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Comment Re:Mostly thanks to H1Bs (Score 2) 118

Data like the shitload of news stories about how Disney laid off workers and required them to train their H1B replacements or lose their severance pay?

There have been any number of stories that follow the same pattern. It's very easy to find them if you actually look.

The regulations meant to stop companies from replacing workers with H1B workers simply caused the companies to outsource the work to companies that, coincidentally, are staffed almost exclusively with H1B workers.

Comment Re:And what IS "Magic Leap"? (Score 0) 62

The second sentence in the first link from the summary says "Here is the first public photo of a working prototype of Magic Leapâ(TM)s portable augmented reality device."

It's not the author's fault that you skimmed the first article and went click happy until you were "5 links deep in" before you slowed down enough to actually read what was in front of you.

Comment Re:What are the known risks (Score 1) 122

Of course not. From TFA:
"These are long-chain PFASs that have largely been phased out, in favor of shorter-chain compounds that are thought to have shorter half-lives in the human body, but these shortened forms have not yet been thoroughly studied."

Maybe the shorter chain compounds have similar effects and maybe they leave the body faster. Or maybe not. We don't know.

The logical thing would be to demand a study of the compounds that are in use, but good luck getting that with budgets being cut and information being locked down under the current administration.

Comment Re:I think it's safe to say that wouldn't hold up (Score 5, Informative) 216

Your argument wouldn't work because the heart rate data had already been sent to a third party. Since the information was already given to a third party and the third party is the subject of the warrant, it's no longer a case of the defendant being compelled to do anything.

The best argument against the use of the heart monitor data would actually be the HIPAA privacy rule.

Comment Re:I think it's safe to say that wouldn't hold up (Score 5, Informative) 216

You should have read the article rather than the click-bait headline.

They found gasoline on his clothing, the fire starting in multiple places in his house and the guy claimed to have packed up suitcases of his belongings and tossed them out of the house during the fire (while somehow not having time to bother rescuing his cat). The pacemaker data was not the primary evidence used to indict him.

Comment Re:Correct link (Score 1) 75

And 16 hours later the editors still haven't bothered to fix the link.

In any other line of work resubmitting old articles as new, submitting error-filled work that you obviously never proofread, not fixing mistakes and committing all the other errors that /. editors make would get you fired within the first few days. Fortunately for the editors here, the standards for online publishing are so low that they would literally have to be illiterate toddlers to not be qualified for their positions.

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"There is no statute of limitations on stupidity." -- Randomly produced by a computer program called Markov3.

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