Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Congratulations,your PC is now a governance device (Score 3, Insightful) 172

The camera "sees" the user and even knows which user it is seeing. The camera then locks the screen immediately when the user is not present.

How long before the computer "sees" the user and notifies the police that they can pick up their known dissident. I mean, really, given the kind of governance we're about to enter into, this (not to mention Alexa-like audio surveillance "features") are the last thing I'd want on any equipment in my home.

And no, I don't have anything to hide. But conversely, I also don't use the restroom in the middle of 5th Avenue. Privacy is a thing, even in a world full of morons who think it isn't.

Comment Re:What's the money for? (Score 1) 134

But they sound like something that costs less than a million dollars per year. Is the rest all spent on embezzlement services?

First, haha NO, servicing hundreds of thousands or millions of customers a day does not cost less than a million a year, try probably ~$50 million if you're doing it right.

Second, they're currently employing most of the former AI and Robotics labs folks from Carnegie Mellon and a few other large high profile labs in an effort to get autonomous cars going to the point where they can remove their biggest expenditure (their drivers).

Comment Re:Strategically important (Score 1) 20

Yes, quite carried away. Your exposition is quite naive in thinking that people think in the scope you think they do. The failure to respond has been repeated historically quite a number of times.

And I think your timing of off by 50+ years, nothing will happen until people are really starving.

Nothing will likely happen until the 0.1% are starving, by which time it will be too late to do anything. The only reason to even hold out what little hope there is, is that people like the grandparent are at least thinking about, and worrying about, these things. If enough do, then real change can happen. Like the outcry that forced the Republicans to back off (at least for now) gutting the House Ethics committee, when the masses do voice their concern, they are heard. Unfortunately we all feel too weak, and too powerless, to make much noise unless things really hit the fan (by which point it is often too late). This is not an accident, and there are very specific reasons we as citizens are constantly made to feel powerless (hint: it benefits those running the show, on whichever side of the aisle).

Comment DRM paradise (Score 1) 229

While this request has DRM implications I really don't like (lense to screen encryption) and is no doubt an MPAA wet-dream, I unfortunately have to support this, as the clear and present danger to journalists, and the potential for regimes like the Trump Administration, Putin, et. al. to distort or destroy evidence of wrongdoing, demand something like this. At least with encryption journalists can keep their data safe, and if done properly, we can detect changes to the raw video/audio data. Both of which will be critical if we don't permanently want to live in a so-called "post-truth" reality (which really means "nothing but lies, lies, and more lies" reality).

Comment The company that rootkitted Windows from audio CDs (Score 4, Insightful) 55

So the company that put Windows rootkits on Redbook audio CDs puts backdoors in other products? Stunning!

The company that sold the PSP 1000 to early adopters at $250+ per unit based on all the things it would be able to do with expansions, then released expansions that only worked with later models doesn't take their customers' needs seriously? Shocking!

The company that advertised Linux on the PlayStation 3 then made it impossible to use Linux if you installed most of the newer PS/3 games stomps on their promises? Inconceivable!

Or... oh, wait... no, that's not it. The surprising part is that anybody trusts these shady jerks at all.

Comment Re:The opposite is true (Score 1) 531

Editorial bias is one thing, blatantly burying a major news story(WikiLeaks) because it doesn't fit the agenda is equal to being "fake news site". Oh sure, they ran a one or two minute piece once, but TRUMP IS A RACIST runs for 38 minutes every night.

There is bias (accidental unintentional) and then there is rigged reporting. Calling it bias is ... cute..

Accurate reporting on the sayings and doings of deplorable people tend to make them seem deplorable. It's not the fault of news outlets, mainstream or otherwise, that the right chose to rally behind a racist demagogue.

Comment Re:Precisely (Score 1) 531

When people decide they're only going to trust news from sources that we know make up stories (and repeat stories from similar sites), how do you prove anything to be a lie?

You can't cure wilful self-deception, but reality will, once the problem gets bad enough. Of course, since we now have nukes it could well be there's nobody left to dig themselves out of the ashes.

Comment Re:bash it! (Score 1) 280

It's understandable. If it's a choice between learning how to use an advanced command line on an operating system designed not to use one, or a new Python programming framework, which do you think most readers here would spend their time on?

Except as I said Windows and the larger MS ecosystem are moving to require Powershell knowledge to be effective. Many, many things simply can't be done through the GUI anymore, in fact that are quite a few that can't be done with any combination of batch, gpo, and GUI, you MUST use Powershell to do them as the management interface layers aren't exposed any other way. Just because it says Windows on the tin doesn't mean it's the same thing as Windows of old, MS is moving slowly but surely to a much more scalable management system (CLI and API's) because their own ambitions to be the hosting provider for the small to midmarket companies has forced them to face the limitations of their legacy model.

Comment Re:bash it! (Score 1) 280

but like 99% of Slashdotters, while I've heard of it, I've never actually used it

If that's even close to true then Slashdot has REALLY gone downhill from the early days. This used to be a place for geeky technical people who were into computers, even if you're not a primarily Windows person I would still expect you've run into them enough to have used Powershell (I'm primarily a Windows guy but I still know bash, tcsh, grep, tar, etc). If your job involves Windows to any degree beyond a groupware client and you don't know Powershell you're at a major disadvantage from this point forward as it's completely the direction that Windows and Microsoft server software is going (heck, they're now designing most of their stuff for o365 first and on-prem second so it's only natural that they want a powerful and robust CLI and API).

Slashdot Top Deals

Money can't buy love, but it improves your bargaining position. -- Christopher Marlowe

Working...