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Comment Re:Zero Risk (Score 1) 236

Let's do something nice on Slashdot for a change: a Colorado breweries love-in!

I'll start: GREAT DIVIDE. Probably my favorite from that state, right now. (Maybe because it's not distributed in my state, so I treasure it like I treasure other hard-to-gets.)

Avery and Oskar Blues are other near-favorites. Steamwork (though I'm not sure they package). Ska can be good.

What's yours? I wanna go on another CO shopping trip in a few weeks. Help me out.

Comment Re: Having a 'bad gene'... (Score 1) 651

This. It's not that (or not only that, at least) more people are dying of cancer, or even of specific cancers in this day and age; it's a combination of things like 'instead of having ten people dying of 'consumption' or 'old age' we now break it out into specific cancers' and 'well, a hundred years ago, they usually died of something else, first.'

And yeah, until very recently, kids were 'shy' or 'withdrawn' and would have undesirable traits beaten out of them; metaphorically or literally.

Comment Re:What is the point of view? (Score 3, Informative) 651

Well, think of it this way.

A housing development has a rash (pun intended) of break-ins.

They get together and decide to institute mandatory installation of alarm systems.

The number of break-ins goes down in direct proportion to the number of houses have alarm systems installed, until all the houses have them installed, and the number of break-ins is almost, but not quite, zero per year.

After a while, people start to think 'we don't have a break-in problem, why are we mandating these alarm systems?'

New houses under construction start to be built without alarm systems. What do you suppose happens to the break-in rate?

The price of freedom (from preventable disease) is eternal vigilance (of vaccination rates.)

It's real easy to say 'we don't need vaccines' when you've never seen a playmate in polio braces, or when pictures of a wall full of children in iron lungs is a quaint historical anachronism. When you don't have an Uncle Bob who's sterile from a bout of mumps. When having a dead sibling is unusual, and probably the result of accident or something, and not 'measles.'

Comment Re:Minefield (Score 2) 550

It's weird. I remember when a sitting president was sued for sexual assault, and at the time Democrats didn't seem to find the allegations credible. Nor the rape allegations. Well, I'm sure they had their reasons beyond just, you know, rank hypocrisy.

If Democrats didn't have double standards, they'd have no standards at all. :-P

Comment Re:Minefield (Score 1) 550

Has it now gotten to the point where I am more likely to be lynched for being like Hugh Hefner than Bruce Jenner?

The way they're going, you're more likely to be lynched for continuing to refer to Bruce Jenner by the name his parents gave him at birth.

Of course, the bastards will then come after me for this post because IDGAF about Bruce's delusions...or theirs.

Comment Re:Minefield (Score 1) 550

But with all that Trump has said or promoted, I've not seen yet where he came out to promote the agenda that is against equality in matters of gender and race.

You haven't seen him say it because he hasn't said it. The extreme-left noise machine has thrown out all of charges, and their stenographers in the "mainstream" media have reliably parroted it far and wide.

Comment Re:I hope Apple Pay will die (Score 1) 284

You have to do that regardless, every few years, when you get a new card. I use a Web-only Mastercard. It used to be valid for one year. (They seem to have changed it, it's now valid for two years). I have no problem doing that. Usually, I just bother updating the card when a system tells me that my current card stored isn't valid any more. It grows organically over time.

Comment Re:I've come to dread these events... (Score 1) 142

Woot recently had the Latitude 7370 available, starting under $600 for a refurb. Near as I can tell, it's the same basic design as the XPS 13, but with Win10 Pro instead of Home and some more business-oriented features. (On closer examination, it also looks like it has a second Thunderbolt port instead of a second USB port.) I've not gotten around to installing Linux on it yet, but once secure boot was switched off, it ran SystemRescueCD and the latest Gentoo LiveDVD from a USB stick without any issues. Nice little machine. It's small enough that you can use it on a plane even if you're not in first class or an exit row...most other notebooks are so large that either the screen will be at an uncomfortable viewing angle or the front edge will be poking you in the chest. Already took a look at the manual. Except for RAM (soldered on), everything's upgradable once you unscrew the bottom cover. Mine has a 128GB M.2 SSD; if anything's a candidate for an upgrade, that is, especially if I'm going to have it dual-boot.

Comment Re:huh? (Score 1) 146

A decade or two ago (I'm not really sure when he wrote it)) Brad Templeton suggested something like this as a fix for various problems, especially trademark. My take is that the basic idea is that TLDs are already meaningless, so diversifying them into increased meaninglessness does no damage while offering some benefits. (e.g. makes monopolizing certain words harder, makes it easier to try out new registration policies, etc)

Comment Re:Does anybody ... (Score 1) 475

how do you cut off *his* internet connection without cutting off the entire Ecuadorian Embassy's internet connection?

Go to the rack and unplug the ethernet cable whose other end is in Assange's room. Change the wifi password and only tell people the new one along with the instructions "don't share your password, especially with that Assange guy."

The "state actor" was Ecuador, or else it didn't happen. That's the only government capable of doing it.

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