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Comment Who is this for? (Score 1) 152

There are people who will buy the cheapest accessory because they don't know better.

There are people who buy the premium/OEM accessory because they do know better.

The former group are not going to shell out coin for a power meter they likely won't even understand the meaning of. Feel free to argue that it's about education, but look how prevalent email and phone scams are some 10 years after they arrived. Don't know about you folks, but I'm kind of over getting told I'm a paranoid freak because people don't like to hear they're wrong.

The latter group will never need it because they know to avoid cheap Chinese crap to begin with. Nevermind I can find USB2 equivalents with a quick google search. This is not some ground breaking product.

Who is this device for, why are we discussing it, and why did we not discuss the USB 2 versions when they came out 18 months ago? This all reeks of product shilling IMO.

Comment Re:Wait what? (Score 1) 143

Ya know, I completely misread the piece. Two of four bearings failed, implying two shafts, not four. That's what I get for R'ing TFA. Durp.

But again, if one seal per shaft blew (presumably, the one at the water side, which implies poor design as the Navy have seen leaks in this area before) that's both shafts out. You'd guess the AIMs are set up so if their current consumption hit a certain threshold the system would assume a stalled motor and cut supply, so not matter how the bearings failed, it was likely to trip something.

Perhaps is *should* have four driveshafts?

Comment Re:Wait what? (Score 1) 143

It's not entirely clear if it's the AIMs that failed, or if something else sized up the shafts first.

The article states that two of four bearings on the driveshaft(s) that connect the AIMs to the propulsion system (reads, gearbox and screws) failed due to water ingress. If that's two shafts per propulsion set (AIM, gears and screws) and one on each side blew, then yeah, thats going to put you dead in the water.

What is not clear is if there are multiple shafts that can load balance AIM torque across to the propulsion set equally, or two shafts per AIM, each going to a port and starboard gearbox/screw. Whats even less clear is the redundancy. In either of the above setups there is at least two shafts available, why can't these things make it home on one shaft if the system was indeed supposed to be redundant? Even a stanking old B-47 can limp home on one.

Comment Re:This doesn't make sense. (Score 1) 216

..Until such a time as the compounds and materials that garbage is made from starts to decompose down to their basic elements (like heavy metals, dioxins and other nasties) due to erosive, UV and other breakdown processes, at which time it becomes, you guessed it, toxic waste. Or are you still under the infantile presumption that all the things in the world are made from rainbows and unicorn shit as opposed to chemicals and capitalism?

Comment Re: Surely a fundamental human rights breach? (Score 1, Redundant) 796

This counterargument is bad. You need to stop parroting this quote.

The framing of this counterargument accepts the basic premise that the only people who have something to hide are "bad people", and that if you're not a bad person then you won't have anything to hide.

You need to engage with this presumption that the only people who have something to encrypt are pedophiles.

The best free speech analogy is not this "hurr I have nothing to say" retarded horse shit, but a defense of hate speech on the basis that the sword that defends good free speech (political dissent, etc...) must necessarily defend objectionable speech. This context means that, yeah, pedophiles use encryption, and we object to that, but we can't defend our need to encrypt things we all agree need to be encrypted without also defending pedophiles.

And that's a shitty trade-off and we all feel bad about it, but it's not ambiguous or up for debate; there's no way we can evaluate this ethical dilemma and end up putting the prosecution of pedophiles and terrorists ahead of our own encryption needs.

Comment Re: Surely a fundamental human rights breach? (Score 4, Insightful) 796

This counterargument is bad. You need to stop repeating this quote.

The framing of this counterargument accepts the basic premise that the only people who have something to hide are "bad people", and that if you're not a bad person then you won't have anything to hide.

You need to engage with and defeat this presumption that the only people who have something to encrypt are pedophiles.

The best free speech analogy is not this "hurr I have nothing to say" retarded horse shit, but a defense of hate speech on the basis that the sword that defends good free speech (political dissent, etc...) must necessarily defend objectionable speech. This context means that, yeah, pedophiles use encryption, and we object to that, but we can't defend our need to encrypt things we all agree need to be encrypted without also defending pedophiles. And that's a shitty trade-off and we all feel bad about it, but it's not ambiguous or up for debate; there's no way we can evaluate this ethical dilemma and end up putting the prosecution of pedophiles and terrorists ahead of our own encryption needs.

Submission + - City installs traffic lights in sidewalk for smartphone users (washingtonpost.com)

tlhIngan writes: It's finally happened — the smartphone zombies are here. The German city of Augsburg installed traffic lights in the sidewalk so smartphone users don't have to look up. Apparently people are so addicted to their smartphones they can't be bothered to look up at traffic signals, so embedding them in the ground they don't have to.

Submission + - Monaco-based Oil Company Unaoil Raided by Police (theage.com.au)

iONiUM writes: On the heels of this week's article on widespread corruption in the oil industry, today the Monaco-based oil company Unaoil and also the homes of its executives were raided by police.

From the article: "Fairfax Media revealed on Thursday that the British police had teamed up with the Australian Federal Police, the US Department of Justice and the FBI to investigate the vast cache of emails on which our stories have been based."

It has now also been revealed that Hyundai, Samsung, Sinopec and Petronas were also involved. However, outside of Australian media (and Slashdot), there has been no reporting at all of these events.

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