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Comment Re: Amazing (Score 4, Insightful) 373

I've had insurance since I was born, I'm in my 50s, and my cost of insurance jumped 4 times since obamacare. My employer dropped it because insurance rates soared, so I no longer had matching, plus the regular rate better than doubled. And that is for insurance that covers almost nothing until I spend 28,000 because there are virtually NO doctors in the network. And NC has NO options, only Blue Cross. We used to have over half a dozen. My cost of insurance and overall healthcare went from being 5-10% of my income to over 1/3. So fuck your socialized healthcare that says responsible people have to pay insurance for irresponsible people that don't like to work. I'm fine helping those that can't help themselves, but this current bullshit is killing the middle class. You know, the people making 50k a year and pay the highest percentage of their income as tax because they don't make enough to shelter it. But then, that was the original plan, wasn't it? Make a system so god damn bad people would beg for a single payer. Guess what? You got Trump instead, so suck it up Dr. Buttercup. You have no fucking clue the pain this system has caused to hard working, middle American, blue collar people.

Comment Is Swift better than Objective-C for anything? (Score 1) 338

I've been writing Mac and iOS apps with Objective-C for a long time. One of my favorite things about Objective-C is the ability to use C and C++ APIs easily from within my app. Why is Swift even needed at all? What about it is actually better than Objective-C from the standpoint of someone who is already highly proficient in Objective-C and C++?

Comment Pushing up daisies (Score 0) 285

We don't just want you dead, we want you pushing up daisies. Literally.

Totally stupid. Like someone else said, the role of the military is to kill people and break stuff. Nothing else. Not nation building, not inventing environmentally friendly ways to kill. The goal should be to use the military sparingly, then when you do, use the most effective tools to do the ugly but necessary job.

Comment Re:I am not going to complain (Score 1) 181

Speaking as someone who has been involved over a decade as an active admin, the main office is drunk with power and cash. They have deleted many of the photos showing Gardner waving around wads of cash, which were very crass photos to begin with. Volunteers are treated like second class citizens unless you are in the inner circle. How they do fund raising and the way they blow money on "feel good, tree hugging" type events is disgraceful.

Comment Re:Realistic (Score 1) 94

PDAs like the Newton and Palm were great. They had two very obvious barriers that held them back. The first one was they weren't merged with a smart phone. I was a Newton developer and had conversations with people inside and outside of Apple about the need to merge the Newton with a smartphone. The second was lack of internet connectivity. I worked on some projects that involved using a cellular modem with the Newton. At the time it was very slow and very expensive. Just running our (brief) demo cost about $5 worth of data. In the case of the Newton specifically, I think there were looming security problems that would have been a nightmare if it had moved forward and had internet connectivity widely merged with it. The programming model made it easy to access any data on the device and even the internals of other applications. My main point, though, is that it was pretty obvious the kinds of super cool things you could do with PDAs if they had ubiquitous network access and integration with a phone. It isn't clear what technical limitations are in Smart Watches that prevent them from being significantly more useful. Perhaps the Apple Watch will be more useful if Siri becomes more useful and AirPods ever ship? I don't know. Its not that the watch isn't good, it is just that we haven't figured out what compelling use cases exist yet.

Comment Re:Not permanent (Score 1) 186

I read recently that trees and woody plants evolved a long long time before bacteria evolved that could digest the wood. If the coal and oil deposits were created in an environment without that bacteria, then when we run out of oil, we will have very little oil left and more won't be made even if you waited millions of years. Imagine if a future intelligent species (likely not mammalian species either) examines the fossil record of its time and learns that we lived hundreds of millions of years ago in a time of free oxygen, followed by the vast majority of oil suddenly being missing in the fossil record, followed by a period of only anaerobic life, and then a whole second story of evolution. Those creatures will freak the fuck out if they find evidence that we had a culture in the fossil record. They might even find evidence of human technology that is more advanced than theirs. I wonder if they would wonder why we didn't industrialize with nuclear power? They almost certainly will find evidence of nuclear technologies. They will wonder why we killed ourselves.

Comment Re: good for them (Score 3, Insightful) 186

While I agree that is true and while I agree that life actually put it into the resevoirs you are talking about, *our species* evolved after the coal and oil resevoirs were created. I would mention that life was common on earth prior to the introduction of free oxygen in the atmosphere. The "natural state" does not involve O2 in the atmosphere.

Submission + - OAuth 2.0 Flaw Exposes 1 Billion Mobile Apps to Takeover (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: Third-party applications that allow single sign-on via Facebook and Google and support the OAuth 2.0 protocol, are exposed to account hijacking.

Three Chinese University of Hong Kong researchers presented at Black Hat EU last week a paper called “Signing into One Billion Mobile LApp Accounts Effortlessly with OAuth 2.0.” The paper describes an attack that takes advantage of poor OAuth 2.0 implementations and puts more than one billion apps in jeopardy.

The researchers examined 600 top U.S. and Chinese mobile apps that use OAuth 2.0 APIs from Facebook, Google and Sina—which operates Weibo in China—and support SSO for third-party apps. The researchers found that 41.2 percent of the apps they tested were vulnerable to their attack, including popular dating, travel, shopping, hotel booking, finance, chat, music and news apps. None of the apps were named in the paper, but some have been downloaded hundreds of millions of times and can be exploited for anything from free phone calls to fraudulent purchases.

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