later: email chain in which you discussed the change of scope w/boss pasted into comments.
2 minutes later: QA pastes the same email chain with an explanatory note regarding scheduling
1 minute later: boss changes the due date again.
30 seconds later: boss changes the sprint again.
30 seconds later: boss posts a question in the comments.
30 seconds later: boss changes the state of a ticket.
2 minutes later: you've been assigned a new task because X just went on vacation.
30 seconds later: Comment added to said task asking if you have bandwidth for this.
2 minutes after that: Said new task assigned to developer Y.

Dude. Fix your settings. Don't blame the tool.

Comment Re:Read the article (Score 5, Informative) 90

If you plan to work in an Agile environment then you might want to drop that attitude and make it your business to find out what these companies do.

Atlassian produces online collaboration tools like Jira and Confluence. Jira is a ticket-management system that lets you set up Kanban boards or SCRUM boards on which your team tracks the progress of tickets through the various stages to completion, and supports Agile visualizations such as burn-down charts. Confluence is a wiki-like tool for sharing documentation.

Plenty of employers are asking for Agile experience, so if you're familiar with these tools then it'll work in your favor.

Comment Re:Touch bar is a good idea (Score 1) 228

I don't disagree that Apple makes good hardware; my point was that (presumably because they care more about iDevices on the low end; and just don't care on the high end; and because, if only because MS and Intel have been cluebatting them as hard as they can for several years, PC OEMs have stepped up their game a little bit) Apple's offerings have gotten comparatively less exciting. They are still very good, unless you are one of the customers they decided they don't care about anymore; but the difference is not as dramatic as it once was.

Back in the bad old days, getting a genuinely thin and light PC laptop was downright hard. Sony and Fujitsu had some slightly eccentric offerings for moderately alarming amounts of money, some of the X-series Thinkpads were pretty good; but ibooks and powerbooks were often actually cheaper once you ignored the janky plastic crap and barely portable stuff in the bargain bin. That situation eased a bit once Intel dropped the pitiful farce that "Pentium 4M" was actually a mobile CPU and accepted that Pentium M parts were going to have to be available across the board, not just as a high end price-gouge product; but even once suitably low power CPUs were available, atrocious screens, shit build quality, and assorted other sins remained the rule.

On the desktop side, the minis were actually pretty aggressive(you could usually 'beat' them with some mini-tower eMachine that managed to be noisier despite having 10-20 times the volume to put a cooling system in; but that wasn't very impressive); The iMacs compared less well in a straight spec-fight; but good all-in-ones were practically nonexistent elsewhere; and the workstation hardware tended to get gimped GPUs; but was otherwise a pretty solid competitor among its peers.

All of this just isn't as true anymore. You can't get a screen that isn't something of an embarrassment for less than ~$1400(there is the macbook air; but 1440x900, in 2017, for $1000?); and once you move north of a thousand bucks; PC laptops suck far less than they used to. The macbook pros are nice; but more 'nice' than 'pro'. iMacs are still pretty good as AIO options; but the less said about the 'Mac Pro' the better.

I have no interest in arguing that what Apple is doing is bad business, they certainly make enough money on it; but it is pretty hard to be surprised that it isn't doing OSX's market share any favors.

Comment Jython, not JPython (Score 1) 129

Nitpicking, buy it was JPython in 1997
It has been Jython since 1999
https://wiki.python.org/jython...

> I do not know why anybody would even think of using a programming language without static typing.

- Dynamically typed programming languages are more productive when writing smaller quantities of rapidly evolving code.

- It is mainly a library and an ecosystem issue. Python tends to have all the modules I need, while Haskell, OCaml and Scala often don't... and they often seem to be much easier to pick up and use.

For example, Pandas equivalents are much less mature in other ecosystems. On language merits alone, I should be using Scala more than Python, but in practice, Python modules win me over.

I wanted to memoise a function. To look up a module and put in the couple of lines (an import and a decorator) needed to achieve that probably took a couple of minutes in Python, and I was back to the real meat of my code. I would have spent much longer in Java.

Comment Re:Not a huge surprise... (Score 3, Insightful) 228

PC laptop screens went through some dark, dark times. The cheap crap still has lousy screens; but there was some time where it was hard to find anything decent, at any price(especially after the harrowing of the 4:3 panels and the massacre of what few 19:10s existed). At least now you can get decent panels again, if you stay out of the bargain basement.

Comment Not a huge surprise... (Score 5, Interesting) 228

While they continue to pull defeat from the jaws of victory with baffling regularity(eg. needlessly atrocious touchpads for no obvious reason); it's amazing how much less-bad your average PC laptop is today, when compared to the race-to-the-bottom and "Yeah, it's a 15in low-res screen and 2 inches thick" era. Models that can go directly head-to-head with Apple's finest are rarer; but you can often save enough money, vs. the really classy Apple gear, that a few minor sins can be overlooked. Combine that with Apple's more or less total neglect of anything desktop/workstation, which is a boring segment but moves a lot of hardware; and the fair success of Chromebooks as practically-disposable cheap 'n portable options; and you have a few reasons why OSX marketshare might not be doing as well outside of the truly devoted.

Back in the day, an ibook/macbook was both good and actually one of the cheaper options if you needed something small and light; mac minis stacked up reasonably favorably against all but the most atrocious cheapy towers; and Mac Pros were pretty respectably priced workstation offerings. I remember, back when they were still doing the intel-based 'cheese grater' case Pros; we were a Dell shop but when we priced out the Pros vs. equivalent Precisions our Dell rep turned a slightly unhealthy color and had to cut us a deal to make it worth going with those rather than just bootcamping the macs. That...isn't exactly...how the world works anymore.

Comment Re:Good! (Score 1) 202

I certainly wouldn't bet against that; I just don't think that they need to kill cmd.exe to do it.

It's just shell, and not even a terribly good one; and the shell is only as powerful as the programs and commands you can use it to invoke. Going pure GUI tends to involve some loss of control/dumbing down, just because you can't realistically cram everything a CLI can do into a GUI that any sane person would want to look at; but if the OS vendor doesn't want you to do something, making it impossible via CLI isn't a particularly different problem than making it impossible via GUI.

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