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Privacy

Submission + - Where is the safest place to host a website? 2

aztracker1 writes: Given the number of intrusions in terms of U.S. (and its' allies) based hosting providers turning over data without a warrant, and rulings that consider "cloud" data to not be private, I have to ask. Where is the safest place to host a web server these days?

I've been thinking of putting some data services up, and have no problem with responding to limited court orders, or even paying income taxes on any profits made. I do have a problem with client data potentially being seized without due process.
NASA

Submission + - Landsat 8 Satellite Successfully Launches into Orbit (nasa.gov)

adosch writes: The Landsat Data Continuity Mission is now in orbit, after launching Monday from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Calif. After about three months of testing, the U.S. Geological Survey will take control and the mission, renamed Landsat 8, will extend more than 40 years of global land observations critical to energy and water management, forest monitoring, human and environmental health, urban planning, disaster recovery and agriculture.
Mars

Submission + - 71 Percent of U.S. See Humans On Mars By 2033 (discovery.com) 2

astroengine writes: "In a recent poll funded by the non-profit Explore Mars, 71% of respondents agreed that the US will send a human to Mars within the next two decades. Unfortunately, on average, the sample of 1,101 people surveyed thought the US government allocated 2.4% of the federal budget to NASA — in reality it's only 0.5%. With this in mind, 75% of the respondents agreed/strongly agreed that NASA's budget should be increased to explore Mars through manned and robotic means."
Government

Submission + - More on missile defense: will the Ground-based Midcourse Defense ever work? (thebulletin.org)

Lasrick writes: Kingston Reif analyzes GMD (Ground-based Midcourse Defense) and shakes his head over the House Armed Services Committee (last year) authorizing the Pentagon to spend $360 million more than it asked for to expand the flawed system. "The Committee also provided an additional $100 million to begin deploying existing ground-based or SM-3 interceptors — not the interceptors recommended by the National Research Council — on the East Coast of the United States by the end of 2015 to defend against potential future long-range ballistic missiles launched from Iran."

Comment On Point (Score 2) 372

This is completely on point. Technology is great! I have been in the business for a long time and we can make many things better through the use of technology. But, pushing IT off on every supposed problem (what was wrong with the classroom that we are trying to fix) does not make things better. For instance I like to cook, but putting my oven on the internet doesn't make me a better cook. It is just a waist of technology. A solution looking for a problem. A teacher has stood in front of students and taught them to understand a subject matter for literally millennia. Adding high tech online line cloud based learning solutions is an answer to a problem that does not exist.
Java

Submission + - Yahoo! Pushing Java Version Released in 2008 (krebsonsecurity.com)

futhermocker writes: From TFA:

"At a time when Apple, Mozilla and other tech giants are taking steps to prevent users from browsing the Web with outdated versions ofJava,Yahoo!is pushing many of its users in the other direction: The free tool that it offers users to help build Web sites installs a dangerously insecYahoo! has offered SiteBuilder to its millions of users for years, but unfortunately the tool introduces a myriad of security vulnerabilities on host PCs.SiteBuilder requires Java, but the version of Java that Yahoo! bundles with it isJava 6 Update 7. It’s not clear if this is just a gross oversight or if their tool really doesn’t work with more recent versions of Java. The company has yet to respond to requests for comment.

Medicine

Submission + - Scientists Use Gene Therapy to Cure Dogs of Type 1 Diabetes (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have claimed a first by successfully using a single session of gene therapy to cure dogs of type 1 diabetes. The work has shown that it is possible to cure the disease in large animals with a minimally-invasive procedure – potentially leading the way to further developments in studies for human treatment of the disease.
Moon

Submission + - Astronomers Want to Hunt Down Earth's Mini-Moons (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "The Earth has one permanent moon — you know, "The Moon" — but at any given time there are thought to be two temporary interlopers that were once asteroids, but get captured by our planet's gravity to become mini-moons for a few months or even years. They eventually get flung back out into interplanetary space. This ultimate "catch and release" provides an interesting opportunity for any future asteroid mission. So now astronomers want to find them, possibly using the newly-minted Hubble-class spy telescopes donated to NASA by the National Reconnaissance Office."

Submission + - Programmer Interrupted (ninlabs.com)

gameweld writes: Some key findings from a study of 10,000 programming sessions recorded from 86 programmers using Eclipse and Visual Studio:
A programmer takes between 10-15 minutes to start editing code after resuming work from an interruption.
When interrupted during an edit of a method, only 10% of times did a programmer resume work in less than a minute.
A programmer is likely to get just one uninterrupted 2-hour session in a day.

The Military

Submission + - The Black Hornet Is The $195,000 Spy Plane That Fits In Your Hand (gizmocrazed.com)

Diggester writes: The British have been using this little drone for about a year. It's called the Black Hornet Nano Unmanned Aircraft System, costs $195,000 and can fly for a total of 25 minutes. It is equipped with a small camera that can send back full video or still images to the soldiers screen, with range of up to 1000 meters. The device is 10 cm long and weighing 16 grams, with a 4 inch rotor span — think a little longer than your middle finger.

The British seem to really like this drone, it is powered by a small battery pack that enables it to fly at up to 10 m/s. What is really awesome about it is that it can be controlled via an 'autopilot' type mode where it goes to its destination via a GPS chip.

Comment Re:Sucks, I guess, (Score 2) 259

Yes, HELL YES, being a corporation means playing by our rules. EPA, FDA, Taxes, SEC; we have millions of rules about the behavior of corporations. They are not all good I will grant you, but we absolutely as the entity that creates their legal existence (government) have the right to enforce rules on them. The rules that control a corporation should be intended to force that corporation to act in a way beneficial to society while making a profit. I would say that we as a society are well within our any moral or legalistic code to force camera makers or car makers to sell to 3rd party repair shops at the same price that they sell to dealers. I continue to be amazed by people who want to allow corporations complete freedom of action. The laws that allow for the "personhood" of a corporate entity are there for the benefit of real people. We control those laws. We can certainly compel those fictional persons to act in any manner that we deem in the interest of the market or the wider society.

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