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Comment Re:a personal experience (Score 1) 226

It sounds immensely like you belief you hit an existence controlled or observed by an entity other than known ones.

It sounds to me like the GP hit upon a mode of perception of their own internal processes, by their own mind, and that no "outside" observer was invoked in these perceptions.

It sounds to me like a thought arose that contained an interesting question and jolted them from that mode of perception. But nothing in the GP's post sounds to me like it confirmed or stated any belief in kind of entity,

So the parent's message, quoted above, sounds to me *almost entirely* a statement about the author's own beliefs, masqueraded as a statement about someone else's. I.e. a projection, seeing things in the GP's post which aren't there.

With regard to saying anything about "known entities" as though those are factual things. It is debatable whether one's mind, one's internal process, and consciousness and sub-consciousness, are "known entities" or simply fantasy constructions or theories. I've met people I respect who hold that those ideas are dubious and should not be taken too seriously when making important decisions. Which leaves me wondering, what is meant by "known entities"?

Out of the two messages, the parent and the GP, the parent message strikes me as the more religious and dogmatic. This is because the GP showed that they were exploring a question about what is known to them personally by the best available empirical means, while the parent's message contains only statements about their own beliefs (as I see it, masqueraded via projection) without any empiricism indicated.

Comment Re:Strokes (Score 1) 560

Most strokes are due to clots, cutting off the supply to some areas of the brain; rather than bleeds.

Recovery from all major strokes, as far as I know, involve the brain doing some amount of "rewiring" to replace the functions of damaged areas, over a long period of time. In the short term, to the best of my knowledge you want to restore blood flow as quickly as possible to minimise damage to the deprived areas, as well as stimulating the brain in a variety of ways. (But you don't want bleeds or swelling due to over-reactions.)

In those circumstances, persistent, long-term reduced blood flow does not sound necessarily beneficial to me, as a guess. But I would welcome objective research because the short-term and long-term effect on symptoms is far from obvious.

That said, I have known stroke patients who reported that cannabis caused some of their symptoms to improve, such as slurring of speech and fluid mobility. Being self-reported it is hard to be sure objectively, and also perhaps there are short term effects which don't last. But the same symptom improvements are reported by some MS sufferers, and there is some scientific research to support it in their cases.

Comment Re: Why would this concern Trump? (Score 1) 184

Actually, only a Christian parent sends their kid to Sunday school.

That statement is demonstrably false.

My parents are not Christian, never have been, and neither am I. I am definitely not baptised, and as far as I know, neither are they.

But I was still sent to Sunday school. I think it is quite common.

Comment Re:Ironically (Score 1) 609

Or, triggering article 50 would effectively overturn the 1973 EEC Act, as it would remain on the books as formally the will of parliament, subverted by the prerogative power being used in direct opposition to it.

When the will of parliament is expressed, the government is supposed to follow it, not openly subvert it.

Comment Re:Huh who knew? (Score 1) 609

What's weird is trying to claim the Government can't do something without Parliament. Isn't Parliament the government?

No it isn't.

In stories such as this, the Government means what some call "the executive branch", and Parliament means what some call "the legislative branch".

It is quite often that those two are in opposition to each other.

Yes they are all, together "the government", and it's confusingly the same word, but that's not how it's being used in stories like this.

Comment Re:time to dial back the shill (Score 1) 299

I have a top-end Macbook Pro from 2013 running OSX 10.9, and indeed, it freezes and won't wake every few weeks. More often recently.
It's annoying that I lose application state, but at least I have confidence that I can hold down the power button for long enough to force-restart it.

Comment Re: Smart move (Score 1) 168

Clarification is great, and memories suck.

I agree clarification is a good thing. And lack of clarity, bad memory, and the jerked-aroundness that ensues from that is a terrible thing.

But sometimes, some "can you summarise every detail in an email" people appear to be trying to ensure that their boss/peer/coworker is so busy writing every micro-fact down to a ridiculous standard of hyperclarification that it has become a means of CYA-ing the relationship to death and there is hardly any functional work possible.

The objective is usually to get useful stuff done. If a coworker is a time sink because the relationship is such that they want all the micro-facts hyperclarified, I can sympathise with avoiding them. Though if that's what it's come to, there's probably a reason that needs addressing.

Comment Re: Smart move (Score 1) 168

He "tries" is tacit acknowledgement that he has to put effort into not being a sleaze. He just doesn't realize that his tendency is towards sleaze

I think everyone's tendancy is towards "sleaze" as defined in this thread.
I don't think I've ever met anyone who doesn't jerk other people around to some extent.
I think it's unavoidable, because it's what I see everyone do.

So I figure, the ones making an effort are at least making an effort.

And the ones who think they don't need to make an effort, their actions are worse, but they're not self-aware enough to know it.

I have more respect for people who acknowledge this tendancy in all people, and make the effort to overcome it.
And I'm quite surprised you (or anyone) would see an acknowledgement like that as a sign of something negative.
I see it as a sign of mature honesty, and refreshing.

Comment Re: Smart move (Score 1) 168

As for Documentation, it is the key to eliminating confusion and miscommunication.

I'm one of those people who prefers to converse in person and will tend to ignore requests to "follow up" by email.

I've found sometimes it's the "follow up" people who are backstabbers. They will do such things are talk with you at length about an issue, and then post to everyone the same question in such a way as to imply you never had the conversation, making everyone else think you're not willing to share information, just so they can force you to do it all over again, on their terms.

Is it a few minutes to summarise? No of course not, it's half a day of writing to meet their standards.

Is Documentation the key to eliminating confusion? Well good documentation is!

Misleading documentation, as every programmer who has wasted their time believing documentation and comments instead of code knows, is worse than no documentation.

But we were talking about email. It's the lack of structure while using it as a "but you said X in that thread 1,123 emails ago" stick that I find difficult.

Where I work, a lot of things are doing by email. So much of importance is written in emails,m yet *nobody can find things or keep track of things because there's so much email it's impossible for anyone to remember*. Even the most pro-email, pro-documentation and pro-structure people (which I respect) tell me they don't keep up with it, while simultaneously being advocates for it. That's not good documentation and in that scenario, those email trails seem to be more of a tool for ensuring that little productive work is really possible.

Comment Re:I guess I'm an outlier (Score 1) 167

Some of my apps are over 50k lines of code!

That stuck out for me. Depending on what you include in those 50kloc, that may be a relatively small project, compared with the ones being discussed in this article.

In my experience, those projects where new things are constantly going wrong in production are those with a large number of slightly flaky and somewhat complex dependencies, 3rd party packages, black box libraries, other products/components they have to work with, that themselves need to be configured/built/patched etc and themselves suffer from production problems, and nothing ever works quite as anyone expects. Counting the full size of the dependencies causing fragility would take it to Mloc scale.

At 50kloc scale, especially if that's all your own code, that's within reach for one person to understand enough of the project at a time to keep all the parts in good working order.

Or you might be talking about 50kloc projects with Mloc-scale dependencies that works out pretty well, in which case I salute you :)

Comment Does this mean small laptops can now update at all (Score 1) 110

I have a couple of smaller, cheaper laptops with Windows 10 on that keep nagging to apply a pending update.
They are only a few months old.
But telling them to proceed just results in them downloading about 5 gigs data, and then giving up because they don't have room on their small SSDs.
This has happened several times, and is a pretty big waste of bandwidth.
We have put hardly any non-OS data on them. They just can't handle the updates, out of the box.

Does this chance mean they might be able to finally update?

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