Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Comment Re: Removal of the 3.5mm jack will jack up in-car (Score 1) 289

USB and Bluetooth integration are increasingly common in new cars, starting from 2011 or so. But in many cases the Bluetooth is limited to phone calls and can't do streaming audio. CarPlay has even less penetration, and is only in cars (at all) from 2014 on, is not yet remotely ubiquitous in new cars, and likely won't become moreuniversal until the federal backup camera mandate kicks in in 2018 and rail-roads all cars into having in-dash touchscreens.

Comment Removal of the 3.5mm jack will jack up in-car inte (Score 2) 289

One of the big wins Apple scored in the past decade, outside their own industry, was the way they spurred automobile manufacturers to add iPod/iPhone integration. Now, the average car on today's roads is about 11 years old. Most cars of the mid-2000's provided just a 3.5mm aux Jack. I realize Apple's customer base skews to the higher end of the income spectrum, and likely drives newer cars, but that still will leave a large number of customers out in the cold because they don't have the means (or willingness) to change their car.

Comment Re: This worries me (Score 1) 175

The original article mentions that the survey asked parents how old the kid was when they gave them the phone, but didn't ask if the phone had service or not.

It's really common for parents to hand-me-down their old, no longer activated phones to their kids. It's also really cheap and easy to buy pre-paid Android phones and not even activate them.

Comment Re:Bbbbut Capitalism (Score 2) 224

All launch customers desire "mission assurance", that is, effective management of the risk involved in getting their payload into space. Commercial customers achieve this mission assurance by buying insurance that pays out in the event a launch failure. In lieu of purchasing insurance, the US Government "carefully shepherds" taxpayers' money by incentivizing ULA, via cost-plus award fee, to design and build their launch vehicles with an extremely high attention to detail, achieving a level of mission success that is the envy of the launch industry.

Comment Re:Delusions of privacy (Score 1) 150

As you said, the NSA is likely able to compromise the iPhone today. That said, the FBI's motive is to obtain convictions. To do requires the presentation of evidence in open court. The FBI can't collaborate with the NSA, even if the NSA would play ball, because the defense would have a field day with the NSA's blatant Executive Order 12333 violation. For those following along at home, EO 12333 specifically forbids action by the intelligence community against "US persons". Snowden's disclosures have made abundantly clear that the NSA could give two shits about Executive Order 12333, but they do care about their exploits. Not revealing sources and methods is sort of tradecraft 101.

Comment Re:Dishonest to say favor will result ... (Score 1) 150

The intelligence community (cough, NSA) has in all likelihood already compromised iOS (and Android, and BlackBerry, Windows, you name it.) Unfortunately for the FBI, the NSA (reasonably) doesn't want to burn its sources and methods by having them disclosed in open court. Their assistance, in a case against "US persons" would also constitute a rather obvious violation of Executive Order 12333. Sure, the NSA flouts EO 12333 everyday and twice on Sunday's, but it's not being discussed in an open court. Defense attorneys would have a field day with "fruit of a poisoned tree" arguments.

The FBI is looking for something that is disclosable in open court, and that will withstand defense scrutiny. Success in this case sets the precedent that Apple (or any other hardware/software vendor) can be compelled, via the All Writs Act, to circumvent any security features they've built into their devices. Every DA with a phone in their evidence locker is going to come out of the woodwork to get those phones unlocked. The FBI gets their evidence, and whatever juicy exploits NSA has stay safely out of public view.

Beyond that, though the original court order gave Apple the option (which they would almost certainly exercise) to have physical custody of the subject phone to install the GovtOS, it also specified that, if Apple exercised this option, they would host a computer, provided by the FBI, that would be connected to the subject phone. The FBI would then remotely operate said device, connected to the subject phone, for the purpose of carrying out the brute-force PIN attack.

Much ado has been made of how the GovtOS software image would circumvent the device wipe, cooldown and direct PIN entry features of the lock screen, to allow remote PIN entry from a connected, FBI computer. Though not specified in the order, logically, Apple would need to remove the "Trust this computer" protective feature, so the phone would give the FBI 'puter the time of day. Then they connect it to the phone. At which point the FBI will be in a position to pwn the phone, and download the software image from the phone.

TL;DR: Totally NOT Orwellian fantasy!

Comment Re:This problem really shouldn't exist. (Score 1) 262

This... More so than any of the other American major league sports, the NFL has inked sponsorship deals for product placement. As an example, Colin Kaepernick was famously fined $10k by the NFL last year for wearing a pair of pink Beats headphones during a post-game press conference. The only reason he's not blowing a gasket over this is that he's too busy deluding himself into believing he'll win the Deflategate appeal.

Comment Re:This is what I look forward most in hydrogen ec (Score 2) 163

Fuel cells are the only way to get thermodynamic efficiency that is remotely competitive with battery electric vehicles. At the moment, fuel cells still have high initial cost, and short service life, relative to the batteries in battery electric vehicles. Sure, they'll ride down the price curve and up the performance curve as the technology matures. But then you get to the hydrogen. All sustainable, carbon-neutral methods of generating hydrogen involve using an energy source for electrolysis of water. Which takes as much energy as the hydrogen itself will release when it is "combusted" with atmospheric oxygen back into water. Adding insult to injury, hydrogen is a gas at standard temperature and pressure. In order to carry a quantity sufficient to provide useful driving range, more energy must be expended to pressurize the hydrogen to thousand's of PSI for storage on-board the vehicle.

Slashdot Top Deals

"May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." -- George Carlin

Working...