Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Microsoft ends Tuesday patches (

An anonymous reader writes: Yesterday was a big day for Patch Tuesday. It was the last traditional Windows Patch Tuesday as Microsoft is moving to a new patching release model. In the future, patches will be bundled together and users will no longer be able to pick and choose which updates to install. Furthermore, these new ‘monthly update packs’ will be combined, so for instance, the November update will include all the patches from October as well.

Submission + - SPAM: On-Chip Network Designs

Radha Shelke writes: NetSpeed Systems has built an on chip network design. An architecture which is a set of tools designed to synthesise the best type of network for a given SoC, one that would be free of deadlocks and balance power with performance.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Malware Counts Word Docs to Evade Detection ( 2

msm1267 writes: A new macro-based malware has been spotted that goes to novel lengths to avoid detection. Once a computer is compromised, the malware will count the number of Word documents stored on the local drive; if it's more than two, the malware executes. Otherwise, it figures it's landed in a virtual environment or is executing in a sandbox and stays dormant.

A typical test environment consists of a fresh Windows computer image loaded into a VM. The OS image usually lacks documents and other telltale signs of real world use.

If no Microsoft Word documents are found, the VBA macro's code execution terminates, shielding the malware from automated analysis and detection. Alternately, if more than two Word documents are found on the targeted system, the macro will download and install the malware payload.

Submission + - Cisco Blames Router Bug On 'Cosmic Radiation' (

netbuzz writes: A Cisco bug report addressing “partial data traffic loss” on the company’s ASR 9000 Series routers contends that a “possible trigger is cosmic radiation causing SEU soft errors.” Not everyone is buying: “It IS possible for bits to be flipped in memory by stray background radiation. However it's mostly impossible to detect the reason as to WHERE or WHEN this happens,” writes a Redditor identifying himself as a former Cisco engineer. As for Cisco, the company says it can’t confirm this particular instance of cosmic meddling, but contends that it is certainly possible and is a problem they’ve been working on since 2001.

Comment Re: Wrong. Those are not democracies. (Score 1) 702

Uh, are you perchance confusing Athens with Rome, or Platonic reality with actual reality? I concede that there might be other explanations for your mistake, but it’s hard to take seriously. E.g., to quote from the most easily-accessible source on what shouldn’t be a controversial point, the introduction to the Wikipedia article on, of all things, Athenian democracy:
It was a system of direct democracy, in which participating citizens voted directly on legislation and executive bills. Participation was not open to all residents: to vote one had to be an adult, male citizen who owned land and was not a slave

Comment Re:All awful but the bias is interesting (Score 1) 385

> an apparently right-wing bent, such as the situation at Wheaton College

The article you cite says that the dispute isn’t political but theological, about a disagreement in doctrine between the avowedly religious college and a public theological claim by the professor. (I will emphatically stay out of the details of the theology.) FIRE may well get some support from those on the political right, but the author of the original article (the head of the organization) “has described himself as a "pro-choice liberal"” per Wikipedia.

Submission + - The real cost of mobile ads (

cvdwl writes: A New York Times (mildly paywalled) article and associated analysis discuss the consumer cost of mobile ads assuming a US$0.01/MB data plan. The article provides one of the only estimates I've seen of the the real cost in time and money (and time is money) of mobile advertising. Ethics of ad-blockers aside, this highlights the hidden costs of data-heavy (often lazy and poorly developed) web-design.

In a nutshell, the worst sites took 10-30s load 10-20MB, costing $0.15-0.40, over 4G due to a blizzard of video, heavy images, and occasionally just massive scripts. The best sites had high content to ad ratios, typically loading 1-3MB of content and >500kB of advertising.

Comment Over-hyped (Score 5, Informative) 623

The summary is over-hyping this story, which is a day or two old, and not given anything like this much play in the mainstream media. The link to Forbes is actually just to a third-party renting space on the Forbes site, and the New Republic piece is opinion, not news coverage. Not that I am in any way denying or condoning Putin’s invasion, but overreacting doesn’t help.

Slashdot Top Deals

An inclined plane is a slope up. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"