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Comment Re:Probably Can't Do That (Score 1) 246

I go running in the park, I sometimes see kids playing it in groups. I usually give them a friendly hello and ask them if they've caught any yet as I pass. It's not inconceivable that a sex offender could strike up a more meaningful conversation, so I can see some kind of connection.

The fact that you often meet kids who are playing Pokémon Go in the park, despite you not playing Pokémon Go, just highlights how utterly pointless this kneejerk rubbish is. It would be more effective for them to ban children from playing the game, and of course even more effective to ban children from ever going outdoors.
But that would not only be stupid, it would also be obviously stupid and unfair to kids.

It's seen as socially acceptable to propose arbitrary limitations on the freedom of sexual offenders, because apparently being released doesn't imply any kind of rehabilitation has happened. This just further reinforces the message that being imprisoned in the first place was about punishment rather than rehabilitation. It's a shame that vengeance and judgement are still such a big part of modern society.

Comment Re:I'm curious... (Score 1) 155

Just checked mine and both apps are using 475 megs of space. This is not counting cached data. Anything over that depends on what you send such as images and so on. Cached data depends on what the user does thus can't really place blame on the app.

Sure they can blame the app, if it doesn't manage the cached data properly. If you design programs that make use of a cache, one of the first steps you should take, especially on mobile devices, is to check that the cache doesn't grow beyond a certain limit.

Comment Re:Not quite AV, but close (Score 1) 74

completely immune to random internet-based attacks, at least ignoring user actions like launching an infected program or script

Or using a web browser to view a news article on Forbes triggering popunders with malware exploits, or looking at a page which happens to contain a PNG file designed to exploit a buffer overflow in the PNG parsing library, or running AV software which scans a ZIP file that happens to be crafted to exploit a vulnerability in the archive extraction library. Or really installing any software, ever.

If there's two things we could do to mitigate the damage caused by these exploits, it's:
1: Stop using C and C++ to write programs. People are still shooting themselves (and all users of their software) in the foot by accidentally introducing stack-smashing vulnerabilities and the like into their code in 2016, and that's embarrassing and unnecessary.
2: Figure out how to automatically use virtualisation containers like Docker to isolate every user program into a separate virtual environment that prevents them from accidentally destroying the system. Without the user needing to even know anything about it...

Comment Re:Older people who feel in love with basic on c64 (Score 3, Insightful) 112

It is true... C64 "V2" Basic was my first taste of programming and I was pretty much hooked straight away, even though it was a fairly unpleasant dialect, with line numbers and no auto-renumbering function, only two significant characters in variable names (so "speed" and "spinning" were the same variable, leading to code with awful variable names) and the lack of any commands for controlling the audio hardware or doing anything with video other than writing characters and symbols. The only way to make sound or create sprites (or even change the screen colours) was to use POKE commands to write to arbitrary memory locations (generally through trial and error, as a kid with no documentation, before the web existed).

Still, there was enough magic there that once you'd really gotten a taste for it, there was no going back. On the plus side, almost every programming language after that seemed really reasonable if not generous :)

Comment Re: Deep cynicism (Score 1) 113

I am sure the FBI has better things to do than spy on innocent people. From the sheer fact that they were monitoring him we can safely assume that he is a spy, and is guilty as sin.

He got away with it this time, but justice will be served eventually. And one thing's for sure, whether he got away with it or not, everybody knows he is a spy now so you can bet nobody will make the mistake of trusting him with that kind of power again!

Yes, because forget about "innocent until proven guilty", or even "innocent until a trial starts", let's just have "guilty if any government agency files any charges, even if they withdraw the charges later".
It's great that we have objective, rational people like you on juries to decide whether people spend life in jail, walk free or are executed. We can all sleep safely knowing that, thanks to objective, rational people like you, nobody will ever be wrongfully imprisoned or executed without the highest standards of evidence.

Comment Re:Hahah (Score 1) 246

What kind of rational human being does this? Did you try to set fire to your schools property because of a bad grade? I'll look past the B&E and unauthorized access.

He is dangerous, to himself and others. If not juvie, then a psych eval and treatment.

He's a kid, not a rational human being. He needs emotional help, like lots of kids (and sadly, lots of adults). Do you honestly think he'll get that help by being thrown in "juvie", excluded and shunned from normal society?

Comment Re:Hahah (Score 1) 246

He did the crime (actually several), he must do the time.

If he wants to play big boy games then he must accept big boy penalties. Fuck your PC "Oh but he's a kid with his whole life ahead of him!" bullshit, he's chosen his path, let him reap the consequences.

This medieval attitude is one reason why the US has the biggest prison population in the world and one of, if not the worst rates of recidivism.

What this kid needs is some help, not "big boy penalties", a.k.a. incarceration and a lifelong criminal record which marks him as "different" from normal people in a way that affects him negatively for the rest of his life. Stop doing that.

Comment Re:and no one gives a damn. (Score 1) 328

One thing we've noticed is the other side: it's often cheaper to just buy the movie, watch it at home (home-popped popcorn) and throw away the disc afterwards than it is to watch it in the theatre.

Home movies have gotten so much cheaper than theatres that this is feasible for most movies. We still see the odd one in the theatre, but that has gotten quite rare over the years.

You actually have something there. HDTV's are relatively cheap compared to the original vacuum tube variety that was used for standard definition. Even if you want to buy a 4K HDTV over the now standard 2K (1080p) 15:9 aspect ratio HDTV's you may pay about 10% more. In fact it is possible to set-up a reasonable home theatre (includes HDTV, DVD/BD player, amplifier and speakers) system for under $2000. Of course you could spend ridicules amounts of money on a home theatre system as well.

If you are into watching movies it is actually cheaper to either rent or if you think you may want to watch the movie again then purchase the Blu-ray. Even if that movie is the latest release and costs say $30 it would still be cheaper to purchase and watch with friends and family than go to a movie theatre.

It probably would be cheaper over the long-haul, plus you don't have people standing up in front of you in the middle of the "closure" scene just to beat the queue to get out... argh, so inconsiderate! Also, you can pause it at any point to talk, make tea or go for a piss. And you don't have to spend time and money travelling to/from the theatre and parking. I'm poor so I neither go to the cinema nor have a big home cinema system, but that'll definitely be my preferred choice upon leaving poverty :D

Comment Re:i vote with my wallet (Score 1) 328

cool. then boycott copyrighted works and advocate for changing the law. don't steal. is that what you want to teach your kids?

The point of contention here is that these "copyrighted works" are very old and could be considered culturally significant, and that the current rights holders are not the people who created the works.

Consider this: imagine these laws were even more extreme and it was illegal to share or view an image of the Mona Lisa or a copy of Shakespeare's works online without paying Fox or MGM a stupid sum of money. In that case, would you advocate that society boycott reading Shakespeare or viewing the Mona Lisa? Is that what you want to teach your kids -- to lie back and accept an unjust situation? If so, why? If not, why is it a different situation to "Attack of the 50-foot Woman"?

Comment Re: Why do people still care about C++ for kernel (Score 1) 365

Well, one way, you can monitor heap usage and trend the usage immediately following full GCs.

The other way to look at it is as a function of time.

None of that applies to modern server-centric garbage collection (GC1). "Stop the world while I collect garbage" makes a server worthless if you have 64 GB and GB takes minutes, which is why the default GC for the server SDK hasn't worked that way since mid Java 7.

That's not quite true; even without a "stop the world" collector, you can still look at the amount of time the parallel GC thread is busy. In fact there seems to be quite a bit of information available with tools such as jstat. Perhaps this could help you better understand actual heap use (this is also a problem I face at work -- processes that run out of heap after many hours, expectedly... argh).

Some info about jstat: http://www.cubrid.org/blog/dev...
Info about G1 (although you already seem very familiar with it): http://www.infoq.com/articles/...

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