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Comment Blender (Score 1) 151

And what percent of GTX 1080 users need their Blender to render faster?

Yeah. So, having more cores helps speed the render. The latest Blender does support Pascal. It's very fast. But your real limiting factor here is how much of the scene can you fit into the card's memory? Because if you exceed total memory capacity of the card, you'll be rendering on your system CPU.

A Titan X Pascal ships with 12GB RAM and a few more rendering cores. Compared to GTX 1080TI at 11GB, it's a marginal difference for a whopping $600 savings. So, if you're rendering 3D photorealistic in Cycles, your question is, will that 1GB difference really matter? Because if not, you'll want to buy a second GTX1080 for a bit more than one Titan X Pascal, and you'll blow a single card away in rendering times. Or buy four of them for less than 2.5x the price of two Titan Xs.

For 2D cartoons, you'll see some benefit in Blender using planes and onion skinning. But not with OpenToonz, which really doesn't have extensive GL acceleration yet. So choose hardware carefully to the projects you expect will pay the bills.

Who in their right mind does this? Pro animators, it's not just film but also advertising and motion design for web. Or architects, who often shoot proposed sites with a drone and then use a 3D model with motion tracking to composite them together for clients.

So, when you're paid by the project, each extra hour of rendertime really matters. And easily justifies a few extra thousand dollars in hardware.

Comment Re:the pizza claims are bogus. (Score 1) 414

Frozen pizzas, made in a factory, on a huge production line. I'd imagine that they'd taste even better if you grabbed one before it's frozen and finish cooking it up.

The ability to prepare one using fresh ingredients and pre-cook on site in a space more 'restaurant' sized than 'factory' sized helps for the 'fresh' market. They can be closer to the customers, even if they ultimately produce fewer pizzas per square meter of factory space. You then finish cooking during delivery lets people get a 'superior' pizza, freshness wise. Though I'm disappointed in the level of automation. If they could have a robot making dough, spreading cheese and ingredients, then they'd be there, I think. The last would be switching to a self-driving delivery truck that finishes slicing and boxing the pizza that just came out of the oven moments before delivery.

Comment Re:Michael Flynn Jr believes it (Score 1) 789

You're right about one thing: the rest of the country does prefer the friendly simpleton, or even the crude simpleton, to the "smart man/woman". I certainly do, and without apologies.

Is there any reply you could give to the question "why would you do that" that wouldn't make you sound kind of gay for Trump?

Comment Re:Michael Flynn Jr believes it (Score 1) 789

Oh lord you're like 15 years too late.

Our heads asploded when half of the country stood up and said they'd prefer the friendly simpleton over the dull smart man. To lead them. You're waiting for some colossal rage event at the election of a troll, but this is exactly what we expected from you.

tl;dr "idiot does something idiotic" isn't news

Comment Re: Hell no (Score 1) 381

“Computer Science is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes.” - commonly attributed to Edsger Dijkstra, but disputed.

I have sometimes compared those who have studied computer science (as opposed to learning how to program) with those who have studied music. You can be a very successful programmer without any computer science just as you can be a very successful musician without music theory. Mastery of the advanced studies of your discipline will make you a better than merely someone who can just get the job done.

Comment finally, 30 bit color panels (Score 2) 108

I have confirmed that 30-Bit color is working on a 27-inch iMac. A 16-Bit greyscale ramp was used to test. Applications which support this capability are quite sparse. At the time of my testing Preview worked and Pixelmator did not. It is likely that applications need to optin to use this feature. The standard 24-Bit pipeline is indicated with Pixel Depth: 32-Bit Color (ARGB8888). New 30-Bit color pipelines will show Pixel Depth: 30-Bit Color (ARGB2101010) or Pixel Depth: CGSThirtyBitColor. I have also been able to get 30-Bit color working on my Dell U2713H via DisplayPort. Support seemed sparse and intermittent in earlier versions, but as of 10.11.3 everything works well in my experience.

http://www.astramael.com/

The apple website notes these LG panels are P3 color gamut compliant. Which is a smaller color space than Adobe RGB, but probably sufficient for 10bit per channel. While the OS has supported 10 bit since a recent update to El Capitan, there are almost no Mac applications that make use of this. Unlike on Windows, where 10 bit color support and display panels have been available for several years. And note, the latest MacBook Pro panel still doesn't support real 10 bit. And if you want to use wide color with a secondary panel, you'll need to buy a laptop with a secondary GPU.

On the PC side, it's much easier to get the right hardware and get Adobe tools to display a wide color space. Apple is still far behind on what has become absolutely necessary for photographers and filmmakers.

Comment Re:Good and bad exposures (Score 1) 475

This is exactly right. Daniel Ellsberg broke the law by photocopying and smuggling out classified documents about Vietnam War progress (or lack thereof) from the RAND corporation, where he was an a Ph.D military analyst. He provided those documents to the reporters from New York Times and Washington Post. The Nixon Administration filed an emergency injunction with the Supreme Court to suppress immanent publication by the New York Times. But the Supreme Court refused on the grounds doing so would imperil the first amendment by imposing court mandated prior restraint. See: New York Times v United States.

Now that does not mean Ellsberg could not have been prosecuted under the Espionage Act of 1919. He absolutely broke the law and admitted as such. He was an employee with a high security clearance entrusted to prevent the release of those documents. Not steal and release them. The justice department ultimately refused to prosecute. But as we've seen with the Bush and Obama Administrations, Espionage Act investigations and prosecutions are popular these days.

Just how the US Government plans to prosecute Assange under the Espionage Act is unclear. He's a non-citizen who never signed a US security clearance nor took an oath to protect classified materials. Furthermore, Wikileaks is arguably a journalistic endeavor. The government makes no distinction between official journalists and citizen journalists for first amendment protections. If the New York Times can do it, so can Julian Assange. And if they argue he's not a citizen and therefore not protected under the first amendment, how then can they argue as a non citizen he's bound by the US Espionage Act?

Perhaps a real lawyer can chime up here. I just took a grad media law class. But it sure seems like tortured logic to me.

Comment Re:Where's my new MacPro Tower? (Score 1) 114

I know a guy who hacked his old 2009 Pro tower with two new xeons and a Titan X just to give the thing a bit more life. Made it a pretty good machine performance wise and he didn't have to throw away his old software investment. But he's already transitioning off mac, so this was to keep an old tool chain functional.

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