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Comment Re: Is the systemd problem fixed? (Score 1) 76

I guess I've always assumed the bar for maintaining interface stability for users space was much higher. The interface line has always been between kernel and users space. I'm not ready to give that line up to the systemd team. But we have to support our users so we don't get to choose. So I try to make sure lapses don't go unnoticed in the hopes that systemd culture might change with enough "gentle nudging" from the community.

And I've never been what I would call a Stallmanite either, but seeing where all the concerns are with mobile and IoT devices not getting updates, I can see that we are about to find Richard was right, yet again.

Comment Re: Is the systemd problem fixed? (Score 1) 76

Most recent on slashdot was breaking the backgrounding of processes.

Which is disabled by a simple option in the config file. Which Debian has done, btw.

Yes, but I won't how long until this non-default config breaks something else. I don't trust them.

My product had our (once) portable init script broken in RHEL7.2 by a systemd change that now declares that the init.d script cannot be a symlink to the product installation area

Really? Are you sure? I just tried that and it works.

Yes. From https://bugzilla.redhat.com/sh...
"Note that the real location of the init script must be on the partition that is mounted in the initial ramdisk (initrd)"

Comment Re: Is the systemd problem fixed? (Score 4, Insightful) 76

I could agree with this, but my problem is upstream. The systemd folks keep breaking or changing things that were once standard, documented and could be counted on. Most recent on slashdot was breaking the backgrounding of processes. Given the creation of an 'su' function I'm waiting for su, sudo and the like to be declared broken and for the accompanying posix calls to be superseded by function in libsystemd.

My product had our (once) portable init script broken in RHEL7.2 by a systemd change that now declares that the init.d script cannot be a symlink to the product installation area. This worked in RHEL 7.1 with systemd and with prior releases and other (pre-systemd) distributions. Yet another gentle nudge to doing things the systemd way, or else.

If I trusted upstream to maintain a interface that could be made portable I'd be less resistive to systemd. It provides some good features, even if the architecture is awful. A sane, portable re-implementation for be made once the current architecture shows its problems. But a re-implementation won't be possible with an upstream that breaks compatibility without a second thought.

The fact that the community has accepted this so willingly makes me dread the day that Linus gives up the reigns of the kernel. It's not unlikely that we'll wind up with the kernel being led by a twit, a push over or a committee.

Comment I would not recommend windows 10. (Score 1) 982

I would not recommend windows 10. I don't trust or approve of the telemetry and the lack of control allowed to the user. I do not trust Microsoft with the assorted settings with documentation informing the user it will revert if changed. I don't trust Microsoft's judgement after they implemented and made default the feature to sent wireless password to all contacts. I do not trust Windows 10 and I will not allow it on any network for which I am responsible.

Comment Re:Exactly right (Score 1) 257

Hopefully the kids in Hockey helmets are gone now.

I like you already.

Upgrading does not fix security holes, it replaces them.

True, it a sense. Yes, please don't get rid of you current bugs, replacing them with undiscovered new ones. A stationary target is much easier to hit.

If you never connect to public wifi you don't have the same risk footprint as someone who does. If you don't use your phones web browser why do you need it patched exactly? Believe it or not, plenty of people use their smartphone as a phone and ignore the smart.

Again, true. If you don't use it, it's more secure. A brick would cost less, but I'll admit it's heavier, awkward and plain unsightly. Spend a little more and get a cut bathroom tile. Secure, cheap, no maintenance, pleasant to hold and look at, just what the doctor ordered. I'm on-board with you.

Comment Who to believe... (Score 4, Insightful) 209

Who do we believe? The fellow who worked at/for the NSA back when they still have the cover of secrecy of a "pre-Snowden" world? Or the fellow who went for a rid-a-long after the NSA had knew they were being watched? One of them provided a bunch of evidence of NSA behavior. The other tells us they mean well.

The moment we were hearing the words "Unconstitutional but legal" the debate should have ended.

Comment Re:Do I really need to point out the fix? (Score 1) 105

I can't disagree. For now I'm holding out for the Pyra.

I can't remember off the top of my head why I haven't considered the Blackphone. Probably just that I hadn't heard anything more of it since before it was released. I'll have to give it another look.

Comment Re:Do I really need to point out the fix? (Score 1) 105

The wide variety of Android devices available means there are Android phones for every niche.

Well, as someone who would like a useful and flexible device that provides privacy instead of privacy policies, I wouldn't say it's covered every niche yet.

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