Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Free Speech (Score 1) 633

Are you joking?

Explain to me the difference, if any, between Palmer 'retaliating' against Clinton, and Insomniac 'retaliating' against Palmer.

ANY claim Palmer can make to 'free speech' must also extend to Insomniac. Any claim Palmer makes against Insomniac must also apply against Palmer. Either both Palmer and Insomniac have the choice of who to associate with, who to engage in commerce with, and to attempt to sway others to similar thinking, or either of them can.

Comment Re:The size of the farm shouldn't matter.... (Score 1) 181

Apple's dictation software (PlainTalk) was running on System 7.1 Pro 20 years ago, using local hardware 100's of times slower than what I have in my pocket. Basic NLP code was running on the Newton, which was 1000x slower and still managed to handle the basics on top of the handwriting recognition. "Speakable Items" let me run user-writable AppleScripts to automate tasks and was just missing dictatable variable names.

I helped Apple wreck a nice beach.

Comment Re:Not sure you have a lot of options? (Score 1) 210

If you do a fresh install of Windows 7 these days? The update process is PAINFUL! You'll literally need to leave the PC downloading updates for a good 8-10 hours or more before it finally starts doing anything obvious.

That's why you slipstream updates into your installation image. Slipstreaming the various post-SP1 patch rollups as they're released will slash your installation time significantly, and there are only a relative handful of them at this point.

The only thing slipstreaming doesn't cover is updates to the .NET Framework. For whatever reason, they're not provided in a compatible format, but only as installer .exes. RT Seven Lite, however, will create an image that will run these installers (or others) in a post-Win7-installation step. It also facilitates slipstreaming the other updates, so it's useful to have on hand.

Comment Re:Stupid (Score 1) 50

Name one country that doesn't mind its military bases being photographed every couple of months and being published for anyone to look at.

If Google is photographing your bases and publishing it, the problem isn't that they published it. The problem is that Google was able to successfully photograph it.

If Google can photograph your base, then your adversary can too. And Google is almost certainly doing things in the nicest way possible, obeying laws, not generally willing to put up with planes being shot down as merely an inevitable cost of business, etc. A real adversary doesn't have those constraints.

Attempting to censor Google is symptom-treating, and really, it's to a comical degree. It's way out there; this isn't merely "slightly stupid." This totally reeks of closing barns doors after horses have gotten out... except that there will be an update in a few months and of course they'll want that blurred too,because they still haven't closed the barn door. It's more like they just don't want people talking about the barn door, that they have already decided they're never going to close.

YOUR HORSES ARE OUT, NUMBNUTS!!! WE ARE LOOKING AT YOUR BARN DOOR BECAUSE IT'S HYSTERICALLY FUNNY THAT YOU KEEP LEAVING IT OPEN, not because we want to steal your horses, which aren't in the barn anyway. If the horses were really still in the barn, then you would have shot down the photographer.

Comment Re:Incoming liberal asspain (Score 1) 847

And maybe what both parties need to get out of the trench warfare that they currently have as well.

Maybe, but maybe not.

The parties only hear two language: votes and money. Whatever they're doing, appears to be working for them (contrary to what you suggest, that they change). You write that it's bad, but on election day I think they are going to hear that what they did was good.

You're giving a treat to the dog (and saying "bad dog") every time he barks, and kicking him (and saying "good dog") whenever he sits and cutely wags his tail. Guess what kind of dog you're going to have.

The only good news I'm seeing in this election, is that somewhere around 10-15% of voters have finally decided to stop actively supporting and approving them, compared to single digits in previous years. But a strong majority still approves, applauds, and rewards.

I think the election night numbers are going to show: Clinton and Trump were excellent choices, America's top two favorites. Prove me wrong, America. I don't care what you say to me; I'm watching to see what you say to them and everyone else.

Comment Re:Asinine. (Score 1) 423

Whaddup, fellow liberal gunny?

The issue isn't 'gun violence,' the issue is 'violence.' Somebody wants to massacre a room full of whoever, they're going to massacre a room full of whoever, guns or no guns. Chainsaw, propane tank, backpack full of molotovs (mix in egg whites in the right proportion for simple napalm,) cube van, diesel/fertilizer bomb, baseball bat, whatever.

Comment Re:Are you smarter than a Trump supporter? (Score 3, Informative) 525

What I don't understand is why Clinton supporters always resort to insults.

It's all they have. They can't run on her record or her predecessor's record, they have to know their policy prescriptions stink on ice and would be about as popular with the public as pralines-and-dick ice cream...so out come the insults.

Comment Re:Tax (Score 5, Informative) 539

From what I can see, there's a correlation between being religious and being conservative, and also a correlation between being progressive and donating.

If by that second point you meant an inverse relationship, then yes. Amazon's description:

We all know we should give to charity, but who really does? In his controversial study of America’s giving habits, Arthur C. Brooks shatters stereotypes about charity in America-including the myth that the political Left is more compassionate than the Right. Brooks, a preeminent public policy expert, spent years researching giving trends in America, and even he was surprised by what he found. In Who Really Cares, he identifies the forces behind American charity: strong families, church attendance, earning one’s own income (as opposed to receiving welfare), and the belief that individuals-not government-offer the best solution to social ills. But beyond just showing us who the givers and non-givers in America really are today, Brooks shows that giving is crucial to our economic prosperity, as well as to our happiness, health, and our ability to govern ourselves as a free people. [Emphasis added.]

Slashdot Top Deals

"The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was." -- Walt West

Working...