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Submission + - Windows 10 Anniversary Update Borks Dual-Boot Partitions (omgubuntu.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: It seems that the latest version of Microsoft’s OS has attention issues. Not content with forcing itself on users who didn’t want it, it may be taking even more drastic steps of hosing other operating systems entirely!

A handful of reports surfacing on social media suggest, anecdotally, that the Windows 10 anniversary may interfere with, affect and even delete other partitions on the same disk.

Submission + - FAA authorizes private robotic space shot to the moon (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: he Federal Aviation Administration this week granted permission to a privately-held space firm to launch a robotic spacecraft to the moon. Moon Express expects to launch its MX-1 spacecraft on a two-week mission to the lunar surface in 2017. The MX-1, which is about as large as a suitcase will include instruments and a camera to explore the moon’s surface.

Submission + - NVIDIA's Pascal-Based Titan X Tested, Expensive But Dominates Benchmarks (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: NVIDIA took the wraps off its new Pascal-based, flagship graphics card, dubbed the Titan X, a couple of weeks ago, but only pictures and specifications were available. NVIDIA Titan X cards are now shipping in limited quantities, however, and the benchmark numbers are in. The new Titan X (the company kept the same branding as its previous Maxwell-based Titan), based on NVIDIA's Pascal architecture, is some 60 percent faster than its older, Maxwell-based Titan counterpart and 20 – 30 percent faster than the new GeForce GTX 1080. On board Titan X are 1024 more CUDA cores versus a GeForce GTX 1080 (3584 versus 2560) and a wider 384-bit GDDR5X memory bus versus the 1080's 256-bit interface. Though the Titan X has the same memory clock as a GTX 1080, it has 12GB of GDDR5X memory, versus 8GB on the 1080. In testing, nothing can touch it and there's still additional headroom for overclocking. The new Titan X's $1200 price point, however, will give even hardcore gamers sticker shock. For graphics professionals and deep learning applications it could be a reasonably good value though, versus pro graphics GPUs.

Submission + - PGP Key of President of the Muslim Association of Puget Sound Trivially Factored

An anonymous reader writes: One of seven keys recently found to be trivially factorable by the Phuctor belongs to Mahmood Khadeer, President of the Muslim Association of Puget Sound. Khadeer's key and the others appear to have been generated with PGP software that utilized a null random number generator based on the way they were factored.

Submission + - It's November, 2016 - for whom do you vote?

DavidHumus writes: There appears to be a distinct political slant on /. but what is it, exactly? We should have a poll, preferably near the day of the US presidential election, where slashdotters vote for their candidate of choice. Since we're not all Americans or non-felons, the poll should allow us to indicate whether we actually can vote in this election and if we will (or did, depending on when the poll runs) vote.

Comment Re:Frequently is the answer (Score 1) 331

You are correct that the delivery environment is more different than the language used; similarly, different problem domains have far greater differences than do programming languages. In fact, as many have already noticed, most programming languages are extremely similar. From Fortran to Python, there's a very small difference if you're familiar with languages that are outliers: ones like Forth, Lisp, APL, J and K.

This is probably not unrelated to the fact that progress in programming languages has been glacial compared to progress in hardware.

Submission + - Are Face Recognition Systems Accurate?

Presto Vivace writes: Are Face Recognition Systems Accurate? Depends on Your Race.

In 2012, Jain and several colleagues used a set of mugshots from the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office in Florida to examine the performance of several commercially available face recognition systems, including ones from vendors that supply law enforcement agencies. The algorithms were consistently less accurate on women, African-Americans, and younger people. Apparently they were trained on data that was not representative enough of those groups, says Jain.

Submission + - Watch a car thief steal a Jeep with only a laptop (cnet.com)

tripleevenfall writes: The below video from the Houston Police Department shows a man entering a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. After a few minutes of fiddling with a laptop, the car disappears down the street. The whole job takes about 13 minutes.

The police are unclear as to what role the laptop played in the theft, according to the Wall Street Journal article that mentions this video. Fiat Chrysler gave the WSJ not much more than a boilerplate response about taking security seriously.

Comment Pen and paper used to be good enough for me... (Score 1) 286

I have pocket-sized notebooks (mostly "neat-bound", not spiral) going back to the '80s but have stopped taking many notes that way for the past couple of years. I use emacs if I'm at a desktop. For my phone, I do have Evernote and have used it a little but mostly I just e-mail myself notes. That way they're automatically "synched" and searchable. The notes in emacs get saved as part of my backups, so are also available and searchable.

Submission + - Russia hacks DNC, "steals" anti-Trump research (washingtonpost.com)

mi writes: Russian government hackers penetrated the computer network of the Democratic National Committee and gained access to the entire database of opposition research on GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, according to committee officials and security experts who responded to the breach.

The intruders so thoroughly compromised the DNC’s system they also were able to read all e-mail and chat traffic, said DNC officials and the security experts.

Submission + - Home Depot automatically connecting in-store purchases to your online identity

SlashD0tter writes: Like many Home Depot patrons, I occasionally purchase items from them on-line as well as by visiting their local store. The on-line purchases are usually followed up from them with pesky requests to review whatever I just bought on-line. Imagine my surprise this morning when I received one of those pesky requests for something I'd purchased in-person using a generic (not Home Depot) credit card. Pretty smart of them to connect an on-line purchaser with a real-live person? Or pretty creepy, instead?

Comment Re:That's okay (Score 4, Insightful) 742

Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld overrode the Pentagon's concerns about the overthrow of Saddam Hussein. We were repeatedly told the war would be over very quickly, a matter of weeks, and that the Iraqis would pay for the reconstruction of their country through oil revenues. We were also told we would be welcomed with open arms by the entire Iraqi community.

And as bad and stupid as all this was, Trump's current recruitment drive for ISIS trumps (ahem) even this. It seems that his demagoguery is an attempt to inflame his fraidy-cat supporters and help radical Islam by pushing the moderates toward them. They're so frightened that they're willing to abandon traditional American ideals like religious tolerance and justice and they're so stupid that they can't figure out that this is exactly the wrong thing to do in terms of the real-life consequences.

This is not to defend Clinton's arrogant refusal to follow the rules but to point out that when there's a choice between bad and worse, we have to choose bad.

Submission + - Winning War for IT Talent Requires New Solutions

HamIAm writes: New Harvard Business Review research released today says the "shift to a digital economy is creating a talent crisis that is putting companies' survival on the line." HBR interviewed over a dozen CIOs and HR professionals who all said traditional approaches to attracting and retaining IT staff are no longer working. The report outlines several new solutions for IT talent management — from exploring new, more diverse talent pools including individuals with autism, to rethinking how IT work is structured, to using open source as a magnet for talent.

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It seems that more and more mathematicians are using a new, high level language named "research student".

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