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Comment Re:Yet another ignorant troll (Score 2) 198

The reason for the Senate and Electoral college is to protect against tyranny by a minority of states with a higher population against a majority of states with less population.

You're absolutely correct. Damn those tyrants in California for believing their vote should count the same as the vote of any other American. They need to learn that in America the rights don't belong to humans, and we're not all equal before the law. Rights belong to abstract constructs, like corporations or states or, if you're a republican, bank accounts.

To make this clear, what do you think about formalizing it? How about making the votes of people from highly populated states only count as 3/5 of the votes of real Americans? I'm sure you'll find good precedents if you crack open this history book you mention.

Comment Re:Easy fix (Score 1) 85

Most people will buy whatever they see that is attractively packaged on the front page of Amazon or on the shelves at Home Depot, Target, Best Buy, Office Max or the like.

Heck, even on Slashdot, where you'd expect people to be better informed and more concerned about privacy, lots of posters still have gmail addresses, Android phones (with location services enabled, no less) and use Google search and docs.

Comment Re: Lets elect them to be president of the US (Score 1, Insightful) 110

Perfect description of Obama.

Man, I have seen idiocy before, but this takes the cake. The problem with Obama was that he was not vindictive at all - on the contrary, he went much too far in trying to mend fences with the Republicans. After the catastrophe of the Bush administration, what the country needed was a cleansing. The guilty parties (most of the Bush administration, and at least half of the Republicans in Congress) should have been investigated - and many of them should have ended up in jail for lying through their teeth, wasting trillions of dollars, dragging the country into two wars and costing the lives of thousands of Americans, putting loyalty above aptitude, doubling the deficit, and so many other sins. Republicans needed to be slapped hard - it would have saved America lots of pain and suffering since.

Instead, Obama chose not to prosecute any of the Republican malefactors. He was willing to let bygones be bygones, he tried to build consensus, to have a dialogue. He even adopted Republican policies - even Obamacare was based on Mitt Romney's weaker design, to make it palatable to Republicans.

And, after all this effort you call *him* vindictive? I mean, as an obvious Trump supporter, you probably have only a tenuous connection to reality, but really, are you so far gone you can't even understand the meaning of "truth" anymore?

Comment Re:What happens next? (Score 2) 197

The US can then open its cities to more open telco network builds

I'm not sure which US you're talking about - the one I live in, led by conservatives, passes laws forbidding cities to compete with telcos. When the FCC tries to stop states from enacting such regulation (though of course, when enacted by Republicans it's not called regulation - rolls eyes), conservative states - specifically North Carolina and Tennessee - sue and win the right to block municipal broadband via regulation (sorry, via "competition enhancing legislation").

Comment Re:Is Microsoft really the one to give orders? (Score 4, Interesting) 171

I don't think listening to device makers is always the best way to go. Until a couple of years ago the Windows computer hardware field was stale, with hardly any innovation. Most makers were engaged in a race to the bottom, trying to pump out the cheapest machine they could, while a few others, like Alienware, were looking at niche areas, like machines optimized for gaming. Microsoft had to jump in with the Surface line, which gave device makers quite a kick in the pants. The new line was quite successful, and it revitalized the field.

Comment Re:Well there is a little problem (Score 1) 158

George W. has been out of office for eight years. Time to let go and move on.

Yeah, very Republican answer that. Of course it's time to let it go - it was just a war based on lies, only hundreds of thousands of lives lost and trillions of dollars wasted. Not a serious issue, like Pizzagate or Benghazi. And reviewing how we got in such a bad situation, shining a light on the mistakes or bad intentions of the actors, and maybe fixing some issues in the process isn't important to America. What's important is to make sure under no circumstances would the party be put in a bad light.

Comment Re:Well there is a little problem (Score 1) 158

That's a big problem for the Republicans.

Why would it be a problem? It's not like Republicans have done anything good for America in the last twenty years or more, and they still got elected. There is no requirement for responsibility in the Republican party. Their strategy for elections is not to deliver solutions, to solve problems - or even to address them. They don't need to. They have instead perfected the art of divide et impera. They whip their voters in a frenzy over all kinds of crazy or made up bullshit, confuse all discussions, blame their own sins on the Democrats and lie, lie, lie and lie again.

See how Bush the second got reelected after some of the most catastrophic policy decisions in the last fifty years. Did Republican politicians care? I haven't heard any of them ask for a review or an independent commission to investigate how and why the whole Iraq debacle happened. I guess for Republicans independent investigators should only be used for important things, like spots on a dress, not for trivial stuff like a war. Did Republican voters care? No, they were distracted with "flip-flopping" and swift boats. I mean, for them it's more important that Kerry changed their mind once or twice than that Bush and his administration created a casus belli out of whole cloth, caused the whole Middle East crisis we're still going through now and cost the lives of thousands of Americans and who knows how many others in the process.

Comment Re:Just like the DNC an GOP (Score 1) 321

The Left will vote for what they consider the lesser of two evils

Of course, only "The Left" do that. Shouldn't you at least attempt to appear to challenge your own biases from time to time?
 

No, he's correct - history shows us the Right will consistently vote for the greater of two evils.

Comment Re:until IE 10 broke it (Score 0) 300

Your post is just another case of rabid anti-Microsoftism leading to reverse logic. The standard you mention has been written by Google and their pet browser company, Mozilla, so of course it says the default preference should be to allow ads. That's deeply wrong and anti-consumer (but pro-ad companies).

There has been a lot of discussion on Slashdot and everywhere else about opt-in versus opt-out - and the consensus is that opt-in is the correct choice in pretty much all cases. By default, users should always be opted out of things that infringe their privacy. Exactly the same here: only if they specifically opt in should they be tracked. Well, IE does this correctly. Not knowing about do not track (or not being technically savvy enough to disable it) IS NOT AN OPT IN, and people who do want to be a product can disable the do-not-track flag.

Of course, Yahoo and Google profit from the vast number of users who don't know about the intricacies of the do not track standards and options. The fact remains that those users did not specifically opt in, and their privacy is abused. The standard is broken (I believe intentionally), so don't try to make it sound like it's somehow Microsoft's fault.

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