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Submission + - Alleged proprietors of "DDOS for hire" service vDOS arrested

pdclarry writes: Brian Krebs reports that the two youthful (18 YO) alleged proprietors of vDOS, the DDOS service that was reported in Slashdot September 9, have been arrested in Israel on a complaint from the FBI. They have been released on $10,000 bond each, their passports lifted, and they have been placed under house arrest, and banned from using the Internet for 30 days. They were probably identified through a massive hack of the vDOS database recently.

Krebs also reports that vDOS's DNS addresses were hijacked by the firm BankConnect Security to get out from under a sustained DDOS attack, and that his site, has been under a sustained DDOS attack since his last article was published, with the packets containing the string "godiefaggot". Those attacks continue, but, as he has been the target of many DDOS attacks in the past, he covered by a DDOS protection firm.

Submission + - Chrome to Begin Labeling HTTP Sites Insecure (

msm1267 writes: Chrome users who navigate to some HTTP sites will be notified, starting in January, they’re on a site that isn’t secure.

Google said today the browser will begin explicitly labeling HTTP connections that feature either a password or credit card form as insecure. The company said the plan is its first step toward marking all HTTP sites as such, though it didn’t provide a timetable for the undertaking.

Google said the move will improve on the browser’s current iteration of a warning, which indicates HTTP connections with a neutral indicator. Eventually, Google plans to mark all HTTP pages as non-secure and use the same red triangle it currently uses for broken HTTPS sites.

Submission + - Norwegian Oil Fund Asked to Consdier if Facebook is Unetical 2

polemistes writes: During the last few weeks there has been an uproar (this is in English) in Norwegian media about Facebook censorship. It started with writer Tom Egeland posting the iconic 1972 photo of Kim Phuc, running from a napalm bomb. Facebook decided that the nudity in the photo could be offensive, so they deleted it. When Egeland posted to criticise the censorship, the whole post was deleted. A major internet news site wrote about it, and the editor shared his article on Facebook, and was blocked for 24 hours. Now the Norwegian Press Association has asked the ethics committee of the Norwegain Oil Fund, who has invested about $1.6 billion in Facebook, to consider whether Facebook is acting unethically. If they are found to do so, the fund will have to withdraw their investments, because its strict ethical code. As a side-note:The google-translated article also censors the photo.

Submission + - The Darker Side of Encryption (

River Tam writes: If every exchange or communication of data on the web was encrypted, would it make our virtual world a more secure place in Australia? A report by PwC found Australia had the highest number of cyber security incidents in the previous 12 months amounting to 9434, more than double the previous year.

Submission + - Could Less Gassy Livestock Be a Cash Cow? (

schwit1 writes: The hamburgers and cheese that come from U.S. cattle may be favorite fare at many summer cookouts, but the methane the same cows produce is significantly less appetizing.

That's especially the case for sustainable investors looking for a low-emission place to park their cash. "Enteric fermentation," or livestock's digestive process, accounts for 22 percent of all U.S. methane emissions, and the manure they produce makes up 8 percent more, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Adding some Beano to their diet won't cut it?

Submission + - Malware Infected All Eddie Bauer Stores in U.S., Canada (

alir1272 writes: Clothing store chain Eddie Bauer said today it has detected and removed malicious software from point-of-sale systems at all of its 350+ stores in North America, and that credit and debit cards used at those stores during the first six months of 2016 may have been compromised in the breach. The acknowledgement comes nearly six weeks after KrebsOnSecurity first notified the clothier about a possible intrusion at stores nationwide.

Submission + - UK police to use civil courts to get money back from cyber criminals (

Bruce66423 writes: Rather than pursue them through the criminal courts, the UK is going to try using the civil courts where the standard of proof is lower but the consequence is only the loss of the assets — and the costs to the defendant.

Whilst clearly preferable to the US's forfeiture programs where the victim has to prove their innocence to get the money and assets seized back, and with a full court involvement, it still raises some concerns, not least: 'the law firm and others in the private sector would bear the risk, in return for a share of the money taken off the criminal suspect'.

Submission + - DDoSCoin: New Crypto-Currency Rewards Users for Participating in DDoS Attacks ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: In the most innovative, weirdest, and stupidest idea of the month, two researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Michigan have created a crypto-currency that rewards people for participating in DDoS attacks. Called DDoSCoin, this digital currency rewards a person (the miner) for using their computer as part of a DDoS attack.

Just like Bitcoin, DDoSCoin uses cryptographic data to provide a proof-of-work. In DDoSCoin's case, this proof-of-work is extracted from the TLS connection a miner establishes with the website they're supposed to attack. This means that DDoSCoin can be used only with DDoS attacks on TLS-enabled websites. Participating in DDoS attacks gives miners DDoSCoin, which can then be converted in Bitcoin or fiat currency.

Furthermore, anyone can request a DDoS attack via the PAY_TO_DDOS transaction. The research paper that proposes DDoSCoin is only a theoretical exercise, and a DDoSCoin crypto-currency does not currently exist in the real world. For now.

Submission + - Fixing 'Tedious and Error-Prone' Computer Programming (

the_insult_dog writes: A computer programming research program called ExCAPE funded to the tune of more than $9 million by the National Science Foundation aims to use automated program-synthesis tools to address some of the longstanding problems in software development. While its lofty goals of broadly remaking the art of programming might not be realized, the research has already made some advances and resulted in several tool already in use in areas such as commercial software production and education, reports Application Development Trends magazine..

Submission + - China Start Development of Hybrid Spaceplane (

hackingbear writes: While SpaceX is making news with its recoverable rockets, China announced that it is working on the next big thing in spaceflight: a hypersonic spaceplane. The China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation is beginning advanced research on a high tech, more efficient successor to the retired Space Shuttle, with hybrid combined cycle engines combining turbofan, ramjet, scramjet and rocket engines, that can takeoff from an airport's landing strip and fly straight into orbit. CASTC's rapid research timeline also suggests that the reports in 2015 of a Mach 4 test flight for a recoverable drone testbed for a combined cycle ramjet/turbofan engine were accurate. And China also has the world's largest hypersonic wind tunnel, the Mach 9 JF-12, which could be used to easily test hypersonic scramjets without costly and potentially dangerous flight testing at altitude. Its nearest competitor, the British Skylon in contrast uses pre-cooled jet engines built by Reaction Engines Limited to achieve hypersonic atmospheric flight, as opposed to scramjets. Both spacecraft will probably first fly around the mid 2020s.

Submission + - The Music Industry's New War Is About So Much More Than Copyright (

tedlistens writes: Last month, Taylor Swift, U2, and around 180 other artists signed a letter calling on US lawmakers to reform the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998, or DMCA, which it said allowed "major tech companies to grow and generate huge profits” while leaving artists underpaid. (Though YouTube isn't mentioned by name, it's obvious to which "major tech companies” the letter is referring.) Still, while complaining (or hearing complaints) about low revenues from digital music has become as much a rock & roll cliche as devil horns or dying young, a deeper read of the industry's latest campaign against Silicon Valley “greed” (and 8 helpful charts) reveals that this "war" on online streaming is more complex than it seems: in spite of its efforts at a subscription service, YouTube's ad-based royalties remain a major issue. And untangling it is more important than ever: as it seeps again into the halls of Congress, the debate could impact copyright, online ads, and the future of making and listening to music.

The World Video Game Hall of Fame 2016 Inductess 54

Reader Dave Knott writes: The World Video Game Hall Of Fame has announced its inductees for the year 2016, the second group of games to be so honoured since the award's inception in 2015. The Hall Of Fame "recognizes individual electronic games of all types -- arcade, console, computer, handheld, and mobile -- that have enjoyed popularity over a sustained period and have exerted influence on the video game industry or on popular culture and society in general". This year's six inductees are: Grand Theft Auto III, The Legend of Zelda, The Oregon Trail, The Sims, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Space Invaders.The Sydney Morning Herald has more details.

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