Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Take away the academy, weapons qualification, e (Score 1) 103

Would that matter?

I'm surprised they can find anyone who would claim to be a Hacker to work with them.

Low pay.
Poor track record sticking to the letter of the law, let alone the spirit of the law.
Do illegal things and hide them behind national security.

To me it is no different than the scientists that won't work on weapons technology for the military.

We can't trust them to use that kind of power responsibly at any level (local, state, or federal law enforcement).
The proper checks and balances are just not there.

Comment Re:Benefit to end users? (Score 1) 688

No it isn't. If it was, then people would stick to discussing the code and personal insults would not be there. Telling someone they're "deepthroating microsoft" is not a comment on the quality of the code and it's not about merit or lack thereof. It's a personal attack.

Actually I would say that is calling bullshit on hidden agendas. From my reading of the situation Linus found it as offensive as when I see the RIAA/MPAA writing legislation for legislators who submit it as their own.

Now if the discussion had gone into his parentage and how many farm animals were involved that would be personal.

See how there's nothing in there about being very thick skinned? To be a long term Linux contributor you have to have merit and be very thick skinned. We know this because people with sufficient merit get fed up with the system and leave.

There is nothing there about having to coddle to the thin skinned either. Or a duty to be non offensive in the so many ways people get offended these days.

All the snide comments in the world won't make you correct.

You may consider it a snide comment but it's the truth. Why haven't all of these people with sufficient merit put their weight behind a fork of the kernel?
There is nothing stopping a fork from being successful other than a lack of people with sufficient merit backing it.

Comment Re:Benefit to end users? (Score 1) 688

The two are completely orthogonal.

LKML is only about the merits of the code you submit.. They don't care if your white, black, male, female, lesbian, bi, gay, transgendered, etc. This includes not caring if your the nicest person in the world, or an asshole.

If you want to build your own meritocracy that wants high coding standards as well as politically correct sanitized language in all discussions feel free.
There is nothing standing in the way of creating your vision of Open Source Utopia.

Comment Re:Benefit to end users? (Score 1) 688

Part of the LKML meritocracy is the ability to deal with assholes criticizing you. It doesn't make it less of a meritocracy. However it sounds like it is a meritocracy you don't want to deal with.

In the real world there are assholes that stand in your way and you have to find a way to deal with them.

Creating a walled garden and not letting the assholes in is one way to deal with it. And perhaps that is what this fork will create. Time will tell.

Comment Re:Benefit to end users? (Score 1) 688

Yes two have fallen, others will take their place.

If your going to contribute at such a highly visible level as the LKML you better be able to defend your design decisions and code. If harsh criticism will damage your fragile ego then you shouldn't be there.

Don't worry there are plenty of smart people out there that can and will defend their design decisions and code through the harsh criticism.

Comment Re:It's not arrogant, it's correct. (Score 1) 466

Okay let's say it is a road.

Netflix paid company A to move X trucks across the road.
Consumers paid company B to receive Y trucks to their house.

It is between company A and B to sort out what they will pay between each other.
If the cost is too high for company A they are free to pass the increased cost onto Netflix.

Just like NetFlix is free to go to company C to get a better deal.

To put this into a more concrete absurdity.. Let's say you have a gated community with an HOA. Guard shack, the whole works.
The HOA could pass a rule that in order for any packages from Amazon to be delivered Amazon must pay $10 per package to the HOA.
It is their road they are using. They can't get it unless they go by the guardshack, etc.
Just as absurd as Netflix paying the consumers ISP to get their internet traffic delivered.

Comment Re:I... don't understand this at all. (Score 2) 125

Unfortunately this isn't a huge shock to me. Back in the 90's I remember trying to hook up a fortune 500 company to the internet. They were using public IPs on their internal network.. They complained when I told them they had to readdress their network.. I even dug up the various RFCs, who owned the public blocks they were using, etc.

There was actually a discussion along the lines of will we ever need to communicate with those companies? i.e. can we just ignore the problem.. In the end the argument that those places using public IPs wouldn't be able to communicate properly with the reset of the network got things going in the right direction..

Comment Shortage appears real to me. (Score 1) 617

I know where I work we have quite a few open heads for competent C++ or Java devs.

However most fail at the interview stage.. They can't describe data structures they claim to know.. They can't implement some pretty basic problems in a working manner.. They can't decompose a problem into a workable design.

It's fairly rare that we get older people on the interviews.. But the few I have interviewed they tended to fall short in data structures or coding.. They could usually decompose the problem into a workable design.

My guess is that older workers end up in psuedo manager positions.. They design and tell all the underlings what to do.. They spend so much time designing and answering questions from above and below that their dev skills get rusty. When they find themselves looking they don't brush up those rusty skills.. And of course no one ever tells you why they are saying no after the interview.

-Jerry
PS: If you looking for a job Amazon in Seattle is definitely hiring :)

Comment Re:Kudos (Score 1) 1061

I don't think anyone in the Patriot Guard Riders would object to widening the scope to include kids funerals the WBC protest.

I know I have to agree with the general sentiment.. There are some lines you just don't cross. Picketing a 6yo's funeral is a few hundred miles beyond that line.

Comment Re:Google Police (Score 1) 200

Try RTFA:
>Not this phone. It sat by the cash register unclaimed all the next day. “I don’t know anything about this stuff, but I know enough to know this phone was different.”

So the phone sat in the bar for a day and then they tried to figure out who owned it. Sounds pretty reasonable to me.

Comment Re:Developers shouldn't have production access (Score 1) 288

We do own the contents of deployment but not the mechanics of deployment. That means we setup software into packages the deployment system can consume. We identify what set of packages goes into an environment. We choose which environments go on which hosts. The actual deployment is kicked off via a web UI.
The merchanics of the deployment then worry about copying the data over and running the deployment scripts.

If something goes wrong with the automated system it is someone elses problem. However if something goes wrong with the scripts in the package we are deploying it is the devs problem.

Comment Re:Developers shouldn't have production access (Score 3, Insightful) 288

I've been in companies that practiced it both ways.

Company A) Developers can never ever access production no matter the reason. The end result in that situation was bugs that couldn't be reproduced on the desktop or in the QA environment. The problems went on for months until I had a lucky break of a developer moving jobs into the system admin role of the production environment. When he looked things over he discovered the previous admin had not configured things in production properly. To the point of lying about it when I had sent a previous check list of things to verify. If I had access to the systems the problem would have been resolved in a few days rather than months.

Company B) Developers own the software and hardware from end to end. In my current company we have to package the software up into a deployment system and deploy it that way. However we do have full access to all the systems. Can/do we do hacks and quick fixes? Yes, if the situation warrants it. But in the end it has to get rolled into the official distribution for it to be correct. Can it be abused? Yes. But that is why the culture of the company become very important. In the end you either trust your developers to do the right thing or you don't. If the company can't trust the developers to have ownership of their code and systems.. Well then at least for me I would say I'm working at the wrong company.

FYI, I enjoy working at company B far more than I ever did at company A. Given a choice I will never go back to an environment where developers don't have access to production.

Comment Re:Everyone ignores Commodore (Score 1) 301

On the C64 you had to move the ROM out of the way to get to the RAM underneath. I don't remember the exact details but you could either see the RAM or the ROM and it was controllable.

If you want to get into memory expanders the C64 had at least a 512K ram expander available. I remember having one and it worked with GEOS at least.. might have been used as a form of ram drive to speed up games as well.

The drive drive was a computer in itself that you could buy ram expanders for and run programs on. Typically used for increasing load speed or duplicating copy protected disks.

Slashdot Top Deals

Before Xerox, five carbons were the maximum extension of anybody's ego.

Working...