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Comment Re:Heat? (Score 2) 102

Isn't AZ too hot? Do you really want a data center where the temperature quite often approaches 110 degrees?

Las Vegas isn't much cooler than Phoenix (maybe 10 degrees most of the time), yet Switch is doing booming business here with datacenters popping up all over town. The temperature outside hasn't been much of an impediment for them.

Comment Re: Who cares? (Score 1) 502

because its a giant scam you imbecile.

Duh? That's why everyone wants something done about it. Externalizing pollution to get an easy subsidy isn't merely a scam, it's an old and obvious scam.

The trouble is, everyone does it. If I tell you to stop scamming everyone, then you'll tell me to stop scamming everyone. It's all well and fine for me to try to stop paying for your subsidy, but you better keep on paying mine!

Comment Re:I still don't get it. (Score 1) 128

How was it NOT extortion before the law?

I haven't found the text of the law to read, but I can guess.

I used to work for a place where, in the late 1980s and early 1990s we would occasionally sell ransomware to clients who had iffy credit. Pay your bill every month, and we'd send you an update to our software. Stop paying or don't install your update, and a time bomb would go off: it fails to start. The software's data wasn't encrypted or anything, but it was in a proprietary undocumented form, so it was effectively unusable. (Unless you set back your machine's clock, which would have some annoying consequences for data entry speed.)

I think what we were doing would probably be considered ransomware to most people.

The reason I wouldn't call that extortion, is that the client would agree to it beforehand (and without any coercion or duress) and they would get something of value (our software) in exchange that they previously didn't have. Don't wanna do it? Don't sign the license agreement. (Yes, back in those days, a license was actually a real contract, and customers would sign it and we'd put it in a filing cabinet. No after-the-fact "surprise! you didn't really buy this in spite of having thought so at the time you parted with your money!")

I think what we were doing would probably not be considered extortion to most people. (But I'm still glad I don't do that anymore.)

Comment Re:liability, permits, hazmat, max hours on duty, (Score 2) 97

At many truck stops youll see a kiosk for OO's (owner-operators) to browse available jobs.

And remember, if you don't like what you find in the mission computer, you can always go to the bar. At the bar, there's oftentimes someone hanging around waiting to offer a job to anyone who walks in. Maybe they'll hit you up to move some shadier cargo/contraband, or they'll offer pirate bounties, or they might even try to recruit you from freight missions to doing combat missions for the military!

For the latter, make sure you have upgraded all your truck's weapons and gotten your combat rating and legal status up. Also, get expanded fuel tanks. Invariably there will be some deep strike mission far from any good place to refuel. So you'll either have to have big tanks, or you'll have to hunt enemy truckers to take their fuel to get you back home.

Comment Re:Huh? (Score 1) 63

The whole point of NSLs is that there is no prior judicial oversight; there's no court to defy. I'm not saying they wouldn't be punished somehow, but it wouldn't be contempt of court. These things exist because there's some law that imposes a prior restraint on the receiver's speech. If it were to end up in court, you'd hear words like "first" and "amendment" long before you hear words like "contempt."

Comment "Sources?" (Score 1) 75

Did this sentence..

Eighty-four percent of Americans with online access through three sources -- home broadband, smartphone and tablet computer -- say they like having so much information available.

..strike anyone else as a weirdly alien concept of what the word "source" means? It's so incomprehensible, that I can't even say for sure that it's wrong!

Comment Re:HP Envy x360 15 (Score 1) 288

I won't buy a laptop *without* a number pad.

How often do you actually use the keypad, and is it worth the annoyance of having the entire keyboard shifted to the left? You can also forget about anything with a 13- or 14-inch screen if you insist on a built-in keypad.

For the few occasions where I might need to enter lots of numeric data, there are USB keypads.

Comment Re:same as it ever was (Score 1) 288

To be fair the machines with soldered on RAM are often that way because they already have the maximum that the chipset supports.

The thinnest notebooks out there use soldered-on RAM more than likely because sockets would make them thicker. It's not just Apple that's following this approach, either; I have a Dell Latitude 7370 that's fixed at 8 GB RAM. I wouldn't be surprised if a fair number of other "ultrabook" models took the same approach.

(Apparently the entire bottom panel is still removable with some screws, and the SSD is an M.2 (?) unit that can be replaced with something of larger capacity. Nobody's figured out a sufficiently low-profile method for accomodating RAM upgrades, though.)

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