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Comment Obviously AI is superior to any human judgement (Score 1) 192

An AI can't make mistakes, and only ignorant Luddites with severe paranoia issues would retard process and a better world without human error and the terrible death tolls that follow when doctors are texting or drunk or ... Oh wait. That's self-driving cars. Only SDCs are perfect, I guess, though one would think SD AI doctors would be far better than humans, given the premise of SDCs. If you trust an AI to drive a car, you should trust it to diagnose your cancer. Mistakes on either's part will kill you.

Comment For me, never worked (Score 1) 291

I've tried pairing my phone to Ford cars, and it never works. It pairs, but then: zilch. It thinks it's a music player of some sort. Phone doesn't function through the car. I always carry - YES - a 3.5 audio cable and connect the phone through the headphone jack to hear music. Even THAT fails and I have to reboot the system to make it work. This among many other common failures of simple gadgets make me laugh to see self-driving cars - we are no where near ready for that level of complexity. In the real world, these toys crash constantly.

Comment Re:Microsoft... (Score 1) 291

Odd. The same comments they made could be applied to self-driving cars, which will certainly be far more buggy than the infotainment screen. Only the SDCs could actually kill you. Why people think the music player would naturally be a piece of useless crap code while the car will be an AI marvel far better than human drivers... explain this to me...

Now for the comments about paranoia, stupidity, Ludditism...

Comment Re: As it should be (Score 1) 230

This is going to be a bloody lesson in hubris. Not that believers will look. SD cars already have been in plenty of accidents; it's just our rules for finding fault were written with humans in mind. The car that hits another car is almost always at fault, per human rules, and the SDs are being hit, so therefore no "mistakes" are tallied. Further investigation would be made by the SD car company, which is biased to not find error. The problem is robots can drive so stupidly that a normal human will hit the SDC, and suck up the blame. The real stats are being fudged.

Comment Re:Where?? What is wrong with MORE CHOICE (Score 1) 551

But the audio adapter dongle requires software keys that only Apple can provide. And can withdraw. So, it is DRM that hasn't been switched on. Yet.
Don't give the monkeys the keys to the banana plantation.
This leaves the key in the lock for future implementation. Don't give them a lock, or a key. Audio is all that is left for us now.

Comment Re:Go figure. (Score 1) 250

The sum chance, not the per-time chance, yes. The same is true of all stochastic processes.

It's like saying "the sum of flipping a coin every second and having at least 100 total tails results increases over time."

It's because more trials are constantly being held.

There's also a chance that life will emerge on Earth a second time.

Comment Enough. This is a peer reviewed paper. (Score 1) 299

I can only add to this back-and-forth that the paper in question has been peer reviewed. You all are not dealing with Shawyer's self-published non-reviewed paper here. This is physics, an actual hypothesis. Those of you who disagree have to consider that your comprehension of photon-photon "annihilation" and momentum conservation might be flawed. In any case, we have a way forward; all the previous negative responses had in common (endlessly) was the fact that physics had to be completely wrong for a resonant cavity drive to provide propellantless propulsion. Now we have a way in which EM drives do not violate physics. And - it's emminently testable. Even if Shawyer is completely valueless here, he might have triggered a new way of thinking about momentum transfer, a hack in the universe we can use for propulsion. We need one badly.

Comment Long length and haystack. Weird chars not needed. (Score 1) 637

Length, not weirdness, is the key to uncrackablity. For easy remembering, embed a simple password in a hell of a long string of repeating characters broken up by odd interruptions of non-repeaters. For instance:

=-4=-=-(repeat lots)=-=-yourpassphraseorword=-(repeat lots)=-88=- (repeat lots) -=-
is bloody impossible to crack with any tables.

Most people think password breaking is like the way people crack safes. One spin, crack, another spin, crack, until the code is broken. Password crackers have *no way of knowing* if they are hot or cold. They must guess the entire string at one go. That means length, not oddness, is the primary defense. You can have a simple one word password.... if you embed it in a string of simple and easy to remember character repetitions (broken at random intervals by a deal breaker to foil crackers trying for character padding repetition guesses). Steve Gibson came up with it, and it works, if the site allows for long passwords.

If someone bugged your keyboard, all bets are off, of course.

Note: Slashdot's filter error won't let me type repeating characters.


Design, Hardware, Software Errors Doomed Japanese Hitomi Spacecraft (scientificamerican.com) 101

Reader Required Snark writes: The Japanese space agency JAXA said its recently launched X-Ray observation satellite Hitomi has been destroyed. After a successful launch on February 17, contact with the satellite was lost on March 28. Off the 10-year expected life span, only three days of observations were collected. Preliminary inquiry points to multiple failures in design, hardware and software. After the launch it was discovered that the star tracker stabilization didn't work in a low magnetic flux area over the South Atlantic. When the backup gyroscopic spin stabilization took control, the spin increased instead of stopping. An internal magnetic limit feature in the gyroscope failed, causing the spin get worse. Finally, a thruster based control started, but because of a software failure the spin increased further. The solar panels broke off, leaving the satellite without a long-term power supply. It seems that untested software had been uploaded for thrust control just before the breakup. This is a major loss for astronomical research. Two previous attempts by Japan to launch a high-resolution X-ray calorimeter had also failed, and the next planned sensor of this type is not scheduled until 2028 by the ESA. Just building a replacement unit would take 3 to 5 years and cost $50 million, without the cost of a satellite or launch.

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