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Comment Re:This doesn't make sense. (Score 1) 216

..Until such a time as the compounds and materials that garbage is made from starts to decompose down to their basic elements (like heavy metals, dioxins and other nasties) due to erosive, UV and other breakdown processes, at which time it becomes, you guessed it, toxic waste. Or are you still under the infantile presumption that all the things in the world are made from rainbows and unicorn shit as opposed to chemicals and capitalism?

Comment Re: Surely a fundamental human rights breach? (Score 1, Redundant) 796

This counterargument is bad. You need to stop parroting this quote.

The framing of this counterargument accepts the basic premise that the only people who have something to hide are "bad people", and that if you're not a bad person then you won't have anything to hide.

You need to engage with this presumption that the only people who have something to encrypt are pedophiles.

The best free speech analogy is not this "hurr I have nothing to say" retarded horse shit, but a defense of hate speech on the basis that the sword that defends good free speech (political dissent, etc...) must necessarily defend objectionable speech. This context means that, yeah, pedophiles use encryption, and we object to that, but we can't defend our need to encrypt things we all agree need to be encrypted without also defending pedophiles.

And that's a shitty trade-off and we all feel bad about it, but it's not ambiguous or up for debate; there's no way we can evaluate this ethical dilemma and end up putting the prosecution of pedophiles and terrorists ahead of our own encryption needs.

Comment Re: Surely a fundamental human rights breach? (Score 4, Insightful) 796

This counterargument is bad. You need to stop repeating this quote.

The framing of this counterargument accepts the basic premise that the only people who have something to hide are "bad people", and that if you're not a bad person then you won't have anything to hide.

You need to engage with and defeat this presumption that the only people who have something to encrypt are pedophiles.

The best free speech analogy is not this "hurr I have nothing to say" retarded horse shit, but a defense of hate speech on the basis that the sword that defends good free speech (political dissent, etc...) must necessarily defend objectionable speech. This context means that, yeah, pedophiles use encryption, and we object to that, but we can't defend our need to encrypt things we all agree need to be encrypted without also defending pedophiles. And that's a shitty trade-off and we all feel bad about it, but it's not ambiguous or up for debate; there's no way we can evaluate this ethical dilemma and end up putting the prosecution of pedophiles and terrorists ahead of our own encryption needs.

Submission + - City installs traffic lights in sidewalk for smartphone users (washingtonpost.com)

tlhIngan writes: It's finally happened — the smartphone zombies are here. The German city of Augsburg installed traffic lights in the sidewalk so smartphone users don't have to look up. Apparently people are so addicted to their smartphones they can't be bothered to look up at traffic signals, so embedding them in the ground they don't have to.

Submission + - Monaco-based Oil Company Unaoil Raided by Police (theage.com.au)

iONiUM writes: On the heels of this week's article on widespread corruption in the oil industry, today the Monaco-based oil company Unaoil and also the homes of its executives were raided by police.

From the article: "Fairfax Media revealed on Thursday that the British police had teamed up with the Australian Federal Police, the US Department of Justice and the FBI to investigate the vast cache of emails on which our stories have been based."

It has now also been revealed that Hyundai, Samsung, Sinopec and Petronas were also involved. However, outside of Australian media (and Slashdot), there has been no reporting at all of these events.

Submission + - Two Loud Explosions Hit Brussels Airport

jones_supa writes: At least one person has been killed and several injured after two explosions crunched through Zaventem Airport in Brussels, Belgium. Shots were fired and Arabic shouted before the blasts, suggesting a terrorist attack. Video and images on social media showed smoke rising from an airport building and shattered windows. Confused and shocked passengers fled the terminal to safety as they were evacuated by armed police. Footage showed rubbish littered across the floor. All traffic from and to the airport has been suspended. The airport is monitoring the situation closely and will deliver further announcements in Twitter.

Submission + - GPS Jammer Hunting with a UAV

An anonymous reader writes: The JAGER Drone (Jammer Acquisition with GPS Exploration & Reconnaissance) is a fully autonomous, unmanned aerial vehicle system for locating GPS jammers. The jamming of the GPS satellite signal by ground-based transmitter represents a grave threat to airplanes, maritime shipping, law enforcement, farming, mining, surveying, and even package delivery. Cheap jamming devices are available on the Internet under $25 and mostly used to defeat company vehicle's GPS tracker to hide your location from boss. Ultimately, the JAGER drone design team targets the ability to locate multiple, simultaneous jammers, and navigate in intermittent GPS and GPS-denied environments using a combination of GPS and alternate navigation aids. The JAGER system is built from commercially available or open-source parts and software.

Submission + - Facebook's being investigated for operating as a cartel (thenextweb.com)

longestnameavailable writes: Facebook is currently under investigation in Germany for violating monopoly laws, but the social network only risks fines and possible orders that could ultimately have it changing specific features to better comply with local requirements. Facebook has already been fined 100,000 EUR in Germany for "its failure to properly inform users about ownership of the content they post on the site."

Comment Re:And how do I make a call? (Score 4, Informative) 84

From TFA.

The kiosks, in addition to supporting encrypted Wi-Fi connectivity for hundreds of HotSpot 2.0-enabled devices within 150 feet of them, will each include two USB charging ports, a red 911 button to contact emergency services

a red 911 button to contact emergency services

Don't you think that just maybe a little detail like that might have been covered..?

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