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Comment They actually want to kick appliances off. (Score 4, Insightful) 154

They actually want to kick appliances off. When the load is high, your blender quits working, basically.

They actually mean "the equivalent of adding a gas-fired power plant by subtracting users who can damn well wait for their smoothies.

Hopefully no one is stupid enough to buy a Nest dialysis machine...

Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 112

Also, there is caching, and also, some loads are heavy on longish FPU operations.

So... it doesn't quite work out that way. Also, multicore designs can have separate memory.

One example of multicore design that's both interesting and functional are the various vector processor graphics cores. Lots of em in there; and they get to do a lot of useful work you couldn't really do any other way with similar clock speeds and process tech.

Comment Re:Solution: Buy legislators. All of them. (Score 1) 189

You cherry pick the bad ones.

Well, I cherry picked the high end devices, yes -- because they were sold claiming the feature sets that were compelling. Now, the fact that those feature sets were incomplete, and/or buggy, and/or mischaracterized... that's something I didn't pick. But it's been very consistent, and the higher end the device, the more consistent it's been.

It just sounds like you do business with shitty companies.

Well, Canon for the camera. Marantz for the pre-pro. Kenwood for the radio. I totally agree they are shitty companies. And they won't be getting any more of my money. It's not like I can't learn.

The bottom line is, these devices have, and were sold trumpeting, the mechanisms that would allow them to be fixed and/or improved. They aren't fixed, and they surely aren't improved in any significant way. I'm just reporting it, and drawing a general (and accurate) conclusion about considering "network upgradable" to be anything more than marketing hype.

You don't like what I'm saying, okay, more power to you. I'm still saying it, though. And I'm still right, so there's that. :)

Comment Re:As the phone company, I fail to see... (Score 1) 189

But yet Apple does it all the time. So does Google if you bought a Nexus directly from them. Why can't the rest?

Apple does it because you are still incentivized to buy a new iPhone every 18 months, and probably lust after it in a shorter period than that.

Google can update the nexus because it's usually a "bring your own device, off contract" thing. I.e. you bought it without a plan by paying for it up front, and in exchange you get updates and the ability to do exactly the thing carriers don't want you to be able to do: switch carriers. So they charge more on the plan, and you pay maybe 30% of the extra amount (say $10 a month instead of $30 a month to get a subsidized over 18 months iPhone thrown into the deal).

The rest can't do it because you aren't willing to pay full cost for their phones up front, because frankly, the phones are crap compared to an iPhone or a Google Nexus. The only way you can sell them at all is on a subsidy plan, which suits the carriers just fine, since that gets you locked into the contract.

They tolerate Apple, because as long as they keep coming out with new shiny, people put on the contract handcuffs voluntarily.

They tolerate Google because they tolerate "bring your own device" as a marketing means of providing the illusion of choice, when they know that only a tiny minority is going to exercise that choice. If everyone started paying cash up front for their phones so they could go month to month, the carriers would come unglued, since they only axis they'd have available to compete on would be service.

Comment Re:uranium runs out (Score 1) 319

Yeah, that's still an issue. Except...you're running your laundry on a timer now.

The models you listed on that link do not have start timers. Electronic controls, yes; but without timers, all that means is you can't mechanically set a setting, and then have a timer power the thing on at a specific time. Nor do they have protocol based external management, so you could trigger them at a particular solar generating level that's sustained over a period of time to avoid using grid power, and program a (much smarter) external system to run them.

These appliances are not as smart as they'd need to be, and even if they are, they're not smart in the right direction, nor are the external control management systems there yet for doing things like coordinating the dishwasher vs. the laundry.

Just have it set to run twice each week on different days instead of twice in one day, back-to-back.

Dude or dudette, I totally promise not to tell your SO that you just put their favorite yellow shorts that they've had since college in with your new blue shirt and turned them green. But you *will* be buying them that expensive dinner by way of apology.

Us laundry ninjas know you can't just throw in anything with anything else. Some things will simply shred if you put them in with some other things, like delicates and thick towels, instead of putting them on a different cycle. What this boils down to is that any given laundry day requires multiple loads.

Put in the next load before you go to work, take the dry clothes out when you get home, no problem.

And forget this, if you have kids: there's no such thing as a small amount of laundry, or two day a week laundry.

---

Look, personally, I want local energy storage: I don't want to have to change everything, just because I'm going to be powering everything with the big fusion reactor up in the sky, instead of the little fission reactor down the coast. At some point, it becomes a quality of life issue, and that point hits pretty hard with solar in a different way.

As soon as there's enough solar capacity, and people aren't home to use it, then it redefined "off peak" and "on peak". The "off peak" hours are during the day, when generating capacity exceeds demand, and the "on peak" hours are during the morning and evening, when you're at home and awake, but the sun isn't shining, so there's more demand on the grid, because everyone else keeps the same hours you do.

One of the reasons the PUC in Nevada got rid of net metering was because Nevada was on a trajectory to eventually hit this "solar tipping point", and it was obvious to the utility company that at that point, they'd be paying spot market prices for energy, mostly in the evenings, and they'd end up pretty screwed.

Unless I can have local storage, and it's got to be able to store everything I can generate all day, assuming it starts out dry, the "grid battery" approach looks to be doomed to jacking my utility bills right back to where they used to be, so the power company can maintain revenue under the pretense of "we have to maintain the grid, but all these people have solar, and aren't paying us enough for us to be able to afford to maintain it".

The only viable alternative is to be able to pull the plug completely. And sadly, solar is just not there yet.

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