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Comment Re:Poor business (Score 1) 351

The problem is that any given reviewer wont "mesh" with what *YOU* like. Or what *I* like.

True.

OTOH, I find that the aggregate consensus of several hundred reviewers actually gives me a really good idea of how good a movie is. That's not the same as saying it's a good indicator of what I'll like; there are some crappy movies that I like quite a lot. But if a film gets an 80% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and it has a significant number of reviews (obscure films sometimes don't), I can be pretty much guaranteed that it will not be a waste of my time. Perhaps it won't become a favorite, but it will be reasonably well-written, well-acted, etc. In other words, it won't suck.

I do occasionally see movies with low ratings, but only when there's some other factor motivating me -- and I often walk out disappointed. I also occasionally see movies that I have no real interest in, but have high ratings (and which my wife wants to see) -- and I nearly always enjoy them anyway. There are exceptions both ways, but the RT rating is generally an excellent guide.

Comment Re:If self driving cars take off (Score 1) 191

I actually believe if self-driving cars take off, drive times will go down. The programmers of the cars can do a lot to alleviate the bad behaviors people have gotten in to that just makes heavy traffic worse.

If you then ban human-operated vehicles from (some) roads, or maybe just some lanes (which should be separated from lanes usable by human-operated vehicles), it can get even better. Vehicles in constant radio communication with each other and with sub-millisecond reaction times should be able to significantly increase highway speeds and reduce inter-vehicle distance to inches, while simultaneously increasing safety.

If you can remove human-operated vehicles from all roads, you can also get rid of stop lights and stop signs. Vehicles can negotiate appropriate gaps as they approach an intersection.

Comment Re:Norton (Score 2) 71

The difference now is that many hackers have developed tools for MITM attacks on https.

Yes and the same tools work with a self-signed cert or with HTTP. To make them work with HTTPS and a signed cert, you need to have a compromised CA signing cert. This is still currently mostly limited to nation-state adversaries.

Comment Re:the Snowflake Jihad (Score 2) 239

You seem to think there's some assault on free speech here. There isn't. At all. YouTube isn't taking "offensive" videos down -- not any more than they always have, anyway -- they're just not showing ads on videos the advertisers don't want to be associated with. The free speech of the people uploading the videos is fully intact, and in fact YouTube continues giving them a free soapbox from which to reach the world. The free speech of the advertisers is also being honored, by allowing them to avoid appearing to speak in support of things they don't want to support.

The only perspective from which anything "bad" is happening is the one which presumes that the makers of YouTube content have some "right" to be paid. There is no such right, never has been and I sincerely hope there never, ever will be.

(Disclaimer: I work for Google, but that has absolutely nothing to do with my position on this issue.)

Comment Re:Norton (Score 1) 71

Step one: Any browser that cares about security MUST stop regarding https with CA certificates as any more trustworthy that self-signed certificates or plain http.

Why? Plain HTTP can be compromised by anyone on a hop between you and your destination. HTTPS with a self-signed certificate can be compromised by anyone on a hop between you and your destination, but can be detected if you do certificate pinning or certificate transparency. HTTPS with a signed cert can only be compromised with cooperation from a CA. The set of people that can compromise signed HTTPS is significantly lower than the set that can compromise self-signed HTTPS.

Comment Re:Uh.... what? (Score 2) 188

2. Collective or other shared accommodation, often combined with studies.

It's pretty common to move accommodation for each year of a degree, so this can easily be 3-4, more if you do a PhD or similar (though people often find a place for the whole of their PhD). I can remember the second and third places I lived as a student (I stayed in the same place for two years of undergrad and then for the whole of my PhD), but the first was university-owned accommodation and I don't recall the exact address - I certainly don't remember post codes for all of them.

Comment Re:"vacation" (Score 4, Insightful) 188

It's been over a decade since the US tightened the visa restrictions so that everyone wanting to come into the country as a practicing journalist must have a visa, even if they're from one of the visa-waiver countries. You can bet that if you tick that box, you're already going to come under a lot of extra scrutiny (and if you don't, but then publish anything written about your time in the USA, expect to be denied entry the next time).

Comment Re:That's stupid. (Score 2) 234

It depends on how you arrange the lights. In the UK, there's a delay in between one set of lights going red and the next going green. In a number of US cities that I've visited, one set turns green at precisely the same instant that the other turns red. This means that going through the lights as they turn red is potentially very dangerous, because you will still be crossing the intersection while cars from other directions go. Adding a small delay, larger than the grace period, would likely improve safety considerably.

The USA has 7.1 fatalities per billion km driven, whereas the UK has only 3.6. It's tempting to blame the drivers (and the difference in driving tests in the two countries lends some support to this), but the road designers have a lot to blame. The US statistics are likely even worse for in-city driving, because the totals are skewed by the fact that you can drive far further in the US without encountering another vehicle than in the UK.

Comment Re:I'm all over this (Score 1) 127

So you're saying you don't even want to watch the film, you just want to be able to talk about it later (but only in the next few days)? The problem with that idea is that it only works if you surround yourself with other keep-up-with-the-Joneses types who insist on watching the latest blockbuster as soon as it comes out and have limited other conversational topics.

Comment Re: I am very skeptical. (Score 1) 99

Just the fact that you use those silly google names to indicate android version shows how far up the posterior of google you are. So sad. Just refer to android versions by number so we can understand.

You're crazy, basically no one knows the numbers. Look at all the discussions in the press, ask around to people (among people who even know that there are different versions of Android). Everyone who knows anything about Android releases knows the dessert names. The numbers are enthusiast-only trivia.

Comment Re:I am very skeptical. (Score 3, Interesting) 99

I highly doubt that 29% of Androids are up to date.

Keep in mind that the security patch level field was added in Android Marshmallow (IIRC), and I expect that's what they're using to determine patch date. If so, KitKat and Lollipop devices aren't counted, and this really says that 29% of Android devices that are new enough to have Marshmallow or Nougat are up to date. That's not surprising, though it's obviously still far too low.

Unless, of course, the report assumes that anything running Lollipop or older is not recently patched, which seems like a reasonable assumption.

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