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Comment Re:Sir Winston (Score 1) 621

The UK exports 40% TO the EU.
If they want to keep doing that, they will follow EU regulations, and will allow freedom of movement.
They are of course free not to do so, as long as they accept that they lose that 40%

The EU has said several times now that that is not going to change. And they cannot step back from that even if they wanted to, because then the EU would put leaving EU countries ahead of the ones that stay. And that's not a long term winning strategy.

Comment Re:What could possibly go wrong? (Score 1) 127

How about: paedophiles who rape little children, or people who beat babies to death with indifference just receive a couple years in prison and then can go along their merry way to repeat themselves. When I see how low those sentences sometimes are, it makes me angry.

Imo. whoever rapes or kills a kid should go to prison for the rest of their natural life without parole. Or if they get out, be actively monitored for life. But apparently it is much more important to consider their feelings and give them second, third or fourth chances than to protect more kids against the staggering recidivism rate of paedophiles which varies from study to study, but over the lifetime of a convicted paedophile are reported typically from 40 to 60%, with the more extreme and aggressive ones more likely to relapse.

I also fail to see how first time offenses should be treated differently. That's like saying that first time someone rapes a kid he should get off lightly so that next time he can be tried for real. First offense should be the last one as well, by virtue of not being able to repeat it. I do believe in second chances for many things, but 'not' being a murderer or child molester are not among them.

Comment Re: Lots of unwarranted concerns (Score 2) 319

Speaking as a Belgian, living in Belgium since I was born, I'd say he is right. We have 5 different governments that partially overlap, we have 3 official languages, and the 2 major language groups can't stand each other. I think Belgium is a great place to live, but that doesn't mean I can't also acknowledge that our political system is pretty dysfunctional and nothing sensible gets done unless it is an emergency.

Comment Re:If you do go with C++ (Score 5, Interesting) 296

I think that really depends on your definition of "best". I've used Qt (and still use it sometimes) and initially I thought I liked it, but over time began disliking it a lot. For one, I've seen the signal/slot mechanism used to create really hard to understand code. I've seen memory allocated via new and then the pointer passed into emit only to be deleted on the other end of a signal/slot chain.

Posted says, "needs to manage memory usage and disk access at a very granular level and a desire to be cross-platform". Stdio/stdlib takes care of that. I don't see any mention of GUI, so if GUI is necessary, then I'd say, ya, just use Qt, because it probably is the best and it does come with a lot of other stuff, so you when in Rome...

Boost. What you'll get from boost is the filesystem stuff. It'll be similar in functionality as System.IO.FileInfo System.IO.Directory in .NET, but way more confusing to use. At least at first.

It's funny, the filesystem api was proposed over 9 years ago for c++.

http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/s...

Comment Re: Buggy whip makers said automobiles aren't... (Score 1) 451

I think the issue is more about whether people will trust a machine to make qualitative decisions on their behalf. I don't think I would. For starters, we've demonstrated time and again they were incapable of making reliable computer systems, and nevermind secure from tampering. Who can ensure me that the guidance system isn't going to core dump at high speed and slam on the brakes or worse? Secondly, how do test this system? There seems to be way too many scenarios where the best answer is subjective. You'd have to trust a computer system to evaluate risk where human life is at stake. I think the systems that Mercedes is building is much better. It seems to me they're heading towards a more augmented reality with feedback that can suggest a good choice, but allow me to make the final decision. If you're not familiar, they do the beak pedal tap and steering jar thing. That's at least a system I can trust. Then there's the whole liability thing. Does a self driving car come with the "this shit probably doesn't work" license like all other software? And lastly, the cost. What's the expected cost of a self driving car that's sure to be worthless on the used car market? I'd say in 10 years you'll still be buying vehicles that you command, and the more advanced stuff found in higher end cars will be had in lower cost vehicles.

Comment No, not really... (Score 4, Interesting) 245

I work for a company that makes Orphan drugs. Yes, they're ridiculously expensive. The reason is that the number of patients for our drugs number in the couple of thousands globally. Our workforce to run the entire plant, do QA, maintenance, regulatory administration and production processes etc numbers in the several hundreds. Those people need to be paid every month by what a couple thousand people pay for their meds every month.

And that is without taking into account that this entire plant was built for making this drug, which was an investment of hundreds of millions of dollars, with several millions annually for upkeep and maintenance.

I agree that we probably make a decent profit or we wouldn't be doing it.
However, if subsidizing we to stop, we'd just stop making it because with the numbers I mentioned above, it is impossible to make our drugs in a manner that would be affordable without it. And that would mean those people would simply die.

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