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Comment Re:Artificial language limits (Score 1) 369

Any language that could replace C and assembler would need to be statically compiled. So for Java, C#, Python and so on you'd have to define a subset that does not require a runtime parser or standard library. And you'd need extensions (or a static module system) that allows you to add assembler for direct hardware access. And a new compiler that can generate static code instead of the intermediate VM they target now. Not impossible by any means and probably a fairly interesting exercise too, but the languages would end up rather different and more restricted than the full versions people are used to.

Rather, I expect and hope that something like Rust will eventually supplant these languages in this space. Rust gives you the best of both worlds, with a statically compiled binaries and good memory safety at compile time, rather than runtime. You pay for it by having to be much more explicit about ownership than in these languages though. I've followed that project for a good while and it's clear that targeting small embedded systems is a struggle even for such a language; Java and friends would be much more difficult still.

Comment Re:Artificial language limits (Score 1) 369

FORTH is the rare language that tends to be even more memory efficient than C. The runtime interpreter is truly minimal (really just following a bunch of jump tables); you can have a small environment and application code in less than 8K.

On the other hand - and I say this as someone who likes FORTH a lot - you'd be hard pressed to find people claiming that FORTH is any higher-level (or easier to develop in) than C or assembler.

On the third hand - and off-topic here - it's quite a fun little language to use. Just like you can say that Scheme is programming directly in an AST, using FORTH is writing code directly for a stack machine. It's probably good for you to have a bit of experience even if you never do anything "real" with it.

Comment Re:More Sleight of Hand... (Score 2) 17

You are of course welcome to use whatever you want, as long as you comply with the license. In the case of ProxySQL, that's the GPL. Percona appears to be one person, one René Cannaò, and it looks like he's interested in selling his consulting services. If you are actually making money from using his product, please consider throwing some work his way.

Like I said, Open Source developers should not have to wear hair shirts while their users, sometimes the most profitable companies on Wall Street, rake in the dough.

Bruce

Submission + - MariaDB Fixes Business Source License, Releases MaxScale 2.1 (perens.com)

Bruce Perens writes: MariaDB is releasing MaxScale 2.1, a new version of their database routing proxy, and has modified its timed-transition-to-Open-Source Business Source License to make it more acceptable to the Open Source community and more easily usable by other companies. I've blogged the issues I had with the license and how MariaDB has fixed them, and Kaj Arno has blogged the MariaDB side of the story.

Comment Re:They said the same about mobile (Score 3, Informative) 369

The high-level VMs and the drivers to drive the specific hardware isn't developed by magical Low-Level Elves in Happy Rainbow Fairly Land. Every IoT device is going to have their oen special hardware stuff, and somebody needs to write the low-level code to interface with it. That is done in a combination of C and assembler.

Also, at volume the price difference between a MCU that can run a VM and one that can not will be on the order of tens of cents (either currency). If you plan to make on the order of a million devices, then 20 cents per unit will more than pay for a programmer that knows to use the small MCU over a Java hack that does not.

Comment This case doesn't have legs (Score 1) 640

What a horrible thing it is for these two people to die. The lady's father, however, does not have a case. It's only going to be necessary to show the degree to which the lady was intoxicated, and no judge or jury is going to be swayed by allegations that the cause of death is at all related to the power of the car relative to other cars.

Comment Re:That's a lot of wasted water (Score 1) 455

You may not believe it's a desert due to irrigation.

The central valley survives on water inputs from outside and can't sustain itself on the available water. That's a desert. Much of the land has subsided by 10 feet or more as ground water has been drawn out, and municipalities are commonly drilling 1000-foot-deep wells to have a hope of their being reliable.

Comment Re:Political fallout (Score 1) 455

I think the emergency spillway was one of those things that is required, and that nobody associated with building the dam expected that it would ever actually have to be used. You don't design something meant to be used that hydromines an entire hillside the first time you use it.

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