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Comment Re:Logic Says It Should Be Legal (Score 1) 396

Actually believe it or not I’m less scared of a syringe than an autoinjector. Why? Because in the Army we were issued an autoinjector in case of exposure to some kind of gas (I don’t remember which one) which you were supposed to inject into the muscle in your butt cheek. The scary part was how I saw one of these stick right through a 2x4 piece of wood. Imagine if you accidentally stuck your hip bone or your handowwI’ll stick with the syringe, thanks.

A single autoinjector? It was probably the ATNAA (Antidote Treatment Nerve Agent Auto-Injector). If it was a pair of them in a black sleeve, it was the Mk.1 NAAK (Nerve Agent Antidote Kit). You may have gotten a third, with diazepam, to be used to treat seizures long enough to stick the atropine and pralidoxime chloride into the victim, if they were convulsing.

The reason they give you autoinjectors, though, is because under stress fine motor skills evaporate, leaving you with gross motor skills. Using a syringe is a fine motor skill, and trying to do that while your adrenaline is spiked, you’re starting to convulse, and you’ve got a needle phobia? Sorry, you’re going to die. The military spends money on kit when the cheap gear doesn’t cut the mustard, so I’m inclined to think they switched to autoinjectors for a reason.

Comment Re: Mindshare (Score 1) 147

I applaud you for not wasting the environment, but it is certainly not thanks to Apple. Credit where credit is due, and here it is to you. I also believe on average, iphone users keep their phones for a shorter time as they see their phones as fashion accessories (this is only a feeling of mine, I have no hard data supporting it).

In my experience, most people I know tend to use their iPhones into the ground, often ending up 3 or 4 generations behind. Except for the one guy who attends WWDC every year, and makes a good living as an IT contractor, and also has to be able to test his code against new hardware. Everyone else uses it until it breaks, or they pass on their old one to someone else when theirs breaks, and use the excuse to upgrade.

Comment Re:Idiotic Argument (Score 1) 394

Palo Alto's "Cubik" series is a good example. I use them because they're beautiful, well-designed, and sound _very_ good for what I paid for them. They hide the screws as part of a mid century modern aesthetic, and because they don't want to pay to fix speakers that you fucked up. Relying on USB-only audio devices is a questionable decision, but my headset is like that, too - a Logitech G35. Unlike newer modules, the DAC isn't even in the cord, it's inside the tamper-evident screws. Why? Because after passing through the rat's nest of cable behind my desk, analog audio sounds like crap. With digital signaling, either there's enough signal, or there isn't, and I can imagine no circumstances where, with this cable length, the audio won't be bit-perfect when it hits the speakers.

These replaced the very-much-analog Klipsch speakers which were fiddly, fragile, and prone to loose connections because "clip a wire to it" has some downsides to match its advantages.

Comment Re:Who first used a Robot for Murder? (Score 1) 983

I always thought it should be feasible to get "dead or alive" warrants by bench-trial-in-absentia in the time it took SWAT to kit up, in order to provide legal oversight of such decisions. I'm disappointed that nobody with power shares my idea.

Still, any and every time SWAT is brought in to neutralize a threat before bystanders get dead, that's exactly what police have been asked to do. The only difference is that this time an improvised guided missile was used, instead of a hit-squad with submachine guns and hollowpoint bullets.

Comment Re:Really? (Score 1) 983

Strictly speaking, it will probably end up more accurately described as a guided missile strike - they probably need a new robot now.

As for tomorrow, I suspect the future includes anti-personnel guided missiles - the moral equivalent of an offensive hand grenade or breaching charge, delivered from up to 2 km away. Alternately, they could be purely kinetic energy weapons like the EXACTO laser-guided .50 bullet. Consider a thermos full of cement hitting someone faster than a .45 ACP slug - there will be quite a mess.

http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app4/spike.html

http://www.raytheon.com/capabilities/products/pike/

http://defense-update.com/photos/mini_spike.html

Such mini-missiles are designed for operating in urban terrain with minimal collateral damage, and low prices - the DRS Spike is designed to cost only $4000 a missile and $6000 for the command launch unit. Other missiles in the class are designed to be extremely inexpensive, as well.

I can practically guarantee these will make their way to future war-zone hellholes because the price is right, but I’ll be pleasantly surprised to see these stay out of SWAT arsenals until they have a legitimate need to crack open combat cyborgs. I'd be shocked if police snipers didn't end up using EXACTO bullets, though - it's a lot like what they already do, but more precise.

Comment Re:Removable storage that never gets removed (Score 1) 221

I know, right? That constant cavalcade of intractable security breaches requiring the replacement of perfectly good hardware, since either it’s a hardware bug (cough Qualcom cough) or just because promised software updates to patch things like Heartbleed never materialize, and with, at last estimate, thousands of malicious Google Play apps spreading rootkits, I can see how easy it is to get raped. I mean, if my alternative is paying $2/GB for flash memory, well, it’s cheaper than even the least expensive of identity fraud.

Hang on, you were talking about getting raped by Apple.

Comment Re: If this is correct it should be easy to chec (Score 1) 299

In a nuclear rocket, the fuel and the reaction mass are two different components, and the fuel is likely to outlast the reaction mass by a massive margin, due to the nature of criticality - without enough fuel, the engine won’t work at all, so we tend to massively overfuel nuclear anything compared to the mission’s actual energy needs.

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