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Comment Re:My first first? (Score 1) 251

GP is right, All the vendors market to the guys wearing stars

GP can only be partially right.

Are you actually surprised that the Apple product out performed the Android device? I know I'm not. The devices simply aren't competing on the same level. IOS is for Apple's device only. It's fine tuned for its hardware and vice versa. Android is tailored for devices and fine tuned by the manufacturer. This is a clear disadvantage for the platform.

My 2 cents!

I'm a little fuzzy on how allowing further tuning below the company level is a disadvantage, as opposed to the walled garden....

Comment Re:Blizzard takes games seriously (Score 1) 250

You'd be dead right.... if it weren't "opt-in" - You agree to the ToS when you buy the game. No different to getting a drivers licence - When you get one you're suddenly liable for a lot more than you would otherwise have been. If you don't want to have to follow the road rules then - yup - you don't drive, noone is forcing you to. Noone is forcing you to buy a software product and agree to how you use it.
It's common practice to require a signed agreement in order to receive (usually limited) access to something, be it a game, data used in running a business, or anything.
Every other business gets a legal recourse, but because this is 'just a game' they shouldn't have one?

p.s. (not advocating this at all, but I think it's better than the current system blizzard is using)
( snipped from: http://www.mapsofworld.com/spo... )
Punishment for Athletes in ancient Summer Games
In the ancient Summer Games, there were rules for every game contested for. Those who cheated or violated the rules were disqualified from the contest. Along with the contestant, the trainer and the sponsoring city-state were also fined.

Cheaters could be punished by whipping or levying heavy fines on them. The money from these fines was used to construct bronze statues of Zeus. These statues were placed along the tunnel that leads to the stadium. Each statue's inscription told the cautionary tale of the offense. The athletes walked past these statues as a reminder of the importance of obeying the rules.

Comment Re:Blizzard takes games seriously (Score 1) 250

Well, lets say you walk into a police station.
You decide that you want to go behind their desk, and hop on their computer, access their internal systems, find out where your ex is living, whatever.
Well, while the police station is there for you to visit and place complaints at, etc, and the computer systems hold the data that makes this possible, it's protected data, and you're not allowed to look at it like that or use it that way.

What bossland is accessing is protected code. They are reading it out of the memory, modifying it, and then using that to render an interface showing that hidden information.

An alternate example:
Think of blizzard as the olympic committee (they exist, right?). They have set up the olympic games (overwatch) and people can enter and compete by buying tickets. As I'm using the olympics as my example I trust you're generally familiar with the sort of rules and agreements a competitor must agree to.
Bossland would be the shady 'doctor' that hangs around at the contestant entrance selling performance enhancing drugs. (And unfortunately these drugs don't have any foolproof detection rate).

Three things can happen here.
1) run the shady doctor off - throw him in jail, ideally. (what would happen if this were real world)
2) cancel the games - if you can't have a level playing field, there's no point to the competition. (this seems to be what many here think would be the best solution - 'it's not illegal, you can't do anything about it')
I'm in favour of working through the legal system to try to reach (1) - This in reality means law reform, probably, or enhanced trade agreements (and we all know how those go) So I totally get that it's no easy path, but I far prefer it to option 2.

Comment Re: Blizzard: Get a new business model (Score 1) 250

Why can't your other replies be this level-headed? See, you admit Bossland hasn't broken any laws (at least in as far as the information available), which means -- GASP -- we actually agree on this point and there was no reason for us to argue in the first place. Funny how that works, isn't it? And yes, the outcome will be quite interesting, no matter which way it goes. My money's on Bossland's owners simply deciding to ignore it and never setting foot in the US for the rest of their lives. After all, it's a civil matter and civil extradition treaties aren't a thing (yet; thankfully).

I never claimed bossland has broken any laws.... where did I do that? Unless I was pointing out that they've broken US laws in which case I was also acknowledging that they don't operate out of the US.) The legal system is decades behind this sort of issue.
It's already pretty clear bossland is going to try to just ignore it, they've been doing that for years. But I don't care what bossland _do_ I care about what the courts do. What bossland 'does' has no relevance here.

And of course you are thankful that people in one country can't be punished for their offences to another country. You're a lawyer.
It's that kind of attitude that leads to all our international wars - When you can't prosecute someone for stealing your IP/whatever and costing you money, well, what's left to you? Funny how that works, isn't it?
If Blizzard fail to shut down bosslands activity this way, I'd expect them to sue the german government itself, and progress from there.

Comment Re: Blizzard: Get a new business model (Score 1) 250

OK, are we still talking about black market drug companies or not? Changing your version of the definition does indeed rended my issue with black market drug companies moot. Congratulations.

Considering that I made the original mention of drug companies, after Calydor mentioned doping, and neither he nor I said anything about black market drug companies. Yes, I did mention black market drugs, but any prescription drug solt outside of a licensed pharmacy fits that definition. You're the one who changed the definition, I merely shifted it back.

Still unclear? are we talking about black market drug companies, or not?

I did check out the site, and also read about the suit, etc... the program access overwatches protected game code through methoes explicitly prohibited mbyt the licencing agreement to generate their overlay.

It doesn't "access the code", it accesses the areas of the system's RAM the game uses for data storage. Try again.

Yup, and what's in that protected memory they decrypt and modify? Oh, yeah, game code. It's a bit complicated, funnily enough, but that's what the courts are there to decide. You've made it clear you don't know what you're talking about already, however :)

You can keep on saying that bossland isn't doing anything wrong

I could, if that's what I were saying at all. What I'm saying, however, is that they're not doing anything illegal. I'm sure you can figure out the difference and how it is key to this discussion.

No, I've been saying all along that bossland is wrong, that the legal system isn't capable of handling international intellectual property rights, and that Bliz has just cause to take them to court and establish a precedent.
You seem to think that Blizzard has no merit, period, and should let bossland do as they please. It's laughable, but now I know you're apparently a lawyer, I see why you're on this path

(that's OK, I'm a programmer, I'm pretty sure you're not)

You fail pretty badly at logic for a supposed programmer. You seem to be pretty sure about a lot of things; this is just one more you're wrong about. In addition, I have a legal background, which also qualifies me to comment (with authority) on legal matters.

Now it comes clear, you have a lawyers mind.
As for my logic, I'm still waiting for you to illustrate a single flaw in it, however now I know you're a lawyer I understand that you merely obfuscate what you don't understand, and are trying to jam your personal ideas of what it should be onto it. I can't criticise you for it really, it's what works in the courtroom.
It also explains why you're continuing to fight a losing argument even when you are wildly unqualified :)

The rest of the diatribe the two quotes above came from is irrelevant, as it's based on an entirely incorrect premise.

You keep making statements like this.... I know it's a good court tactic, but this is a forum and you're going to have to back up your statements with something. I know you won't, because you can't, but it'd be nice if you at least tried :)

Oh, The US legal system is horrible, most legal systems are, but they're the best we have, and one of the few avenues open to Blizzard.

But, Bossland has broken now laws and committed no civil infractions, so it will be a tough road for them.

It's going to be a tough road regardless. As for if Bossland has broken any laws, clearly they have, they just are outside of those laws jurisdiction (as those laws were created in and for a time where this kind of predatory business practices weren't even conceived)
Fortunately it doesn't matter that it's going to be tough (btw, you're a lawyer, how many "easy" cases like this do you come across? I'd have figured they're all tough, regardless of if laws are broken or not) cause this kind of thing is part of doing business, and Blizz has some good lawyers. So good on them, lets hope that there's justice at the end (wait, you're a lawyer, justice isn't relevant to you)

Of course they'll take it, and while noone thinks the USA governs Germany, I'm pretty sure most here have a decent understanding of trade partnerships, and what happens when 2 countries don't get along.

Right, and the US and EU have no problems exchanging criminals for trial; however, this is a civil matter and we still (thankfully) don't have civil extradition agreements in place. Imagine that, someone anywhere in the world being allowed to bring suit against you in their home country and you having to travel, at your own expense, to defend yourself. Jurisdictional borders exist for a reason.

Indeed they do, and that's where it gets complicated (how can you not realise this as a lawyer?!?) - if bossland was only doing business with german citizens and hacking german made games, then no worries, let germany sort it out, but bossland is doing business internationally, and hacking foreign software.
You still think that just because they're in germany they should get a free pass?

Look at Cuba, think they'll pull the same stuff this time round?

That was the result is armed conflict, not civil disagreements between US and Cuban businesses. Totally not relevant here.

Totally relevant as an example of what one country can do to another if they piss it off. But of course you'll focus on the reason for that particular embargo and claim that negates relevance, no surprise there, keep on with your misdirection :)

Projection of what? You keep making these little comments, but never offer any substance to them.

You were projecting your head-placement habits onto me. Clearly, you had it firmly stowed when you wrote this reply. I see a second reply, as well.. that should be fun.

I was projecting my ignorance of software development and hacking onto you? Is that what you mean? Or merely pointing out what you confirmed with the above reply: You don't know about software, you're a lawyer. What you care about is what can be argued in court to protect your clients, regardless of truth or fairness. (See how when I make statements I qualify them with logic and reasoning (which you don't need to agree with, but can't even provide your own) - try it out, we might get somewhere. So far all you've done is bluster and say "no that's wrong", please try to add something next time, you're not giving me much to work with here)

Comment Re:Blizzard takes games seriously (Score 1) 250

I went through and read the actual suit since as usual the summary is garbage. Blizzard is 90% blowing smoke here, but the claims that actually have some merit are:

1. Intentional interference with contractual relations: since cheating is against the EULA, they are facilitating other people violating EULAs. 2. Since the cheat makers themselves were violating the EULA by developing/testing cheats, they were thus infringing copyright.

The rest of the claims require some major mental gymnastics, like claiming that when the cheat modifies the workings of the game (unclear as to whether it actually does that, or just reads memory and creates on overlay), it constitutes a derivative work. But the claims that do have merit are actually a pretty crafty end run.

However, the implication of #2 is that if someone cheats at a game, they are on the hook for piracy. Pretty scary precedent especially in situations where it's not 100% clear what constitutes a cheat.

Oh, you're dead on the lawsuit details are smoky at best, but I see that as part of the legal system as a whole, and in particular an archaic legal system trying to solve problems in a world of international digital goods and services that are traded and sold between such legal systems, etc... There's more gymnastics required than I have the patience or inclination to unravel :P
And yeah, the judge on this is going to need to be very careful what precedent is set, however i think it's pretty clear that there's a problem here, and I would love to think that there's the possibility of a good precedent being set here, one that protects creators and their creations from this sort of abuse, in the international community. (But odds are it won't)

Comment Re: Blizzard: Get a new business model (Score 1) 250

Yup, and they will continue to do so as they detect them, and they change their patterns, etc.... It's a neverending battle.
But that's not a 100% solution, and Bliz has put a lot of effort into this game and wants it to be the best it can be, so they're also pursuing other avenues, like trying to end the battle legally.
But the law hasn't caught up with the interconnected world, else bossland would never have dared to attempt profiting off them (and us, if you're a paying customer of overwatch or the other games they have done similar things to) this way in the first place. So it'll be interesting to see the outcome of the case.

There's a lot of interesting discussions about how global connectivity and digital goods and services will be continually at odds with a non-global authority to govern it.
Meanwhile, Blizz will continue to pursue whatever avenues are available to it both in the US and the EU (and wherever else they do business)

Comment Re: Blizzard: Get a new business model (Score 1) 250

OK, I stand corrected on antibiotics vs anabiotics/whatever they're illegally producing but it doesn't change in any way my point - black market drugs are unregulated, and untested by the proper authorities, and as such unsafe, regardless of what they are, and they were developed at great cost by a different company who would like to recoup their cost legally by selling what they developed legally, etc... so sure, nitpick all you like. My first point stands

Actually, the anabolic steroids are legally produced, they're either prescribed for off-label uses or obtained illegally, but neither of those are the fault of the companies legally producing them. Their illegal use (again, not the fault of the manufacturer) is against the rules of basically every professional athletic association in the world, but that's between the athletes and the associations, not the associations and the drug companies. If your point stands it's not supported by this argument.

OK, are we still talking about black market drug companies or not? Changing your version of the definition does indeed rended my issue with black market drug companies moot. Congratulations.

Bossland is using private methods of access explicitly against the ToS to give game players access to more than blizzard gave those players rights or access to, and are charging these players for this access. Blizzard's regular customers are being impacted and receiving a worse experience, bossland is making a profit off blizzard's intellectual property.

Did you even google "Watchover Tyrant" to see what it actually does or how it works? It's an overlay, it reads from the RAM used by the game on the user's local system and draws a graphical overlay on top of the game; it doesn't control the player or enhance the player's health, armor, or weapons in any way. It's literally just a graphical overlay. It doesn't use Blizzard's servers in any way, nor does it use "private methods of access", it simply reads (and doesn't write) game RAM. It's questionable whether this violates the ToS in any way, as Overwatch and WoW have the same ToS and similar add-ons for WoW exist with Blizzard's blessing. Where Blizzard draws the line is writing to game RAM, injecting mouse or keyboard commands into the game (though some macro add-ons exist, which do this with Blizzard's blessing) or communicating with the game servers directly. Even if it is, in fact, a ToS violation, that's not a legal or civil matter and Blizzard's recourse is to terminate the offending account(s). Again, if your point does, in fact, stand, it is not supported by this argument.

I did check out the site, and also read about the suit, etc... the program access overwatches protected game code through methoes explicitly prohibited mbyt the licencing agreement to generate their overlay. Blizzard draws the line where they please. Hell, they have the right to ban you if you don't use any cheating software at all, if you want to get technical. They can ban you for taking advantage of an unintended feature, i.e. abusing a bug. And they define what a bug is, as it's their code and only they know it's intent (though they're pretty crystal clear on their intent)
Regardless my point stands.

They hacked into blizzard's code, and use a modified version of it to generate an overlay showing the intentionally hidden information. So yes, they've broken into overwatch. Their customers of course pay for their original copy of the game, and then pay bossland to hack it for them. Their resulting versions ruin the game for legal customers, which means that prospective legal customers will be less likely to purchase it. So yes, they have made money off blizzard's back that has resulted in blizzard losing money, the basic premise that restitution addresses.

They didn't touch Blizzard's code, they used a read-only debugger (of sorts) to determine where the game stores various bits of data in order to extract them to enable the generation of a graphical overlay layer. Bossland customers are still legal customers of Blizzard's service, as well; Blizzard has every right to terminate their accounts for violating the ToS, but there is no legal or civil recourse to be had. In fact, Blizzard has done so already; they've already enabled detection of this cheat overlay and implemented auto-bans for its use, so it is no longer an issue.

Still failing to actually add anything pertinent to the discussion or make much sense here mate.... but lets keep going: Well, at least you recognize it. Oh, wait, you're talking about me, aren't you? Hey, well, I've done my research and know what is actually being discussed here while you, well... clearly, you have not.

OK, I guess you didn't so I'll explain: I laid your argument out and pointed out all the gaping holes in it, which is what you attempted to do, but failed at. Unfortunately, I used logic and reasoning, and you're too busy playing semantics and pedantics.

No, you really didn't poke holes in anything. You haven't demonstrated any legal issues. Moral and ethical issues? Sure. But, then, I never said otherwise.

As such, I used your line "See what I did there?" satirically.

And incorrectly.

I guess you made a typo when googling a definition of satire :)

As I was the one writing it, and thus doing it, I know what I did there, and why I did it (as will others with decent reading comprehension, which is a surprisingly large portion of /., yourself currently excluded)

No, you know what you were trying to do. You failed, you just don't recognize that you failed.

Actually, I'm doing just fine thanks, I don't need to convince you nor particularly care if you learn anything.

Seems it sailed over your head however, despite claims to the contrary. That's OK though, I'm not replying to you specifically for you, though you're free to benefit from it (though you clearly prefer to argue, regardless of merit)

Oh, no, I get what you were trying to do. You don't get that you failed.

I guess I'll refer you above, as you're just repeating stuff now like that makes it true (and no doubt it does to you, that's fine)

OK, Blizzard is selling "a way to compete with other people" - It's designed the game and the rules.

Agreed.

How is someone changing the rules for a small subset of the players for their own profit in any way related to any sort of "repair facility"

You compared Bossland to companies that build on the infrastructure of other companies. I provided two examples where this is commonly done legally, at the expense of the developer and maintainer of said infrastructure. It's also commonly done in the last mile DSL market pretty much everywhere in the world, is a common practice on cable networks in (at least) Canada, and, well, if you look for it you'll see it everywhere. You're slightly (more than, but whatever) changing your argument here, but that's fine, your prior argument didn't hold up. Bossland isn't changing the rules, they're providing a graphical overlay to display game data, nothing more.

You can keep on saying that bossland isn't doing anything wrong, I explained what they are doing above, you don't understand it (that's OK, I'm a programmer, I'm pretty sure you're not) and you think it's fine. I don't know what world you live in that you think this is all good, but most of the rest of us want to play the overwatch we paid for, not a hybrid with an unidentifiable second tier of rules and play and information. And the people who made and are licensing and supporting and who actually own the game think the same, and are fighting it in courts... But you just see it as... wait, are you a bossland rep? that's one of the only things that'd make sense here. (And don't bother answering that, I know if you are you'll deny it, and if you aren't you'll deny it, i'm just puzzling about as to what your possible perspective could be, that misses so much)

Bossland isn't repairing anything, it's literally doing the opposite. it's literally "breaking the game".

I won't disagree with either of those statements, actually. But, then, they don't really support legal or civil action against Bossland. Especially in the US, where Bossland has no presence. Blizzard does have a presence in the EU, though; perhaps they should be suing there, you know, in a court with actual jurisdiction over Bossland. Bossland could just as well wipe their as with a US court summons over this civil matter and, provided the owners simply never set foot in the US, nothing can be done about it; and, honestly, looking around at what this country has become, I don't think they'd really be missing out if they did.

Oh, The US legal system is horrible, most legal systems are, but they're the best we have, and one of the few avenues open to Blizzard. Of course they'll take it, and while noone thinks the USA governs Germany, I'm pretty sure most here have a decent understanding of trade partnerships, and what happens when 2 countries don't get along. Look at Cuba, think they'll pull the same stuff this time round?

It's OK, you didn't need to answer, we all know where your head is, and what you can see from there :)

I sense projection.

Projection of what? You keep making these little comments, but never offer any substance to them.

Comment Re:There's a contradiction there. (Score 1) 250

Next time you reply to someone, don't use a phrase like "troll blather". It makes you look like a frothy fanboy or a Blizzard intern.

I'm a fan, for sure.
But I'm a fan because of the quality of their product and the efforts they go to to maintain it's integrity, which are fairly good reasons I think.
And my arguments are mostly from the perspectives of both Gamer and Developer, though I've never worked for Blizzard (and probably never would).
And I actually had tried a few different phrases before I settled on "troll blather" as I seriously couldn't think of a more apt phrase.
I mean, clearly you know nothing about the game, as all your evidence is third hand, you're calling it a clone of quake 3 (I'm assuming you did play quake 3? Clearly you've not played both), And just about every sentence in your post was a hyperbolic inaccuracy.
If I hadn't already posted and had mod points I would have done the exact same thing with the dropdown, but without adding anything extra.

Comment Re:Blizzard takes games seriously (Score 1) 250

No, not a trick question, a real one, I'm no expert at any sort of law. I just know that if when I sell the right to use the compiled result of code I worked on, without modification, and make that part of the contract - this would clearly impact the price - if I was selling you my source code and rights to modify it, I'd be charging - well not me, we're talking about Overwatch here, I paid $60 for my compiled non-modifiable copy, but I think the source code and rights to modify it would be easily in the millions of dollars.
Blizzard have decided to keep their project closed source and locked up, and simply sell licenses to use it that way. And Copyright law is the law that covers the rights to this I thought? So when someone hacks in, modifies the source code, and profits off it, I can see Blizz thinking the law should help protect them.
And when the whole entire driving intent it to access Blizzards game servers with these modified illegal clients, they're breaking yet more agreements and at that point they're damaging the entire overwatch playerbase. So you think there should be no legal recourse? Or is it a different legal area, like theft or digital trespassing or what? I mean I know most laws are old, and that the world today has a lot of issues the original law writers never considered, but that's not Bliz's fault is it?

Comment Re: Blizzard: Get a new business model (Score 1) 250

Black market antibiotics are made without regulation, and are one of the largest contributors to antibiotic resistance. Assuming they were making good clean helpful drugs, then they aren't like Bossland, who aren't helping.

I said anabolics, as in steroids, not antibiotics. And they're helping cheaters cheat, which is exactly what Bossland is doing.

OK, I stand corrected on antibiotics vs anabiotics/whatever they're illegally producing but it doesn't change in any way my point - black market drugs are unregulated, and untested by the proper authorities, and as such unsafe, regardless of what they are, and they were developed at great cost by a different company who would like to recoup their cost legally by selling what they developed legally, etc... so sure, nitpick all you like.
My first point stands

It's like blizzard built a carpark, charged everyone $5 to park there, then some unaffiliated company sets up out front, stops people driving in, and offers them "easy parking service" for $10, pockets the money, drives round back, in through a no-public-access service entrance, then starts parking the cars wherever they like, blocking other genuine customers parking.

In your example, you've got someone standing outside the parking garage and collecting money in the course of depriving Blizzard of sales while, at the same time, depriving Blizzard of resources they build and maintain (parking spaces). While Bossland does charge for their software, said software does not allow access to Blizzard's services without paying (Blizzard) for them, nor does it deprive "legitimate" (defined by me as someone who pays for access, thereby including users of Bossland's software; if you have another definition, let's hear it) users of access.

Bossland is using private methods of access explicitly against the ToS to give game players access to more than blizzard gave those players rights or access to, and are charging these players for this access. Blizzard's regular customers are being impacted and receiving a worse experience, bossland is making a profit off blizzard's intellectual property.

So my first point stands.

Damn straight blizzard will march out front, tell them to take off, and that if they stop breaking the lock on the private entrance and bringing cars in illegally, oh, and all that money you've been collecting, taking out of our pocket, we want restitution for that too.

They're breaking no locks, users of Bossland's software pay Blizzard for access and connect to Blizzard's servers using Blizzard's software, the same way everyone else does. They're not taking money out of Blizzard's pockets, as Blizzard is still getting paid. So there's no restitution to be had, no matter how bad Blizzard (and you) may want there to be.

They hacked into blizzard's code, and use a modified version of it to generate an overlay showing the intentionally hidden information. So yes, they've broken into overwatch. Their customers of course pay for their original copy of the game, and then pay bossland to hack it for them. Their resulting versions ruin the game for legal customers, which means that prospective legal customers will be less likely to purchase it. So yes, they have made money off blizzard's back that has resulted in blizzard losing money, the basic premise that restitution addresses.
Still failing to actually add anything pertinent to the discussion or make much sense here mate.... but lets keep going:

See what I did there?

I sure do, but I'm sure you'll see it differently.

OK, I guess you didn't so I'll explain: I laid your argument out and pointed out all the gaping holes in it, which is what you attempted to do, but failed at. Unfortunately, I used logic and reasoning, and you're too busy playing semantics and pedantics.
As such, I used your line "See what I did there?" satirically.
As I was the one writing it, and thus doing it, I know what I did there, and why I did it (as will others with decent reading comprehension, which is a surprisingly large portion of /., yourself currently excluded)
Seems it sailed over your head however, despite claims to the contrary. That's OK though, I'm not replying to you specifically for you, though you're free to benefit from it (though you clearly prefer to argue, regardless of merit)

I pointed out gaping holes in your argument.

No, you really didn't.

You keep telling yourself that. I'm sure to you I haven't, but I'm perfectly fine with that, I'm not your mother :)

Now compare bossland to the 'unaffiliated company' profiting off blizzard's infrastructure.

You mean like a 3rd-party computer repair shop or car mechanic? Those businesses actually do deprive OEM repair facilities of sales, yet they're completely legal. Meanwhile, Bossland is actually not depriving Blizzard of anything... so...

OK, Blizzard is selling "a way to compete with other people" - It's designed the game and the rules. How is someone changing the rules for a small subset of the players for their own profit in any way related to any sort of "repair facility" Bossland isn't repairing anything, it's literally doing the opposite. it's literally "breaking the game".
Seriously, your arguments (where they're actually given) are getting worse and worse here.

See everyone else's point yet?

Funny you should ask, I was just in the middle of answering. No.

It's OK, you didn't need to answer, we all know where your head is, and what you can see from there :)

Comment Re: Maybe they should work harder at cheat-proofin (Score 1) 250

I think that went over your head... Try reading the post again - keyword "imagine"...

Personally I think he* is partially right, the DMCA and associated shit shouldn't be used for something like this. If a game developer have a persistent world where money transactions are involved (subscription fees should be enough) they should also be required to make cheats and security intrusions (almost**) impossible. Maybe not to the degree that they should be considered banks but something close to that would be logical. Many hacks in games are due to a fundamentally fucked up development environment, hacking instead of developing mostly due to pressures to deliver something rather than deliver something working.

(* sexist, most likely true) (** given the current state of art for programming almost impossible is the best possible level of security)

OK, do me a favour, and remember that Blizzard is a for-profit company. Done that? Good. Now try to take the perspective of someone trying to ensure this company continues to profit. A little tougher? Got it yet? Good. OK, so now, you tell your devs you want "almost impossible" security, but to still make a profit. This is where you might imagine a kindly dev pointing out that there's this thing called "diminishing returns" that applies particularly well here, and they tell you that with the budget allowed, they've got as close to "almost impossible" as they can already. Getting "closer" will mean spending significantly more time (exponentially, actually) and turn those profits inside out. Now pretend you want to keep your job, and go hire a lawyer to stop these thieves like every other company in a similar situation does.

Comment Re: Maybe they should work harder at cheat-proofin (Score 1) 250

>"Oh, that's your son? Well doing what your son has been doing is actually against your ISP's TOS....they could cancel your service."

And that would be an actionable lie. So yeah, that's retarded.

Blizzard needs to allow private dedicated servers like games used to have. They don't like that, so they should have to deal with the resulting fallout.

Yeah, I'm also pissed that microsoft won't let me host my own copy of Win Server 2012 as I like. They claim it's their intellectual property or some such crap. So unfair I can't use all their hard work for myself however I like, and even profit off it myself.
It's like some people think if I want to have my own game server I should have to build my own game server, or find one someone is happy and willing to sell me, and pay for that.
And don't forget, having my own dedicated modifiable server would allow me to help fragment the playerbase, and subvert the in game expectations of players, so that fair competition (the single core purpose of the software) is unachievable.

Comment Re: Maybe they should work harder at cheat-proofi (Score 1) 250

How is it the manufacturer's fault for not writing perfect code? Writing perfect code is really hard and expensive. It's a game, not an investment bank.

^This
Assuming writing "perfect code" was even possible (It's not), and assuming this would be a base requirement for producing an enjoyable game (It's not) the investment required would mean you'd be paying more for your copy of Overwatch than you did for your car, which (I assume) relatively few would be willing to do.
So our options here are threefold:
1) stop making software, as it can't be perfect.
2) assume everyone is/will cheat, and make it part of the game (then it wouldn't be overwatch or competitive or enjoyable - again noone would buy it or play it)
3) Use whatever legal resources are available to protect your intellectual property and prosecute those who both devalue _and_ profit off of your work

I know which one I'd pick.

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Stinginess with privileges is kindness in disguise. -- Guide to VAX/VMS Security, Sep. 1984

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