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Comment Re:The IT shortage in america is a myth. (Score 1) 660

For what it's worth, Missouri has a relatively vibrant tech community in Kansas City, St. Louis, and Springfield.

That said, yeah... Austin isn't non-techie. Even greater Texas has a long history of being technical - ever hear of a little company called Texas Instruments?

Comment Re:Not Sure How I feel about this (Score 1) 115

I could easily argue that the Internet was just an epic feat in creating a time waster.

I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss World of Warcraft when considering software that added value to the world. For players, there are certainly social benefits to playing, as well as improvements in cooperation, fine motor skills, and tactical and strategic thinking. The game also encourages socialization outside your geographical region, and often outside your cultural boundaries.

From a scientific point of view, the Corrupted Blood incident has been studied by epidemiologists in an attempt to better understand and diagnose the causes and spread of disease. It has also been studied as an example of how terrorists might operate during a biological attack. The psychology of different player types would make a fascinating study, as well as studying the effects of anonymity on behavior. And from an economic point of view, you could test nearly anything you wanted by looking at different kinds of realms.

The truth is, many of us are a bit too quick to dismiss games as "something for kids" or "time-wasters." It's certainly true in some cases, but video games in particular started incorporating aspects of literature, philosophy, and culture long ago. If you want a deeper understanding of history, give Europa Universalis or the Age of Empires games a shot. Games like This War of Mine and Spec Ops: The Line will give you a much greater appreciation for the horrors of war, and even PTSD. Ask any player of Katawa Shoujo, Life is Strange, or To The Moon if those games have had an impact on their outlook on life. Ask a Dark Souls player what it has to teach about persistence in the face of adversity.

I would encourage anyone at all to check out the Extra Credits channel on Youtube. In particular, have a look at some of their videos that approach video games from a cultural, artistic, educational, or personally impactful point of view. The "Because Games Matter" series is very good (and recent).

Comment Re:The problem is see is in private space (Score 2) 318

Once upon a time, you were able to ask guests to observe certain behavior while in your home. Please take off your shoes, leave your handgun in the car, don't bring recreational drugs into my home... I really don't see what the difference is in asking a guest to not record or even to leave their Google Glasses at home or in the car.

Comment Re:Faster notebook drives. (Score 1) 261

Footprint would be a huge issue in my case, and I don't think it's all that special. Last I checked, you can get a terabyte 2.5 inch 'conventional' notebook drive for under a hundred dollars. That should be plenty of space for a DVR - the point of which is to catch up on missed episodes, not long-term storage of mass quantities of video. Having limited physical space shouldn't constrain me to have limited digital space too! (Hurray apartment dwelling.)

Comment Re:Remove More Barriers To Entry (Score 1) 474

Installing packages for another distro is not hard for me. And I don't care to install Ubuntu.

The problem seems to be Steam's insistance on glibc_2.15. My Mageia2 system only provides glibc_2.14; I need to wait for Mageia 3 for a distro-supported glibc_2.15.

What miracle has 2.15 wrought that makes it essential for Steam? I suspect that it does nothing special and since steam is not FOSS, I can't recompile it to find out. But that would be OK if Steam would give me a way around this.

Perhaps you should try a more modern distro, like Slackware.

But seriously, why should Valve build against a glibc that was released a year and a half ago?

Comment Re:Where's the Beef? (Score 1) 168

The main interesting draw of this for me was its inherent upgradeability. Yes, $500 will buy me a PC that will run most games... today. What about two years out? What about four years out? Five? If OnLive had been handling that on their side, that could have been a very, very interesting proposal if I could keep that $500 pc for five or ten years without missing out on the latest games.

Comment You can't even trust Facebook the company... (Score 2) 454

Given the utterly dismal record of Facebook the company when it comes to the privacy of its users, I wouldn't bother allowing access. Not only do you have your users to worry about, you have external Facebook users and Facebook itself - that sounds like a recipe for disaster to me. Aren't we due for a reset of our privacy settings to 'Everything shared with everyone' any day now?

Comment Re:Debian (Score 1) 252

July 16, 1993: Patrick Volkerding releases Slackware 1.00. 16 August, 1993: Ian Murdock announces that he wants to create a distro called Debian. No code is forthcoming. 15 September, 1993: Debian 0.01 ALPHA is 'released'. 17 October, 1993: Debian 0.02 ALPHA is 'released'. 02 November, 1993: Debian 0.03 ALPHA is 'released'. 05 November, 1993: Slackware 1.1.0 is released. 07 November, 1993: Debian 0.04 ALPHA is 'released'. 23 November, 1993: Debian 0.80 BETA is 'released' (limited beta). 28 November, 1993: Debian 0.81 BETA is 'released' (limited beta). 26 January, 1994: Debian 0.90 BETA is 'released' (public beta). 29 January, 1994: Debian 0.91 BETA is 'released' (public beta). I keep hearing this 'only by a matter of weeks' line. It looks to me like the first public 'release' of Debian occurred in January of 1994, six months after the first release of Slackware. Or does anyone want to argue that Duke Nukem Forever came out in 1997? Note that I'm giving Debian the benefit of the doubt here, by calling a 'public beta' a 'public release'.

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