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Comment Re:There are 5 trillion /56 blocks (Score 1) 148

> It may surprise you that 64bit processors don't limit your ability to work with numbers higher than that.

Larger numbers create an additional storage, memory, and data access cost at some very deep layers of the stack. That cost is, in fact, a profound limit on the ability of network software, and hardware, to operate under load.

Comment Re:Get with it cloud providers. And network provid (Score 1) 148

> 's amazing IPv6 has as much traffic as it does.

It's really not been necessary. I've not seen a single business or service provider failing to find, or provide for its customers, some IPv4 space to host their services, even if it's a name based proxy. Can you think of or find a single commercial service whose IP addresses are only IPv6, without any accompanying IPv4?

Comment Re: Impossible... (Score 5, Insightful) 332

> They could likely afford it, but the typical H1-B is hoarding as much money as possible so they can take it back to their country.

Of course they are. They're being thoughtful, responsible people planning for a future, and perhaps even planning for their family's needs. Americans spending s much as we do on "entertainment" as part of our work life, on expensive lunches and expensive hobbies is why so few of of my younger colleagues in the field have any savings, or fallback plans if their startup stock options turn out to be worthless.

There are reasons to dislike the results of H1B immigration. Fiscal caution by the H1B holders is not a reasonable one.

Comment Re:I'll bet it's all Larry (Score 5, Interesting) 154

"Microsoft says it is not involved", as quoted in the article, is not precisely the same claim as "Microsoft is not involved". Microsoft demonstrated during the SCO/Linux lawsuits that they could, and did, hide their business sponsorship of morally bankrupt legal fraud by encouraging their business partners to engage in support of the fraudulent litigants. That effectively kept Microsoft funding of the lawsuit from showing up in any directly traceable payments.

Comment Re: Heu.. ???? (Score 2) 396

This has been true for decades. The forced familiarity with lower level tools such as DNS, DHCP, LDAP, or CIFS to manage services in a standards based and standards compliant way provides deeper knowledge and ability to fix issues than a typical Windows of equal experience brings to the task. Too much of Windows admin knowledge is often transient, learning specific button clicking interface patterns for certain tasks, with little review of _how_ things work or how the configuration data is stored The simple fact that Active Directory published "export" of their configurations bear only a casual resemblance to the actual data used is not something they are trained to appreciate.

Comment Re:Dumb (Score 2) 140

> - Convincing the "architect" who hasn't coded anything in years that your functional spec is the 21st century way to meet the requirements.

I'm afraid you left out "finding out that the way it was done originally had a very good though undocumented reason, and explaining why the new software actually provides no gain whatsoever".

Comment Re: Verdict sound legitimate (Score 2) 162

He'd have to convince the court that there was enough likelihood of infringement to issue a subpoena. That is more difficult when you have little to no budget and there may be other, legal ways to write the same software. It's a cpoyright infringement, not a patent infringement, so the code would have to be substantively identical.

Even companies _claiming_ infringement of their software have been very reluctant to show their source code in court. One understandable fear is that it will be copied and spread and lose trade secrets. Another is that it may convince people that they are lyin gthieves, That seems to be what happened when SCO tried to sue various Linux users infringing SCO's licenses for \UNIX source code, While SCO turned out to be mistaken in claiming ownership of SysV UNIX, which still resided with Novell, they were never compelled in court to show the full set of source code they were claiming was infringed.

The lawsuits from SCO were ridiculous, but stretched on for years. I hope this judge pays attention to that lawsuit in exactly how _not_ to handle a software copyright case.

Comment Re:The real question should be (Score 1) 136

> Why rate increases for the cloud service? The data ought to be encrypted before it even leaves the trusted host and is uploaded onto the cloud.

In that case, you'll wind up paying in the short or longer term in resources. Investing some of your VM's computational resources in local encryption means resources not available for the tasks that the server actually provides, and may require larger instances or longer run time. The encryption winds up costing electricity, if nothing else, and someone will wind up paying extra for that unless your servers are notably overpowered for their task.

I agree that full access to any keys for the cloud provider is a problem. It's why some people encrypt attached storage, and provide the keys manually at boot time. It's also why Java based keystores support manual unlocking of the keys when a Tomcat or similar server is started. That still leaves that startup session requiring manual intervention or a sophisticated "phone home" tool. Unfortunately, the work to provide and support _that_ is not free.

Comment Re:The real question should be (Score 1) 136

> Do you think that cloud services should be setup in such a way that the provider is even capable of decrypting user data? IMO, the answer should be no.

Encryption, and robust encryption, puts the data at the risk of losing the keys. Even securing the keys in a reliable escrow service leaves them vulnerable both to loss, and to theft. And if you test the performance of encrypted disks, encrypted SSD access, and encrypted network communications, all have significant performance costs and even electrical costs for supporting the additional processing needed. It also makes backups vulnerable to bitrot, where bitrot will break the decryption process where it might have been previously a recoverable error with unencrypted data.

This would mean very real performance losses and rate increases for even the simplest of cloud services. Few businesses are wiling to spend that much even on genuinely increased security.

Comment Re:Why isn't symmetric crypto threatened by quantu (Score 1) 55

On review, I was unclear. The arbitrary enforcement of the remaining regulations by the Department of Commerce effectively hinders, robust encryptyon, including the increase of key lengths. Only those technologies deemed "suitable" by the Department of Commerce are allowed export license. The standards are no longer so clear, but similar to those The licensing and approvals necessary to provide robust encryption as a general practice are so burdensome that network equipment vendors find themselves fiscally constrained from providing it, even if it is not specifically banned.

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