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Comment Re:Pardon Manning and Snowden (Score 1) 384

Very simply solution to this Bradley v. Chelsea debate. Until courts martial sentence is completed, and Manning is discharged, Manning's proper name is either Private Manning, or just plain, Manning. When Manning completes sentence, and dishonorable discharge is duly executed, then somebody who gives a rodent's rectum can quibble about what to call the civilian formerly known as Private Manning.

Comment Re:Why should anyone trust the report? (Score 4, Informative) 404

The report in no was alleges "foreign influence." It simply describe a cyber intrusion of Democratic Party assets and individuals in technical detail, ascribes the techniques and tools used in the intrusion to entities believed to be (or affiliated with) the Russians, and recommends sensible, albeit completely standard, countermeasures to similar future such attacks. The report in no way addresses, suggests, or concludes how any information gained in the attack was used to “interfere” with the recent election. Critically, there report does not ascribe any of the damaging Wikileak documents, which were the documents that most appear to have had a damaging effect on Clinton, to the attacks that were subject of the report. The report is what it is. It isn't what it isn't, a report addressing election "interference."

Comment Re:Retaliatory measures based on no evidence. (Score 1) 821

I’ve read the publicly released US-CERT report. What it does is describe a cyber intrusion of Democratic Party assets and individuals in technical detail, ascribe the techniques and tools used in the intrusion to entities believed to be (or affiliated with) the Russians, and recommend sensible, albeit standard, countermeasures to avoid, detect and mitigate similar future such attacks. What the report does not do in any way, although certain news organizations and officials appear to imply that it does, is detail how any information thus gained in the attack was used to “interfere” with the recent election. It does not, for example, ascribe any of the damaging Wikileak documents, which were the documents that most appear to have had a damaging effect on the losing candidate, to the attacks that were subject of the report. By the way, numerous open sources have been reporting that the Russians, PRC, DPRK, and even certain allies, have bee “hacking” U.S. Government, Commercial, public and private institutions for many years. Welcome to the occasionally alarming State of Awareness.

Comment Re:Classifed? Well, there's your problem (Score 4, Insightful) 110

Why not a moratorium on laws? Require a current law to drop for every new law passed? I'm only half joking here. Seriously, how long can we go on passing new laws every day of every year until every human activity is either against the law, or mandated by law? Freedom loses all meaning. We're essentially approaching an era of legal "whitelist" tyranny; all actions implicitly denied except those mandated. Then, just in order to live our lives we'll always be in violation of some laws, and "the law" will have no meaning beyond a pretext for enforcing political control.

Comment Re:End of Great Britain? (Score 1) 1592

It is not xenophobia to desire to control one's borders. The U.S. has extensive legal immigration, where known people make a legal commitment to integrate into our society and obey our laws. What many seek to control is illegal immigration, where unknown people seek to live apart from our laws, are free to commit crimes, simply change location and identity when arrested and released on bail, or commit crimes and slip back across the border only to return when the heat dissipates. Also, it is not xenophobia to welcome people who commit to integrate as member of our society while not welcoming those who wish to enter out country and remain apart while work against our customs, traditions and mores. So, as you would likely not welcome foreigners making uninformed judgments about your country, I will refrain from making uninformed judgments about yours.

Comment Re:plus interest? (Score 1) 180

I stand in support of the haters of COMCAST! Why not? It's just too easy. I mean, who among us that have suffered the atrocious technical and even worse customer service doesn't hate COMCAST? Of course, having moved away from a COMCAST monopoly area into a Verizon FIOS area, I have updated my hate register to include Verizon. The only provider that I never quite grew to hate was DirectTV, but, alas, I callously ditched them with nary a second glance for Verizon when offered what I thought was a better deal at the time to bundle everything. What the hell, everybody sucks. Get off my lawn.

Comment Re: BINGO (Score 1) 268

In Federal Agencies, the IT leads are generally government employees. However, the actual IT work is largely contracted out to industry. Google "IT Service Companies Washington DC area," and, for me it returns, "About 219,000,000 results (0.66 seconds)." This model applies pretty much across the board at the Federal, State and Local level. There are a few exceptions, for example in certain OCONUS enclaves, such as expeditionary/military. Some contractors deliver outstanding service. Some mediocre. A few perform outright incompetently, at least for the time period between re-competition RFP's, excluding those fired outright for gross incompetence. I'm sure there's a distribution curve for IT service competence, like everything else. All humans are flawed. Life becomes harder the more flawed one is in areas that count...like on the job.

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