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Comment Re:Sweet (Score 1) 286

Try 3 at that demo program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>

#define bool 2
#define vector vector<int> test // Insert almost anything here, use trailing \ if necessary

int main() {
std::vector[bool];

test[0][0] = 1;
test[1][0] = 2;
printf("%d %d\n", test[0][0], test[1][0]);

return(1);
}

Comment Re:Sweet (Score 1) 286

The beauty of C++ is that std::vector[bool] can be almost anything. See below:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>

#define bool 2
#define vector vector test // Insert almost anything here, use trailing \ if necessary

int main() {
std::vector[bool];

test[0][0] = 1;
test[1][0] = 2;
printf("%d %d\n", test[0][0], test[1][0]);

return(1);
}

I wish I didn't know enough of C++ to write the above ...

Comment Re:Sorry but that's the normal behaviorostost (Score 1) 924

You don't want your long-running processes to have root privileges. It's a massive security hole. Many of the Linux daemons for server use run on less than root privileges (Apache, MySQL, etc).

A better approach would have been to have a group that had the ability to make processes run after logout. That would be a security improvement, since you could then determine which users had the rights to have persistent processes.

This is change overturns about 40 years of Linux/Unix computer history. The concept of nohup is used everywhere in Linux server land, and breaking that programming idiom will have significant ramifications.

Comment Re:Not impressed by IoT efforts so far (Score 1) 153

The issue with Edison and Galileo is that they tend to be crippled platforms. It's been a while since I last looked at them, but I always ask the same questions. Does it have Ethernet? WiFi? 5V/3.3V serial port? Bunch of pins for miscellaneous I/O? SATA port or SD card? Enough RAM to run a standard version of Linux? HDMI and keyboard ports for testing?

The latest Raspberry Pi has most of that. However, there always seems to be a catch with Intel products. Intel doesn't want the Edison or Galileo to compete in the PC market, and as a result, they are crippled platforms.

Comment Re:"May Have" Struck a Drone (Score 1) 401

Birds fly towards your car because it boosts lift and windspeed. The car generates a huge aerodynamic wake, both in front and behind the vehicle. The birds are taking advantage of this fast moving air. It is a clever piece of aerodynamics. However, the margin of failure on the manoeuvre is frighteningly small.

Comment Re: It's been a while since I was a CS student. (Score 2) 173

We're expecting these CS graduates to go fourth and do something, ...

Historically, universities were about perpetuating knowledge and the advancement of knowledge. Apprenticeships and professional programs are where people learn do to something practical. Universities were the hallowed halls of pure learning.

In the beginning, no one foresaw that a pure math specialization would have huge practical use. Some of the greats in computer science never thought their work would ever see use outside of the math department. If memory serves, Bool was extremely pleased that Boolean Algebra existed as a theoretical exercise that would never have a practical application.

Comment Re:People say "custom-made" like it's a bad thing (Score 1) 474

RS-232 has done quite well.

However, it was a horribly defined standard. They defined voltage levels and pins, but nothing about the data packet. Everyone settled on an old-style TTY packet, and then experimented with parity, stop bits, and baud rate. Hardware flow control wasn't properly defined either. Intel made an 8251 chip that would chop-off messages mid-byte if the hardware flow-control lines were used.

Comment Re:How is this not win/win (Score 1) 663

The only way a gun protects you is if the assassin misses the first time.

And, in the midst of the confusion, you correctly identify, shoot and hit the assassin before he tries again.

Of course, shooting and hitting the assassin assumes your marksmanship with a handgun is better than his, when he might have a rifle.

Comment Re:I don't get it (Score 1) 170

The American's and the British had it in WWII on the bombers. Before that, I'm sure someone can find an example of a planes from the 20's, and maybe even from WWI that had an omni-directional gun turret.

A big issue in the early fighters was that they couldn't figure out how to fire forward. The ammunition was unreliable, and if you tried to fire through the propeller blades, it would shoot off the propellers. In the early years, this was solved by adding "wedges" to the props such that if the ammo hit the prop, it wouldn't destroy the propeller.

The early aircraft would have also investigated alternative designs, including omni-directional gun turrets, and sending a guy up in the air with a rifle or sub-machine gun.

Comment Re:Wayland, Rust, Servo, Perl 6, Diaspora (Score 4, Insightful) 120

Replacing X is a big project. Sometimes it takes a while to generate something good.

I'm not sure anyone has a good model for handling rewrites of massive projects. The experiences of KDE 4.0 and Gnome 3.0 come to mind. Eventually, they were better, but it takes some time with a massive upgrade like that.

The other issue is that User's often have a very good idea of what they don't like. However, bulimic criticism does not help to refine a software product. It just splits the ecosystem. Ultimately the user's need to use their computer, and the new software just isn't ready. So the developer's and user's go in different directions.

Closed source isn't the solution either: with Windows 8, Microsoft split it's ecosystem. Windows 10 hasn't fixed the split (yet).

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