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Comment Re:Sad but unavoidable (Score 1) 162

Android got where it is by being open.

Typical Slashtard. Outside of this site, almost NO ONE cares that Android is "Open" (which it is actually NOT).

The phone manfacturers do, and for them it's enough that Android is more open than iOS (which it actually IS, for any reasonable definition of open).

Android got to where it is by being on every cheap-ass FREE handset around, PERIOD. FULL STOP.

So, pray tell, what made those cheap-ass handsets possible?

Censorship

Peter Thiel's Lawyer Wants To Silence Reporting On Trump's Hair (gawker.com) 301

An anonymous reader writes: Follow the report that Gawker has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy after facing multiple lawsuits funded by tech billionaire Peter Thiel, it's being reported that Thiel's lawyer, Charles J. Harder, is threatening to sue Gawker for reporting on the company that made Donald Trump's hair, claiming copyright prohibits Gawker from republishing his threat. He sent the company a letter on behalf of Edward Ivari, the owner of the company Gawker suggests may be behind Trump's hair. Gawker said it was sent a six-page letter that claims the story "was 'false and defamatory,' invaded Ivari's privacy, intentionally inflicted emotional distress, and committed 'tortious interference' with Ivari's business relations." Gawker reporter Ashley Feinberg suggested in a lengthy Gawker story that Trump secretly underwent Ivari International's $60,000 "microcylinder intervention" treatment, with the company's offices located on the 25th floor of Trump Tower. Gawker called Ivari's claims "ridiculous," and noted that the statements at issue were pulled from his own publicity materials and from public records of a 2001 lawsuit against the company.

Submission + - Intel Introduces Hardware-Level Exploit Protection (theregister.co.uk)

IAN writes: The Register reports:

Intel is pushing a neat technique that could block malware infections on computers at the processor level.

That's the 40,000ft view of the new safety mechanism, the details of which were published on Thursday. What's really going on is this: Intel's so-called Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET) [PDF] attempts to thwart exploit code that uses return-orientated programming (ROP) and jump-orientated programming (JOP).

CET works by introducing a shadow stack – which only contains return addresses, is held in system RAM, and is protected by the CPU's memory management unit. When a subroutine is called, the return address is stashed on the thread's stack, as per normal, and also in the shadow stack. When the processor reaches a return instruction, the processor ensures the return address on the thread stack matches the address on the shadow stack.


Comment Re: Mobile theme is quirky (Score 1) 166

Yeah, mobile Slashdot is pure shit.

It's good enough for lurking and offhand reading. Yes, layout glitches and general slowness are annoying, page-width ads for inane apps even more so, but it's the same ugliness on all kinds of mobile browsers I've tried.

I voted for responsive but I'm not even sure what that means as I don't follow trends in web development.

Responsive design is not new. Summary: don't make a separate mobile-only site, but style the content so that it adapts itself to various device sizes. Nice if you can pull it off, but requires careful design in order to be both effective and maintainable.

Comment Re:Why would anyone be shocked? (Score 3, Funny) 213

Economists with an ideological bent make things up with no relationship to the real world and people believe them.

It's an old, but relevant, joke:

The First Law of Economics: For every economist, there exists an equal and opposite economist.

The Second Law of Economics: They're both wrong.

Comment Re:Patched on 7/28 (CentOS) (Score 1) 68

FWIW, it seems CentOS 6 was not updated (though there is an SRPM from RHEL for it).

The update is in the CR repo because of the preparations for the release of CentOS 6.7. Short explanation here (with the link to the page explaining how to enable the additional repo), and a couple of longer explanations further down the thread.

Comment Re:The power button (Score 1) 698

The whole point of the Caps Lock key is that you don't have to press it over and over.

Whew, so I'm not the only one... But why is that point lost on the modern crowd? Is nobody a touch typist anymore? I've been taught that capital letters are typed by pressing the Shift key on the opposite side of the key being input, which gets ridiculous if you have to enter a longish string of capitals, e.g., echo $LD_LIBRARY_PATH (and no, I might not be in a shell which lets me autocomplete that one, thanks for asking). So CapsLock is far from useless. Dual Ctrls likewise, by analogy with dual Shifts -- I'd never contort my fingers by typing Ctrl-T or Ctrl-B single-handedly, even if Ctrl were in the usual CapsLock position (which some people obviously prefer.)

Comment Re:IBM PC was an open platform (Score 1) 179

Are you under the mistaken impression that "open" means the source code is also free to re-use and distribute? It does not, contrary to how the FSF would like to redefine "open".

That's a misrepresentation of FSF's stance. They are the ones who grumble about using the term "open source", because they feel it's too loose, for exactly the reasons you have described.

Comment Re:I SURE FUCKING HOPE SO! (Score 1) 36

AIX is UNIX Done Right. It's the kind of UNIX that doesn't fuck around. It just goddamn works, and it works really well.

Unless much has changed with AIX, this quote still applies. I used to coddle some AIX servers in the 4.2-4.3 timeframe, and can vouch for the truthfulness of the quote. AIX is... strange. Though, in fairness, they did have LVM done right.

Comment Re:FEAR! (Score 1) 105

Control the populous with fear! Let's figure out a way to make them even more afraid of nuclear power so we can continue selling snakeoil solutions like solar and wind energy products.

The "populous" (ObGrammarNazi: it's "populace" in this case), as represented by the thieves of those radiation sources, has already demonstrated how informed and afraid it is: not much. How you can equate medical/industrial isotope capsules with nuclear power generation is another question. (Hint: you really can't, but it's so difficult to pass an opportunity for trolling, right?)

Comment Re:Great Firewall of China is bad enough ... (Score 2) 270

Actually, she [Queen E.] is the only one with the power to "enact" legislation. Parliament cannot create laws without her consent. She can therefore refuse to sign any legislation she objects to, and she has on occasion done so (typically tax laws that affect her personal wealth. Yeah.)

Citation badly needed. The procedure you've described is called Royal Assent, and has been a formality for ages; the last time it was withheld was... wait for it... in 1708. Yes, in theory Her Maj could veto a law, but that would be the end of her political meddling, if not the monarchy itself.

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