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Comment Re:Simple question (Score 2) 103

I agree. I believe this is why so many teens "go crazy" when they leave home for university. They've spent 17-18 years being sheltered and micro-managed by their parents, and suddenly they're left more-or-less on their own to make important decisions and manage their lives. Making decisions _for_ your kids isn't helping them become well-adjusted adults.

Comment Re:finally, proper use! (Score 1) 54

I'd be interested in how Valve's return policy is going to work with Bitcoin. Will it be based on the value of bitcoin at the time of purchase, or the value of bitcoin at the time of the refund? You can sit on a game for up to 14 days and get a refund for it, as long as you don't play it for over 2 hours during that time. Cryptocurrencies have fluctuated great deals in that period of time before. If they decide to refund the Bitcoin amount of the purchase, then people could use this as a short-term investment scam. Buy some games if you think the price of Bitcoin will jump in the next two weeks, get refunded for more valuable Bitcoins than you spent.

Comment Re:finally, proper use! (Score 1) 54

Yeah this AC seems to either hate Steam, cryptocurrency, or both.

Maybe this will turn out to do nothing for Valve's bottom line, but I feel relatively safe making the assumption that Valve had some amount of data which would suggest this can increase sales. Or, maybe some people at Valve are just fans of cryptocurrency and had enough clout to get Steam to support it. Either way, it means nothing to me since I neither use cryptocurrency nor intend to do so in the foreseeable future. All of this leads to me giving exactly zero fucks about this development, and I can't fathom why AC is so angry about it.

Comment Re:Why ask the Government? (Score 1) 125

I would be less surprised to see the opposite effect.

From my own experience, people will use proprietary software even when an adequate, or even better, free software alternative exists, simply because they don't know enough or don't care enough about technology to be aware of the difference. Proprietary software comes with massive marketing, which is what makes people aware of those products. It wasn't until I started to learn how to program that I was even introduced to the concept of open source or free software, because suddenly I was exposed to communities and ideas that were previously unknown to me.

I don't think public education will start churning out many good programmers who would otherwise have never started programming, but it might expose enough young people to the ideas of how software is created that more people will learn about free software and why it's important.

Comment Re:Why ask the Government? (Score 1) 125

Meh, I'm not worried. All of the information, tutorials, examples, etc., that you could possibly want to help you learn how to program is already easily available for free on the internet. I wouldn't bet on the public school system being able to magically generate millions of good software developers when even top universities haven't been able to figure out how to make successful programmers. To do anything more interesting than the plainest of web or app development still requires a significant time investment to learn languages, platforms, computer architecture, etc. The biggest impact I could see this having is fewer "menial" software jobs being outsourced.

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