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Comment Re:Top 3 promising fusion concepts: (Score 1) 325

It also took 20% of the world's oil production offline for nearly a decade, which profits other oil companies, especially with the guaranteed market for military fuel. And there was a _hope_, ill-founded, that a wave of strong anti-Muslim-leadership politics would sweep the region.

Comment Re:Mixed Metaphors (Score 1) 408

>> The revolution led directly to famine, from destruction of the economy, and genocide during the Reign of Terror. So yes, I'd say that Marie Antoinette's political behavior was "not doing anything wrong".

> Whenever it's the rich and the bourgeois taking it up the ass, rather than the poor, the fainting couches are whipped out and hands get chapped from frantic

When it's someone like Marie Antoinette, who actually tried to stabilize the country, who are blamed for the atrocities and used as examples of the abuses and are executed for them, it's important to defend them. Blame her for her very _real_ sins, such as her long resistance to badly needed fiscal reforms, not for complete disregard of the poor and of the populace of France that was more founded in propaganda. The "let them eat cake" quote was apparently just such propaganda.

Comment Re:Mixed Metaphors (Score 1) 408

>> genocide during the Reign of Terror.

> Really? Against who?

The Vendee, in a region mostly populated by the Catholics of France. The wholesale slaughter among them was one of the reasons the "Reign of Terror" was known as such. I do note that the genocide was not one-sided, the Verdee were themselves engaging in slaughter of civilians based on religious differences.

Comment Deiterium-Tritisum Fusion no good for power (Score 1, Insightful) 325

I'm afraid that this design, like nearly all modern fusion designs, relies on deuterium-tritium fusion. Both are awkward, expensive, and even dangerous to produce and refine. Tritium, in particular has a quite short half-life and is best refined from nuclear waste at fission plants. If you are already producing enough tritium to run fusion reactors, you already have more than enough fission plants to provide far more and far more reliable energy. There are numerous old papers laying out the difficulties, such as http://fire.pppl.gov/fesac_dp_.... Note that it's theoretically possible to generate more tritium than is currently generated by switcing to "breeder" fission reactors, but those have proven extremely dangerous to manage due to their use in creating plutonium, which is quite useful for nuclear weapon building. It's a very dangerous technology, and the generation of tritium on a commercial scale would be tied to creating _far_ more plutonium than is currently created.

The only currently feasible, safer, and scalable source of deuterium and tritium for fusion reactors is solar sails, capturing the more refinable percentage of such particles in solar wind. Since a solar sail is already capturing approximately 20 KW/square meter of sail from electromagnetic solar radiation, that is a vastly safer and easier to handle power source than collecting and shipping the isotopes of hydrogen to the necessary fusion reactor. Much like building a vast array of breeder reactors to generate tritium for fusion reactors, there is _no point_ to trying to run a fusion plant when the collection and refinement plant itself generates far more directly usable energy than can even theoretically be produced by D-T fusion.

I'll simplify by using the metaphor a colleague gave me recently. The refinement of deuterium and tritium for fusion power is like heating homes by burning the signs and posters put up to protest nuclear power plants. It can be done in theory, but it is not efficient and does not scale well.

Comment Re:Mixed Metaphors (Score 1) 408

Stopping a revolution is considered loyalty to an existing nation and the country of which she was Queen. The revolution led directly to famine, from destruction of the economy, and genocide during the Reign of Terror. So yes, I'd say that Marie Antoinette's political behavior was "not doing anything wrong".

Comment Re:Mixed Metaphors (Score 1) 408

It also apparently wasn't Marie Antoinette who said it. She was actually quite sensitive to the distress of the poor, and the beginning of the French Revolution libeled her frequently for being foreign, not for anything she actually did wrong.

She was a fascinating woman, I can quite understand why the French king felt attracted to her.

Comment Re:plenty of ways to waste your money. (Score 1) 53

> The reality is that retirees don't want a 40-60 hour work week--they're fucking retired.

The reality, unfortunately, is that many retirees don't want to retire. They're offered early retirement, or forced into retirement, in order to save money on senior employee salaries, or to eliminate an employee who disagrees with new corporate policy. I've several peers of my age who've faced just this in both public and private organizations.

Comment Re:Init alternatives (Score 1) 330

> Nothing is preventing anybody to re-implement the external API's of systemd on any OS (well need D-Bus).

D-Bus does not exist for any other kernel. Attempting to replicate the API's of such a constantly growing, expanding, and feature increasing API that replaces stable internal daemon, network, mounting, and security features would be far more destabilizing that systemd's own growth.

The result is that cross-platform support now requires publication of several sets of init tools, typically SysV scripts for other platforms and systemd for modern Linux distributions. I'm afraid it's discouraging cross-platform work, which is unfortunate.

>> The default was changed to enabled in the systemd source code in release 230. Unless distributions or developers manually patch their configurations, this unrequested behavior is now on by default.

> There is a configure flag. Anyway, systemd needs to be integrated inside the distributions, it's definitely not advised for random users to compile it themselves without using the distro patches.

The default for the configure flag was changed. Previously working builds would now actively break common user tools, such as screen, tmux, and nohup, without leaving any systemd log of when they were killing such processes.

Like many other systemd architectural changes, this broke numerous long stable tools for no particular benefit. The normal way to kill long-running processes belonging to absent users is a cron job that emails the adminisator. Such tasks normally also allow exceptions for adminstrative users, and have even been written with alternative policies for unattended use or with warning notes to the particular users before killing their tasks, along with a log of the worst offenders.

Comment Re: planned for AFTER hillary's election (Score 1) 72

> The fact that they are disenfranchising their voters means nothing.

Not at all. The ability to vote the way _some_ voters of their districts selected, rather than the current "winner-take-all" common practices, would indeed enfranchise many voters from their districts. It's also supported by the Constitution. Even a casual reading of Article II shows that the electors can use their judgment to select a President.

Comment Re:Init alternatives (Score 1) 330

> Well the goal of systemd is to be a base system for GNU/Linux distributions to reduce the gaps between them.

Please note the "Linux only" focus. It's not compatible with _any_ other free software or open source based operating system. And "reducing the gaps between them" has been breaking many stable, long-working tools without significant benefit.

>> such as the default enabled "KillUserProcess" command

> No distribution that I know enable that by default

The default was changed to enabled in the systemd source code in release 230. Unless distributions or developers manually patch their configurations, this unrequested behavior is now on by default.

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