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Comment Learn by doing (Score 1) 98

Classes are great- they give you the deadlines and some basic knowledge, but like any other skill, it must be practiced to be fully developed. Programming can mesh well with online learning- the physical requirements (equipment) are pretty easily available. A class is great, it is only a complement to actually doing something, and that requires commitment from the student.

However, I think "programming" is just way too generic a designator. Knowing how to program is mostly about knowing syntax- it doesn't really show you how to actually do anything terribly useful- that's what the rest of your education is for. An online programming course is awesome, but only taken as part of a whole- the math, science, language, etc. education are also vital aspects to actually getting things done.

Android

Submission + - Popular Android ROM Accused of GPL Violation (thepowerbase.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A petition has recently been started to get the developer of the popular Android "MIUI" ROM, Chinese based Xiaomi, to comply with the GPL.

While Android itself is licensed under the Apache 2.0 License, and therefore does not actually require derivative works to be FOSS, the Linux kernel itself is GPL-licensed and needs to remain open.

Unless Xiaomi intends to develop a replacement for the Linux kernel, they need to make their modifications public.

Submission + - NTP glitch reverts clocks back to 2000 (sans.edu)

An anonymous reader writes: It seems a glitch of some sort wreaked havoc on some NTP servers yesterday, causing many machines to revert to the year 2000. It seems the Y2K bug that never happened is finally catching up with us in 2012.
Security

Submission + - Israel Infrastructure Proves Too Strong For Anonymous (timesofisrael.com) 1

Mephistophocles writes: Ever since the beginning of Operation Pillar of Defense, hackers have been working overtime to strike a blow against the Israeli government’s computer systems, Finance Minister Yuval Steinitz said Sunday. No fewer than 44 million attacks have been recorded since the operation began five days ago — with nearly all of them failing, thanks to the recent strengthening of computer defense systems in Israel.

Speaking at a special press conference at the Government Computing Center in Jerusalem about the cyber war against Israel that has accompanied Hamas’s rocket attacks, Steinitz said that hackers “are trying to disable the symbols of Israeli sovereignty, to enter web sites and install anti-Israel content, thus compromising information and data and damaging the government’s ability to serve the public.” Most of the attacks, he said, were against government sites, like the Prime Minister’s Office site, and security-related sites, such as that of the Home Front Command, the body charged with informing Israelis on how to protect themselves in the event of an attack.

Out of those 44 million-plus attacks on government and defense related sites, said Steinitz, only one succeeded – partially. One site, which he did not name, was “wobbly for a few minutes,” but quickly recovered. Even though the government has been successful in warding off hack attacks, Steinitz said that government sites were fully backed up and mirrored, meaning that they could be replaced by a duplicate site instantly if the original site were compromised.

Television

Submission + - Giant Boxing Robots Reality Show Unveiled (ew.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It looks like the next generation of "Battle Bots" is here:

Syfy has greenlit and shot the first season of a new show where eight-foot-tall state-of-the-art humanoid robots will rock ‘em and sock ‘em in a boxing cage until one is defeated. The future-shock new series is called Robot Combat League and the project has been kept under wraps until today. The action resembles a real-life version of last year’s hit movie Real Steel, with large menacing robots pounding away at each other in a satisfying shower of sparks and gushing hydraulic fluid.

There's pics with the story.

Japan

Submission + - World's First 3D Printing Photo Booth Set for Scan (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Ever wanted a life-like miniature of yourself or loved ones? Now's your chance, thanks to Omote 3D, which will soon be opening what's described as the world's first 3D printing photo booth in Harajuku, Japan. There, visitors will have their bodies scanned into a computer, a process which takes about 15 minutes. Then the company prints your statuette on their 3D color printer in one of three sizes.
Iphone

Submission + - iPhone 5S production reportedly kicks off ahead of launch in the first half next (bgr.com)

zacharye writes: Is Apple’s annual mobile device launch schedule accelerating? The fourth-generation iPad launched in September this year after the third-generation model was released in March, and now a report on Monday from Chinese newspaper Commercial Times claims Apple’s manufacturing partners will begin trial production of the next-generation “iPhone 5S” in December after the iPhone 5 just launched less than two months ago. Initial volumes are said to be in the range of 50,000 to 100,000 units...
Science

Submission + - Supersymmetry theory dealt a blow (bbc.co.uk)

Dupple writes: Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider have detected one of the rarest particle decays seen in Nature.

The finding deals a significant blow to the theory of physics known as supersymmetry.

Many researchers had hoped the LHC would have confirmed this by now.

Supersymmetry, or SUSY, has gained popularity as a way to explain some of the inconsistencies in the traditional theory of subatomic physics known as the Standard Model.

The new observation, reported at the Hadron Collider Physics conference in Kyoto, is not consistent with many of the most likely models of SUSY.

Prof Chris Parke, who is the spokesperson for the UK Participation in the LHCb experiment, told BBC News: "Supersymmetry may not be dead but these latest results have certainly put it into hospital."

Submission + - Haiku R1 Alpha 4 has been released! (haiku-os.org)

kallisti5 writes: "The Haiku project released their 4th alpha release today. A year and four months have passed since the 3rd alpha release. Haiku R1A4 includes several enhancements such as a large number of bug fixes, early IPv6 support, better drivers, improved file system support, better localization, and a wide variety of new features and applications."
Microsoft

Submission + - Next Microsoft Gaming System May Be The 7-Inch "Xbox Surface" (idigitaltimes.com)

amkkhan writes: The Xbox 720 may have to wait. Rumors are now swirling that the next Microsoft gaming system won't be the Xbox 720, rumored to be the name of the successor to the immensely popular Xbox 360, but that the next Microsoft gaming platform will be a 7-inch tablet called the Xbox Surface.

If the Xbox 720 is put on hold for the Xbox Surface, it would mark a foray into the world of legitimate mobile gaming — the likes of which have not yet been seen. Hardware finalization for the Xbox Surface is currently underway, according to The Verge, and early rumored specs were leaked back in June.

Microsoft

Submission + - Surface sales 'modest' so far said Ballmer (theregister.co.uk)

hcs_$reboot writes: Sales of Microsoft’s Windows RT-based Surface tablet are off to a “modest” start according to chief executive Steve Ballmer. Given the general dropping sales in the PC business coupled with Microsoft’s relatively small inventory of Surface machines, it’ll be interesting to see how soon Surface can hit Microsoft’s million milestone.
(Update originally from French Le Parisien)

Security

Submission + - Alere Loses 100,000 Patient's Personal Details, SSNs, Diagnoses (marcoislandflorida.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The 'health management' company Alere produces and markets in-home medical devices that act as electronic middle-men between doctors and patients taking warfarin (an anti-coagulant drug). Levels of the drug in the blood stream need to be constantly monitored to ensure levels remain within safe ranges, too little and there is a risk of blood clots, too much and hemorrhage can occur. This data is processed by Alere and distributed to qualified health professions who then interpret the results, taking action as required. However, on the 23rd of September, an Alere employee laptop with an unencrypted file containing the health records and personal details of all 100,000 patients being monitored was stolen from a parked car. The company did not become aware of the privacy breach until the 1st of October, and since then affected patients have been notified by mail and have been offered identity theft checks. The OCR has not yet been notified (notification must be made within 60 days), and the neither the laptop nor the data have been recovered. It begs the question, would you trust a 3rd party health provider with your personal information? What if the home test had been for more stigmatised diseases such as HIV antigen levels?

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