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Comment Re: class action suit (Score 1) 117

Most likely, Microsoft will wind up having to pay a settlement class consisting of just about anyone who owned Windows 7 and can show their system now runs Win 10 thanks to the online upgrade.

What I want to know is, how do I get Microsoft to compensate me for the time and effort of successfully preventing the upgrade, and my increased risk due to the fact that I've had to disable security updates to do so?

Comment Re:Too bad we can't own software anymore. (Score 2) 117

Bullshit. The Uniform Commercial Code and the doctrine of first sale says I own the (copy of the) software. The only thing that says I don't is a fictional, unenforceable, worthless alleged-document that isn't a valid contract because (a) it's a contract of adhesion presented after the sale is complete and (b) offers me no consideration since I already have the right to do everything it's offering me by virtue of having already bought the software.

Comment Re:What do you need? (Score 1) 273

TBH, I'd rather lose the numpad than deal with an offset trackpad. I spend vastly more time clicking on things than I do entering numbers. If I were an Excel jockey I could see the need for redundant number entry hardware but as a programmer I'd rather have a centered keyboard and trackpad instead.

Comment Re:What do you need? (Score 1) 273

Those specs look nice but I noticed that it's yet another notebook with the trackpad offset as far to the left as possible. Why it's so hard to get a decent notebook with a centered trackpad? I usually use my right hand to operate the trackpad so a left-aligned trackpad is rather unergonomic - but I wouldn't want a right-aligned one either because I often switch to my left hand when I'm holding something in my right.

It's one of the reasons why I liked Apple's designs until Jon Ives went insane in 2012. Unfortunately my Mid-2012 non-retina MBP won't last forever and at some point I'll have to replace it. I'd like to do so with something that doesn't require me to lug around a portable trackball when I'm on the go.

Comment Re:GB is doing it, China is doing it (Score 1) 82

Over the last 35 years... This demonstrates the strength of authoritarianism... But things are rapidly changing, and beginning to show the downside of authoritarianism.

Funny, I thought the downside of authoritarianism was shown during the period immediately proceeding the 35-year one you mentioned. Did the Chinese (or any other government, for that matter) learn nothing from the Cultural Revolution?

Comment Re:Why not just use Splenda? (Score 1) 326

Actually, the Mayas and Aztecs didn't really eat chocolate. They made a drink out of cocoa; solid chocolate bars were developed in 1847's Great Britain. Milk chocolate and the modern creamy texture were both developed in Switzerland in 1875 and 1879, respectively. Solid chocolate only became popular after that; the original bars were gritty and bitter (and if you've ever get the chance to try unconched chocolate you'll understand why nobody wanted that shit).

Oh, and you forgot about the Olmecs who first cultivated cocoa well before the Mayas and Aztecs were relevant.

(BTW, I recommend visiting a chocolate museum if you get the chance, especially if you can get a guided tour. Interesting stuff. The Imhoff Chocolate Museum in Cologne is pretty good.)

Comment Re:...Extinguish (Score 3, Informative) 74

Microsoft had nothing to do with this beyond picking up the pieces. Cyanogen Inc.'s penchant for spectacularly bad business decisions (such as offering an unrestricted worldwide license to one company while simultaneously offering an exclusive license for the Indian market to another) doomed the company from the beginning. And PR moves like "We'll kill Google by releasing a product based on one of Google's products." didn't help either.

A shame, really. Affordable handsets with known-good CM compatibility, no crapware and actual, real updates would've been a nice thing. But due to Cyanogen's leadership being farcically inept that just wasn't possible.

Comment Re:And flat look [Re:Infinite web pages] (Score 1) 332

Maybe the post I was replying to was. Flat isn't necessarily a problem, but having no borders at all could be. This goes double for the computer-illiterate: without the borders and shading mimicking physical controls, buttons are becoming increasingly abstract and thus ever more difficult to recognize as being clickable, especially for people who didn't learn the analogy back in the "beveled-edge pseudo-3D" day.

My only point was that (contrary to the previous poster's implication that 1989 was some kind of primitive age), UIs from back then were actually pretty usable because they were designed by UX engineers instead of graphic artists. Sure, they were ugly, but at least you could tell what was a button and what wasn't.

Comment Re:Agile is good for some teams & projects, ho (Score 1) 332

Sure, there are occasionally the huge changes that some customer decided they couldn't live without, but those types of changes hurt agile shops too.

But usually not as much, because with shorter development cycles the customer has the opportunity to realize they need the changes earlier.

Comment Re:And flat look [Re:Infinite web pages] (Score 1) 332

Similar annoyance points for the "flat" look. You cannot even tell a button is a button, and entry box boundaries are washed out. Shade the fsckers, people! It's not 1989.

Well that's the problem, isn't it? In 1989, UIs were designed so that it was easy to tell which controls were what.

Comment Re: Change the law (Score 1) 1425

Unlike the Republican South from where people are leaving in droves for Blue states.

FYI, that's not true. (I'll be charitable and not accuse you of lying or jump on the "fake news" meme bandwagon... but I could have.)

Several Southern states, including both Carolinas and Georgia (plus pseudo-Southern Texas and Florida) are all growing faster than California.

On the bright side, pretty much all that growth is occurring in the "blue" urban parts of those states.

Comment Re: Standing. (Score 1) 99

Theoretically, that should be the arm of the federal government in charge of copyrights. Or possibly the DoJ.

Or any member of the public. After all, a plain reading of the phrase "in the public domain" means exactly that: that it is "owned" by every member of the public, collectively, so why shouldn't every "owner" have standing?

Comment The First Rule... (Score 3, Interesting) 254

...of Usenet is of course, "you do not talk about Usenet." I'm breaking that. Sorry.

More importantly in this case, Second Rule of Usenet is "Usenet can't be subverted by its owner because, as a decentralized service, it doesn't have one." And that's why it needs to be supported instead of centralized shit like Reddit!

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