Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Debunked? (Score 1) 254

Did we look at the same series of images? Those certainly aren't "INCREDIBLY NSFW & DISTURBING" images. Some are just creative pictures and some are slightly odd artwork. There's nothing wrong with either. There's only one image that's even remotely NSFW, and it's pretty damn non-explicit You guys are crazy by blowing this out of proportion.In fact, the phrase "out of proportion" doesn't even do it justice, since it implies that some wrong was done and that it's less bad than you're saying it is, BUT no wrong was done. So, in reality, where I live, you've seen some art you don't like and decided that it should be criminal. Then you guys made shit up to justify it.

So, on behalf of sane people everywhere, shut the fuck up about stupid shit that's not your business and get a life.

Comment Re:So? (Score 1) 117

I'll grant you that the stuff you need isn't exactly household standard, It's all pretty easily available You don't actually need a platinum foil electrode or a calomel reference electrode; those are just what they used so they could figure out what was going on in the anodization process. You could just about anything, I believe, as the electrode just supplies the electricity, but doesn't interact chemically. I could be wrong, however, but that was my understanding based on my knowledge of these things and reading the paper. In fact, I'm thinking about trying it out. If I can make it work with a custom made battery charging circuit that I've been working on, maybe I'll sell a kit.

Comment Re:That's 129.2F if you're interested. (Score 1) 355

Fahrenheit relates to things you're likely to experience in life. 0F is the temperature at which saltwater freezes. In other words, above 0, you probably won't die or get frostbite; below 0, you will get frostbite and could die. 0F is tits cold. 100F is approximately body temperature (it's actually roughly 98.6F, but 100 is close enough). It was actually the body temperature of Fahrenheit, I believe. Below 100F, you're totally fine as long as you're reasonably healthy. Above 100F, with normal levels of humidity for non-desert areas, you could die from hyperthermia. 100F is ass hot.

To summarize (to the nearest 10 degrees):
0F dangerously cold
30F freezing cold
70F room temp
100F dangerously hot

That's why Fahrenheit is good. All of the normally experienced temperatures are 2 digits. If you go to 3 digits or 1 digit (or negative), you're in the danger zone. If I, as an engineer, had to design a temperature scale for daily use, I'd design Fahrenheit.

Comment Re:That's 129.2F if you're interested. (Score 1) 355

You should come over to West Michigan. We're just like Wisconsin except we rarely go above 100F and rarely go below 0F (although, we did get to -10 or so last winter. That was weird.). The only problem with Grand Rapids is that we get the most snow for a sizable city in the US (according to Wikipedia). A couple of years ago we got more that 80 inches, although 30-40 is more normal. Northern Michgan and the UP are much snowier. East Michigan may as well be Wisconsin as far as snow is concerned. Also, our politicians are less crazy.

Comment Re:Even if you disagree with the judge . . . (Score 1) 150

You are never obliged to report crimes to the police unless you're a mandatory reporter (basically, doctors, social workers and teachers) and the crime is on the mandatory reporting list (child abuse, and that's about it). If you're not a mandatory reporter, then you don't have to report anything for any reason ever. It's actually constitutional, by the way. It's part of the fifth amendment. Basically, the fifth amendment means you can always keep your mouth shut in case you accidentally say something incriminating. In fact, the mandatory reporting requirement has never been tested, and I think is likely unconstitutional.

Additionally, your understanding of accessory is a bit off. To be an accessory, you must know about the crime and provide material aid toward the commission of that crime and there has to be an accessory statute for that crime. For example, if you give a ride to a dude who then commits a murder but you didn't know about the murder, you're fine. If you pick him up afterwards, find out about the murder, and hide him, you're now an accessory after the fact. Another example, you stand in front of a camera so your friend can shoplift, you're not an accessory. Why? Because there's not a statute making being an accessory to shoplifting a crime (in most states; some states have a more general accessory to a crime law which would cover it). You may, however, be guilty of something else like conspiracy to commit fraud, or may even be considered a shoplifter under some statutes, but not an accessory. Final example, you find out about a friend committing a robbery and don't report it to the cops. You're not an accessory, since there's no material aid.

Comment Re:Even if it is money, I get it.... (Score 2) 150

You are never obliged to report crimes to the police unless you're a mandatory reporter (basically, doctors, social workers and teachers) and the crime is on the mandatory reporting list (child abuse, and that's about it). If you're not a mandatory reporter, then you don't have to report anything for any reason ever. It's actually constitutional, by the way. It's part of the fifth amendment. Basically, the fifth amendment means you can always keep your mouth shut in case you accidentally say something incriminating. In fact, the mandatory reporting requirement has never been tested, and I think is likely unconstitutional.

Comment Re:Why should uber exist at all? (Score 1) 95

That's not true. Well, at least not everywhere. In Michigan, having personal insurance when you need commercial insurance invalidates the portion of the insurance that covers the car. The portion that covers medical bills is always valid. Even if it weren't then the other driver's insurance insurance would cover the injuries. If that didn't happen then one of the passengers' insurance would cover the injuries. If the didn't happen, the insurance policy of a person who lives in the same house as one the drivers or the passengers would kick in. Of course, these backup protections are only for medical bills, but there's going to be medical coverage from somewhere. I've heard of bystanding pedestrians claiming to be hit so their insurance would kick for everyone when people in an accident have said that no one has insurance. I little scratch from flying plastic is all it takes to make you part of the accident and make your insurance part of the loop for medical coverage for everyone in the accident.

The neatest part of Michigan's insurance law is that medical bills related to a car accident are covered 100% for life, including lost wages from injuries. It's the best insurance in the country. The only thing that would be better is actual universal health care, which I'd vote for in a heartbeat. If we could referendum universal health care for this country or even just this state, I'd vote for it. I voted for Sanders for this reason, and I voted for Obama for the same reason, and I'll continue to vote for people who claim to want that until we get it. I'll concede that Obamacare is the Republican version of universal health care, but it's not universal enough for me. I have health insurance, but I had it before Obamacare. I know many people who have health care only because of Obamacare, so it works, but I know many people who don't have it yet, so it only sort of works. It's not good enough.

Every five years or so, Republicans try to get rid of Michigan's no-fault auto insurance law, but the people get pissed off and we get to keep our insurance. And since our insurance law was passed as a referendum, it would take 2/3 votes of both houses to get rid of it, which isn't happening anytime soon. The only thing some people don't like about the insurance law is that you can only sue the person at fault in an accident for $500. Everything else has to be covered by your own insurance policy. That's the no-fault part. It doesn't matter who's at fault, your insurance covers your car. Unless the other person was drunk, in which case your insurance must cover it first, but then can sue the drunkard. Note that I said nothing of fault. You are always at fault if you are drunk. And your insurance is invalid if you're drunk. Except for medical, of course. That's always valid.

Comment Re:So what should we do? (Score 1) 567

No, it's not. I drive a manual without a hill hold feature. I've never even considered that such a feature would be nice to have. It's just unnecessary. To start on a hill, you let out the clutch enough to hold the car, while very quickly letting off the brake and touching the gas. Once gassed, let the clutch out the rest of the way and you're off. Doesn't matter if it's an icestorm on a hill or any other conditions; that's what you do. With a little practice, you can use that procedure without any roll-back at all, in any conditions, on any hill. Trust me; I do it all the time.

Slashdot Top Deals

"Here's something to think about: How come you never see a headline like `Psychic Wins Lottery.'" -- Comedian Jay Leno

Working...