Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:What Google+ Needs To Beat Facebook is (Score 1) 75

No it needs to fix Picasa Web Albums. I tried to load my entire photo collection in to Picasa Web Albums and came across 2 problems. Firstly local tags don't aways get put online, when they don't appear online the application detags them locally. Secondly it creates duplicate people I have a person called bob, I upload 2 photo's of bob to web albums on my local machine that is one person but on Picasa Web Albums bob now has two person albums. This problem is compounded by the fact you can't merge or delete duplicate people albums. I have no photos in web albums at the moment but my account is stuck with over 400 empty people albums most of which are duplicates. Lastly just because I tag someone in Picasa Web Albums doesn't mean they are tagged in a Google + stream and tagging a person through the Google+ stream does not tag that person in Picasa Web Albums.

The people manager issue has been a known bug for more than a year and Google haven't even acknowledged it, for me the draw of Google+ was circles and Picasa Web Albums. If Picasa Web Albums is broken what is the point?

Comment Re:Real Engineers... (Score 1) 580

As a software engineer I take offence to that. I work for a CMMI Level 5 rated business unit, process is everything. First you develop requirements, then design use cases, then outline the high level design (functional area's, etc..) if required you complete the design in UML to a class level (depending on target safety level). This is documented and reviewed by peers, you generally have to justify any design decisions. You also have to specify any external interfaces and detail them so a 3rd party could implement them. Once the design is approved you develop component, system and unit tests which should trace back to requirements. If tests are needed after the code has been written (say new requirements come in) the person who implemented the code can not write the tests. Finally after all this is done you get to implement the code (depending on size multiple people may do the implementing).

We tend to run products through iterative testing process, when we are happy the tests and all project documentation are independently audited. At that point the product is considered "ready". Occasionally if your unlucky you get to see the customer integration and provide technical support.

What would a professional engineer do differently? In my next job is labelled software consultant and my biggest fear is it won't have decent engineering processes.

Comment Re:Quad Core In a Tablet/Phone? (Score 4, Interesting) 123

For me it's more about the manufacturing yields, the article mentions TMSC are struggling with their 40nm production process and this thing is 28nm being released next year. From what I understand TMSC is being used to remove Apples reliance on Samsung, I wouldn't be surprised if this allows Samsung, etc.. to jump ahead as TMSC don't sound ready to mass produce the chip.

Dual core makes sense because of power saving issues, you can have one low clocked core which is enough for basic phone functionality which is turned off when you started using the phone. In this sense I could even understand a triple core chip, you would have one low power core for when the phones not being used, then when it is you can move OS/Background processes to one core and have a 3rd core for running the main process.

Surely a purpose built GPU would give far better gaming improvements than an additional A9 core.

Comment Re:Other representatives (Score 3, Insightful) 186

It sounds close to the official number as quick glance at BBC news's website shows. Nothing to do with collusion, people keep talking about all of the CCTV camera's in the UK police have been identifying people through that. Most of the papers have also been printing pictures of rioters in an effort to identify them, there are about half a dozen stories of mothers turning in their kids when they saw the child's photo in a national paper.

This meeting is the higher ups way of looking like they are doing something to daily mail readers, I'm hoping nothing comes of it especially when you realise Twitter & Facebook were used by people to organise clean-ups and identify the rioters.

There has also been a lot of talk about the harshness of the punishments handed down to rioters. The UK doesn't require mobile phones to have Government available GPS tracking like the USA. You can only check-in with Facebook/Google latitude and not twitter.

Comment Re:CEOs Unwilling Even To Pay For Technical Debt (Score 1) 321

I've tried to find a middle road, if I come across design flaws/hacked code. I write a series of unit tests for the component and for the individual classes while I write the hack fix. Once I've come across the same class 3/4 times there are usually unit tests covering the class in depth. So when I go to management I can promise that there is a low/no chance of the behaviour changing and point to numerous issues we have had to fix because of the problem.

Comment Re:Are they -trying- to kill Firefox? (Score 1) 683

That is a wonderful idea which doesn't work in practice. I'm currently writing a very simple web application, I'm sticking purely to the XHTML 1.1 and CSS 2.0 specification. Now IE 7\8 have their own idiosyncrasies but they are generally predicatable and well documented. Safari (buggy as anything on my machine) and Chrome seem to strictly follow the standard but have a few CSS deficencies (collapsing borders of Input button types for example). Firefox lives in its own little land while it has a wider range of support some of the CSS fields work strangely and there are a number of display issues. For example I have something like the following:

table style"width:20%;border:1px;"
tr
td
p text /p
/td
td
input type="button" value="test" style="width:100%;"/
/td
/tr
/table

Now in IE6, IE7,IE8,IE9,Chrome & Safari if I were to change the value of the button using javascript the table cell would resize to fit the new value in Firefox 3.5 it doesn't.

Funny thing is when I started the project someone suggested simply writing a, Eclipse RCP, iOS and Andriod application because it would be quicker. Considering the time I have had to spend I think they might have actually been right.

Comment Re:Sea water for cooling? (Score 1) 280

Depending on the radioactivity of the water, I can think of a couple of uses. You could build a smaller generator station and use the energy of the water to pump it through a generator. By passing it through another lower pressure generator you would take a lot of the heat out of the water. Or you could use it to heat local homes/businesses (similar to Geothermal heating).

Sure dumping in to the ocean has to remain an option but why waste all of that energy?

Comment Re:The real "problem" (Score 2) 214

No the use of American/English common names is to make you think they are from your home nation. They give groundings in your nations cultures/past-tense to help keep up the pretense. They do it because the people running these call centers know that people hate calling Indian call centers, if you read the article you would see that.

I went to secondary school with several Asian immigrants they all had standard English first names and kept their normal surname e.g. Alex Tse and Micheal Pan. They didn't choose the names because they were easier to remember, their stated reason was they choose to move to the UK and so they took and English name to show their willingness to integrate with UK society.

I think they have the right attitude and its the only way large scale immigration can work, I hate the idea of multiculturalism because it flies in the face of that attitude and encourages us to notice the differences rather than the similarities. It also encourages people to create sub-cultures since they don't have to integrate in to society but society should change for them. I should point out that I also dislike English people who move to France/Spain and create English enclaves and don't integrate into the French/Spanish culture.

Comment Re:Dont know why we dont like foreign call centers (Score 1) 214

I don't know about America but I have found a difference between UK center call staff (on-shore) and Indian/whatever (off-shore) staff. Off-shored staff will always follow the script, it doesn't matter if you have already listed trying everything in the script you will be walked through it. About 60-70% of UK staff will listen to you and will either escalate your call or move to areas of the script you haven't covered. For example when I called O2 tech support about my O2 Router being broken, I took a minute to explain what I had done, they guy agreed it sounded like the router was fried and asked if I could try one last thing.

The other big difference is non-off shored staff will admit to a situation being crap, or the company making a mistake. For example I started receiving strange text messages about my O2 broadband. I phoned them up and found out I was being disconnected because I was a high user, the guy on the phone went through the notes and admitted that O2 had tried to contact me but not used any of the contact details I had supplied (used my land line number instead of mobile and emailed my O2 email instead of my Hotmail, since the mobile side of my account used these imagine my confusion). He agreed the situation was crap and O2 had failed me, he then offered to try and get the cancellation stopped since I hadn't been properly warned.

When a company off-shores tech support I know they are doing it to provide the cheapest possible service and it shows, so I tend to vote with my wallet and leave. I agree not all local support is good but it does tend to be better.

Comment Re:Honestly - why do business in the U.S. (Score 1) 239

No-one in the Greek government is demanding tax cuts, they are looking at decreasing spending, Greece's problem has come from widespread tax avoidance by the general population mixed with massive overspending by the government. The problem got as bad as it did because the Greek governments have successively lied about their budgets. The Greek protests are about the massive cuts mixed with a large scale sell off of nationally owned assets.

As for constant the Conservatives are heading a coalition government in the UK, a quick Google shows no planned tax cuts by the government and they only party in the UK asking for one is Labour .

Comment Re:This happens a lot (Score 1) 427

I think a good example of this is the "jobs" new labour created during the end of their government in the UK. Several hundred thousand jobs were created but only a tiny fraction employed the native population. The vast majority of the jobs went to work migrants from poorer areas of the EU. This is because the work migrants were willing to live in army barrack like conditions (I knew a polish taxi driver who was living with 20 other guys in a "converted" ship cargo container) they could work for a much reduced wage because they were willing to tolerate those conditions because the low cost of living in their home country meant their families could live comfortably.

The polish influx seriously damaged the taxi industry and put a lot of people on the dole, I hear something similar is happening to HGV drivers now. In the taxi driver case Plymouth the city with the cheapest taxi services in the country had a massive influx of polish drivers who would deliberately charge a lower than meter value and hand out cards so people could call them direct. The two largest taxi firms lost most of their native living taxi drivers because doubling the number of taxis on the road meant they couldn't earn enough to pay equipment rent. Then when most of the polish drivers left the taxi rates went up substantially.

This is not a anti-foreigner rant but a tale of what happens when enough people are willing to work for a non-liveable wage (e.g. free) they screw things up for the rest in the industry. The benefits are very short term, but companies really don't like to train any more.

Comment Re:Not a problem (Score 2) 334

Your American and don't know what your talking about, the IRA deliberately targeted civilian areas in England and in Northern Ireland. It's aim was to re-integrate Northern Ireland with the Republic of Ireland through terror. It did play along Catholic and Protestant lines because there are deep social tensions in that area.

The UK armed forces got involved because the police couldn't deal with them as the IRA was robbing banks, blowing people up and had massive ammunition stock piles which were funded by Americans (particularly New Yorkers).

212 people injured by the IRA
Wikipedia puts the number of people murdered at 1824, 624 were civilians

Great Restraint indeed.

Slashdot Top Deals

Unix is a Registered Bell of AT&T Trademark Laboratories. -- Donn Seeley

Working...